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Troublemaker
04-06-2007, 10:05 AM
I'd really like to start playing straight pool, but don't know anyone who plays. What's the best way to get started? I've played around a little bit, but the break shots are a real problem. I'm only an SL3. Is there a book someone could recommend, or should I really look at getting a lesson?

Thanks.

selftaut
04-06-2007, 10:33 AM
I'd really like to start playing straight pool, but don't know anyone who plays. What's the best way to get started? I've played around a little bit, but the break shots are a real problem. I'm only an SL3. Is there a book someone could recommend, or should I really look at getting a lesson?

Thanks.

Hello Troublemaker! welcome to the forum , there are lots of good books out there and they do help a lot , Robert Byrne is one that comes to mind. For break shots try this simple drill in your routine , scatter 6 or 7 balls on the table , now select a ball that would be best for the break ball , then select a ball that gets you easily on the break ball (we will call your key ball) your key ball best cirumstance is a simple stop shot or one rail onto your break ball, now select another ball that gets you easiest onto the key ball (we will call your setup ball) and this ball should be in a position to best get you correct shape on your key ball . OK , now take ball in hand anywhere on the table after you have selected your finishing 3 balls and run down to your finishing 3 ball pattern you planned out and execute your plan , then rack'em and break'em!

TheWizard
04-06-2007, 10:39 AM
Hey buddy :), check this link out :) http://www.accu-stats.com/Qstore/Qstore.cgi?CMD=009&DEPT=000004&CAT=000007&BACK=A0007A1B0000004B1

These are 2 instructionals by Jimmy Rempe, I have watched both tapes a few years back just for the sake of watching them, and they are definitely a worthy investment :)

There is also a book worth getting by Arthur 'Babe' Cranfield "The Straight Pool Bible" and it gived some details on more advanced play, but also covers most of the basics too :)

I hope that this is of some help :)

Willie

Kevin
04-11-2007, 11:36 AM
Two other great sources of straight pool wisdom:

Accu-Stats.com has Grady Mathew's "Break Shots and Key Balls" video, very useful because the video demonstrates a key point, the proper sensible speed for each of the break shot variations.

On the book side, Phil Capelle's "Play your best Straight Pool" could almost be called a bible on the game, I can think of little left out in this treatment on the subject.

On the free side, YouTube has some videos as well, search around or ask here for pointers.

Bob Jewett
04-11-2007, 12:23 PM
I'd really like to start playing straight pool, but don't know anyone who plays. What's the best way to get started? I've played around a little bit, but the break shots are a real problem. I'm only an SL3. Is there a book someone could recommend, or should I really look at getting a lesson?

Thanks.
Besides the other books mentioned, George Fels also covers 14.1 in some of his books. He has an interesting system for classifying shots to organize your patterns.

PKM
04-12-2007, 08:52 AM
I am also interested in learning the game, having no experience.

Is there a rationale for all of those re-racking rules that involve the head spot? That seems kind of strange to me.

selftaut
04-12-2007, 09:05 AM
I am also interested in learning the game, having no experience.

Is there a rationale for all of those re-racking rules that involve the head spot? That seems kind of strange to me.

If you are talking about racking for a continuous inning then one of the reasons for all those rules is because a lot of different scenarios could occur since there are 2 balls remaining before the next rack , the 15th ball from the previous rack (break ball) could be in the rack , the cue ball could be in the rack , they could both be in the rack.

Pushout
04-12-2007, 11:25 AM
Besides the other books mentioned, George Fels also covers 14.1 in some of his books. He has an interesting system for classifying shots to organize your patterns.

Mastering Pool was probably the biggest help to me, more at that time, than anything else I read. George sent me a copy when it first came out, before it was available publicly, I think. Though I don't remember the patterns he described without have a look, because I play so little Straight pool these days, I know they helped me a bunch.

StraightPoolIU
04-12-2007, 07:10 PM
Cappelle, Byrne, Rempe all excellent recommendations. I've never seen Grady's breakshots and key balls tape, but I've heard good things. The tape that helped me learn the basics of 14.1 is one that I don't think is in print any more and that was Mike Sigel's original Perfect Pool series. He explains all the common breakshots and basic strategy. It also came with a tape of him running 100 balls and explaining. Long story short get some instructional materials that aren't over your head to start with. The Rempe tape is really good. Then I would get some accu-stats straight pool matches to see how it's done by the best. Get a good mix of tapes with high runs and some with a lot of safety play.

dmgwalsh
04-13-2007, 07:33 AM
Cappelle, Byrne, Rempe all excellent recommendations. I've never seen Grady's breakshots and key balls tape, but I've heard good things. The tape that helped me learn the basics of 14.1 is one that I don't think is in print any more and that was Mike Sigel's original Perfect Pool series. He explains all the common breakshots and basic strategy. It also came with a tape of him running 100 balls and explaining. Long story short get some instructional materials that aren't over your head to start with. The Rempe tape is really good. Then I would get some accu-stats straight pool matches to see how it's done by the best. Get a good mix of tapes with high runs and some with a lot of safety play.

Mike Sigel's two early tapes, Perfect Pool and Run Out Pool are very good. I extracted the 14.1 stuff and now have a dvd with Sigel Perfect straight pool and Run out straight pool.

Do NOT make the mistake of buying the recent Sigel/Trudeau dreck entitled Perfect Pool.

The other titles mentioned are good. Especially George Fels and his labeling of the balls and mantras about clearing rails and opening up pockets.

I noticed last night during my matches, I was playing very unfelslike, saving my rail balls until the end. I stumbled through somehow, but it wasn't pretty. During one sequence I remarked "Just like Mosconi. All the shots are easy.", which couldn't have been further from the truth. Circus shots, wild cueball, terrible shapes. Oh, well. Something to strive for.