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View Full Version : To refinish, or not to refinish...ANOTHER question...


8-ball Rat
11-22-2006, 09:45 AM
Hiya guys,

Let's, for the sake of arguement, say that one has purchased an older cue of relatively noteworthy heritage.

And let's, for the sake of same arguement, say that the cue has it's fair share of minor battle scars, dirty wrap, dirty shafts, and old tips.

And let's, to finish the aforementioned arguement, say that one intends to play with said cue on a semi-regular basis....at least until something else comes along (and there is ALWAYS something else, isn't there??!! :) )

Should one send it off to be refinished, and look like new....or should one leave it all original?

For the sake of arguement, the cue is straight and sound...no issues there....it's just battle-worn.

I would hazard a guess there will be arguements for each side....so I guess I'm looking for a majority opinion.

Fire away, folks.

Rat

JLITALIEN
11-22-2006, 10:00 AM
I have read many post concerning similar issues opinions vary quite a bit. The collector would more than likely say leave it original. While the player would most likely say refinish it and play on. Personally I say refinish the cue and use it like there is no tommorow! I would try to send it to the cue maker or one of their apprentaces for refinishing if possible. I feel that most cues were made with one pourpose in mind, to play pool.

steev
11-22-2006, 10:06 AM
i'd wait to refinish until i was ready to sell :D

-s

Cornerman
11-22-2006, 10:12 AM
Hiya guys,

Let's, for the sake of arguement, say that one has purchased an older cue of relatively noteworthy heritage.

And let's, for the sake of same arguement, say that the cue has it's fair share of minor battle scars, dirty wrap, dirty shafts, and old tips.

And let's, to finish the aforementioned arguement, say that one intends to play with said cue on a semi-regular basis....at least until something else comes along (and there is ALWAYS something else, isn't there??!! :) )

Should one send it off to be refinished, and look like new....or should one leave it all original?

For the sake of arguement, the cue is straight and sound...no issues there....it's just battle-worn.

I would hazard a guess there will be arguements for each side....so I guess I'm looking for a majority opinion.

Fire away, folks.

RatI would only refinish an historic cue with provenance if the cue is unplayable without a refinish or rewrap.

Fred

Jude Rosenstock
11-22-2006, 10:14 AM
I have read many post concerning similar issues opinions vary quite a bit. The collector would more than likely say leave it original. While the player would most likely say refinish it and play on. Personally I say refinish the cue and use it like there is no tommorow! I would try to send it to the cue maker or one of their apprentaces for refinishing if possible. I feel that most cues were made with one pourpose in mind, to play pool.


Agreed. It really depends on what you are planning on doing with it. If you intend to play with it, why not get it refinished? If you intend to sell it, you might want to investigate how it might help/hurt its value.

HIRUN526
11-22-2006, 11:11 AM
Is the cue a "real" collectable?
Who is the cuemaker?

Those are the two most important questions.

jhendri2
11-22-2006, 11:19 AM
My rule of thumb FWIW -

1. If the cuemaker is dead and you plan on selling it at some point - no
2. If the cuemaker is alive and you plan on selling it at some point - yes, by the original maker if possible
3. If the cuemaker is dead or alive and you never plan on selling - do whatever you'll get more enjoyment out of

Jim

SCCues
11-22-2006, 11:32 AM
I'd have to get my cue refinished if it had battle scars for being played with. It bothers me to have a nice cue and the finish is nicked or dented. I'd enjoy the cue much more if it was in top condition and i'd definately get the cue maker who built the cue to do the refinish work if he's still in business.

Hunter
11-22-2006, 11:33 AM
My rule of thumb FWIW -

1. If the cuemaker is dead and you plan on selling it at some point - no
2. If the cuemaker is alive and you plan on selling it at some point - yes, by the original maker if possible
3. If the cuemaker is dead or alive and you never plan on selling - do whatever you'll get more enjoyment out of

Jim
Great rule of thumb! In this case, I believe the maker is deceased, but the shop is still in business. I would still recommend leaving it original until you decide whether or not to hold on to it (or plan on selling it to me :D ). Original condition is best by far if you plan on resale. If you keep it, you probably would want to make it pretty, but I used to have one that was in completely original condition and it just felt so good that I played with it as is (until I sold it, of course...). Reminded me of a favorite pair of old shoes...just looked and felt "right". Take care and Happy Thanksgiving!

Steve

ratcues
11-22-2006, 01:46 PM
I also tell people not to refinish a cue unless the dents and dings interfere with its playability, such as the ding being where you hold the cue, stoke it, or if it runs through your head as you are trying to shoot.

There is always a risk when getting a cue refinished, no matter who does it, so I'd only do it if I had to.

twilight
11-22-2006, 03:24 PM
What do you guys think if the cue looks like it once had an oil finish and it's so worn that the bare wood is now exposed in several places? Does that have any affect on your decision to refinish or not? Cuemaker is still alive but this is a very old cue.

8-ball Rat
11-22-2006, 04:10 PM
Well, my track record lends itself to the very real possibility that I'll have it for a month or two, then sell it.

That said, though....this thing is rumored to be an absolute FREAK hitter, so it's also possible I'll fall in love with it, sell all my other cues, and bask in the glory that is "The One/"

Bottom line....I have no idea. :) :)

I do think, though, that ya'll make alot of sense.....on both sides of the fence.

I think what I'll do, for the meantime, is just hold onto it, in it's original condition. There's no "playing" areas on the shafts or handle that feel bad...so nothing to detract from how it'll feel to play with it.

And....truth be told....I kinda like the "vintage" look it has going on. That's kinda weird for me, since I want my own cues, for the most part, to look perfect in every way......but there's something that just looks "right" about the older finish, battle scars, and old patina shafts.

A ton of thanks to you all for your insights. I will be sure to give proper "Thanks" for you all tomorrow during dinner!!!

Be good, and have a good night.

Mark

Snapshot9
11-22-2006, 04:33 PM
If it does not embarrass or bother you to play with it, don't refinish until right before you sell it. If it does embarrass or bother you, go ahead and get it refinished.