PDA

View Full Version : Sad news- Harry Sims- 3-Cushion champ


cueandcushion
11-21-2006, 01:44 PM
I was informed today that Harry Sims, former 3-Cushion champion, passed away in his sleep last night. It is assumed the cause of death was complications due to severe diabetes. Harry was the owner of Airport Billiards here in St. Louis. Harry also made and repaired cues in his store. My condolences to Harry's wife Sandy, and his friends and family for their loss. I will edit this as I learn any more information.

manwon
11-21-2006, 04:28 PM
I was informed today that Harry Sims, former 3-Cushion champion, passed away in his sleep last night. It is assumed the cause of death was complications due to severe diabetes. Harry was the owner of Airport Billiards here in St. Louis. Harry also made and repaired cues in his store. My condolences to Harry's wife Sandy, and his friends and family for their loss. I will edit this as I learn any more information.

Nice post Craig, Harry was great player and he was also always good to me. I also offer condolences to his family for their loss, I am certain he will be missed by many.

Harry was known as Hollywood Fats Sims and below are a few of his many accomplishments.

1. Published in 1979 a Book called( Key Shots, Beginners Course, for 3-Cushion Billiards)

2. US. National Champion - Billiard Federation in 1980 and again in 1983.

3. Former American Billiards Association Semi - Pro National Champion.

4. Harry was also a three time Illinois State Champion.

Manwon

lfigueroa
11-22-2006, 07:03 AM
Harry, was something of a curdmugeon, but underneath it all a good guy.

I once saw him do one of the most impressive things I've ever seen on any table. This would have been 10 years or so ago and he was giving a 3C lesson. I was practicing on a table not too far away and was sort of listening in. At one point in the lesson, Harry was trying to make the point that you need a good imagination to be a good 3C player. So he set up the balls (don't recall the layout, so don't ask) and asked his student how he'd shoot the shot. And the guy says something like, "Well, I'd go off the red three rails." Harry then says, sure, but says you could shoot it off the black first and go four, shoots the shot and makes the point. He then says, or you could go rail first, sets up the shot and makes the point. Bottomline: Harry set up the shot four times and made it four different ways, on one try, and none of them was the easy "off the red three rails." Like I said, one of the greatest things I've ever seen.

RIP, Harry.

Lou Figueroa


I was informed today that Harry Sims, former 3-Cushion champion, passed away in his sleep last night. It is assumed the cause of death was complications due to severe diabetes. Harry was the owner of Airport Billiards here in St. Louis. Harry also made and repaired cues in his store. My condolences to Harry's wife Sandy, and his friends and family for their loss. I will edit this as I learn any more information.

Bob Jewett
11-22-2006, 11:11 AM
I was informed today that Harry Sims, former 3-Cushion champion, passed away in his sleep last night. ...
Sad news.

Before he moved to St. Louis, Harry was the house man at California Billiards in San Jose, where the US National 3-Cushion Championships were held many times in the 70's and 80's. They had four carom tables with theater seating on both sides. Harry did the table and cue maintenance and gave lessons. He also played pool, and reportedly had run 11 racks of nine ball.

jay helfert
11-22-2006, 11:43 AM
Sad news.

Before he moved to St. Louis, Harry was the house man at California Billiards in San Jose, where the US National 3-Cushion Championships were held many times in the 70's and 80's. They had four carom tables with theater seating on both sides. Harry did the table and cue maintenance and gave lessons. He also played pool, and reportedly had run 11 racks of nine ball.

Harry got around. At one time, he was proprieter at Hollywood Billiards, hence the nickname. Many 3C players came in and tried him out, but I only heard of two players that ever beat him. Allen Gilbert and Frank Torres, probably the two best American players the last 30 years.

He was always very pleasant to me and quite free with his knowledge. I liked the man and enjoyed our conversations. He did not have a big ego and was quite willing to listen to other points of view, different from his own. We held a big pool tourney there once, and many top players showed up.

If you didn't know him, you would not know he was a great 3C player. He never tried to hustle anyone and he never bragged about his prowess. But if asked to play, he would go right to it, and pile up the points with little effort. He played around a solid .9 to 1.0 speed.

billiardshot
11-22-2006, 03:49 PM
I Didn't know Harry Sims, but I found this wonderful article about him.

http://www.zimsrack.com/DWSims1.html

http://www.zimsrack.com/DWSims2.html

3kushn
11-22-2006, 05:45 PM
Harry was one of my very best friends and my coach. (Guess I'm revieling my identity to the St. Louis guys) One day I walked into Cue and Cushion after about maybe a year of not even pulling my (pool) cue out of it's case. I started to "bang" the balls around and Bob came up to me and said "Did you hear Harry Sims has move to St. Louis? I was so unaware I didn't even know who he was. Bob says "He's a pretty good player from LA" So I started coming in as much as possible till I met him. I was playing by myself and Harry asked if I'd like to play some. He simply got his cue from behind the counter and proceeded to beat me around the head and shoulders. I might have scored 2 or 3 billiards to 25. I immediately decided now was my opportunity to "really" learn this game. I played everyday many times with him. He had no problem playing someone of my caliber. Finally he said "I do give lessons you know" 5- 1 hour lessons for a C note. I jumped at that. The lessons were more like 2 hours. Probably because I needed it. I practiced and practiced the lessons till he finally realized I really did want to learn this game. From then on the lessons were free. He always gave you your moneys worth, to a fault, but he didn't have time for those who wouldn't listen.

Harry simply hated to lose. No matter how well I was playing he somehow turn up the dial. My gage was if I could get 20 or more to 25 I was ready for anyone. Usually the game was 15 to 25. He had no mercy at the table. If I did beat him which was only a few time a year it was like his whole life was a failure. Guess the killer instinct helps you become world class.

Harry took me from nothing to a Regional Contender. My only regret is that I didn't qualify for the Nationals before he left us. That was my goal for him more than me. He may have wanted me to go more than I did.

Should have worked harder.

Sorry for that.

jimmyg
11-22-2006, 07:10 PM
Harry was one of my very best friends and my coach. (Guess I'm revieling my identity to the St. Louis guys) One day I walked into Cue and Cushion after about maybe a year of not even pulling my (pool) cue out of it's case. I started to "bang" the balls around and Bob came up to me and said "Did you hear Harry Sims has move to St. Louis? I was so unaware I didn't even know who he was. Bob says "He's a pretty good player from LA" So I started coming in as much as possible till I met him. I was playing by myself and Harry asked if I'd like to play some. He simply got his cue from behind the counter and proceeded to beat me around the head and shoulders. I might have scored 2 or 3 billiards to 25. I immediately decided now was my opportunity to "really" learn this game. I played everyday many times with him. He had no problem playing someone of my caliber. Finally he said "I do give lessons you know" 5- 1 hour lessons for a C note. I jumped at that. The lessons were more like 2 hours. Probably because I needed it. I practiced and practiced the lessons till he finally realized I really did want to learn this game. From then on the lessons were free. He always gave you your moneys worth, to a fault, but he didn't have time for those who wouldn't listen.

Harry simply hated to lose. No matter how well I was playing he somehow turn up the dial. My gage was if I could get 20 or more to 25 I was ready for anyone. Usually the game was 15 to 25. He had no mercy at the table. If I did beat him which was only a few time a year it was like his whole life was a failure. Guess the killer instinct helps you become world class.

Harry took me from nothing to a Regional Contender. My only regret is that I didn't qualify for the Nationals before he left us. That was my goal for him more than me. He may have wanted me to go more than I did.

Should have worked harder.

Sorry for that.

Wow!, The ending of your testimonial really made me a little emotional, and I have never heard of Harry Sims.

One thing I am sure of though, if Mr. Sims learns what you just wrote, and I believe that he will, he will be one happy man. You will have confirmed to him your love of the game, and your tremendous respect and admiration for him as, not only a player, but as a person and friend as well. You will have also made him happy to have taken the time to teach and play with you.

Well said.

Jim

JamisonNeu
11-25-2006, 01:14 PM
Harry was a great player and extraordinary person in general. He loved this sport so much he kept his place open every day, even on christmas. I can only imagine how much time he spent around the game always adding class and trying to be positive. When I was about 18 I felt like quiting pool. Harry convinced me to redirect my studies. It is because of insight and his rare video collection that I started shooting artistic cue sports. I will always remember him for that. I got many smiles from Harry and he will be missed greatly by me.
Jamison

3kushn
11-25-2006, 02:31 PM
Harry was a great player and extraordinary person in general. He loved this sport so much he kept his place open every day, even on christmas. I can only imagine how much time he spent around the game always adding class and trying to be positive. When I was about 18 I felt like quiting pool. Harry convinced me to redirect my studies. It is because of insight and his rare video collection that I started shooting artistic cue sports. I will always remember him for that. I got many smiles from Harry and he will be missed greatly by me.
Jamison
While practicing just the other day at Airport Billiards one of the regulars was talking to Harry about me and Harry said "I'll bet I've lost more game than he's ever played. He was probably right. Nobody ever reaches the level he had without total dedication and personal sacrifice.

billiardshot
11-27-2006, 07:51 AM
There should been more to Harry Sims Obituary, a shame.Unless this what he wanted.

http://www.legacy.com/stltoday/DeathNotices.asp?Page=Lifestory&PersonId=20071703

Regard
Bob Watson [ billiardshot]

12squared
11-27-2006, 08:23 AM
Harry & I first met while I was living in Detroit area in the early 70's. He came out to play in a 3-cushion tournament that Ray Abrams held every year in those days at his Oak Park Cushion & Cue. I was lucky enough to have won entry into my first "pro" event by winning a summer long tournament as a B player (the B & A brackets won entry). I had played a couple of matches and was scheduled to play Harry. Never hearing of him, I thought I had a chance...NOT! He ran through me like a warm knife through butter. It hurt so good :eek:.

I moved to Southern California in Oct 1976 and shortly after, Harry & I met again. We became friends. After not seeing Harry for a number of years, I saw Harry again when I stopped in to Airport Billiards on my way to Derby City Classic in 2002. He was a great host, as always, for the couple hours I was there & we were very happy to see each other. I am so grateful to have had the opportunity to see him again now that he past. Sorry to here this news. He will be missed.

Dave

3kushn
11-27-2006, 09:18 AM
I received a call last night from Paul Frankel (Professor Q Ball). He informed me that the first Regional 3 Cushion Tournament at the DCC will be in memory of Al Gilbert and the Second tournament will be in memory of Harry Sims.

This is a great honor for both. Both men worked very hard to promote and teach the game of 3 Cushion. This couldn't be a better place to show the professional pool players as well as the general public the beauty of the game and hopefully will spark an interest in some to learn more.

Any of you going to the DCC please make it a point to set out some time to watch some of this action. If you've never seen 3 Cushion before I assure you won't regret the time spent. Remember, all of the old Masters of Pool at least had a working knowledge of all the Carom games if not World Class caliber. It will improve your knowledge to be exposed.

One warning although. It's highly addictive and there is no known cure.