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boozebag
04-17-2007, 03:52 PM
Hi Folks,
i am very new to this forum and am enjoying reading all your posts.
I am about to play in my first Straight pool tournament next month and have just began to play staright pool for the first time.
I was wondering what the best tactic or the usual opening break shot is? As here in Scotland i have never even seen anyone playing Straight pool, just mostly 8ball and 9ball. I have seen a few videos but it is always in the middle of a run and not the opening break safety shot. Any input would be greatly appreciated.

Bob Jewett
04-17-2007, 04:15 PM
Hi Folks,
i am very new to this forum and am enjoying reading all your posts.
I am about to play in my first Straight pool tournament next month and have just began to play staright pool for the first time.
I was wondering what the best tactic or the usual opening break shot is? As here in Scotland i have never even seen anyone playing Straight pool, just mostly 8ball and 9ball. I have seen a few videos but it is always in the middle of a run and not the opening break safety shot. Any input would be greatly appreciated.
It is essentially the same as the standard break-off in snooker with a few exceptions. You should hit the corner ball in the triangle rather than the one next to it. You play with enough side to go end-side-side-end on cushion contacts, as at snooker (usually). You want to pass through where the blue would be, though, since this will leave the cue ball near the corner pocket which is better than in the middle of the end rail.

Get the pace right to leave the cue ball on the head cushion and the rest will take care of itself.

Gerry
04-17-2007, 05:01 PM
Damn Bob! how are we going to have a spirited debate on the subject of proper breaking when you go and answer the question with a perfect answer?!:)

Hey, don't forget the 2 rail behind the rack hitting the corner ball and banking it in the side breaker we all know and love!:D

Gerry

boozebag
04-18-2007, 07:56 AM
Thank you for your answers guys, just made me think if it is much of an advantage to break or let the other guy break and possibly make a mistake. Anyway off to practise some break shots , thanks again

Bob Jewett
04-18-2007, 08:14 AM
Thank you for your answers guys, just made me think if it is much of an advantage to break or let the other guy break and possibly make a mistake. Anyway off to practise some break shots , thanks again
It's usually considered a disadvantage to break.

Some things I forgot to mention: If the balls are not tight across the back of the rack, you may get a really bad break. If all the balls are tight, you will not get the "perfect" break with the two corner balls returning to the rack after hitting cushions. If the balls are loose in just the right way, the perfect break is nearly automatic (make a tight rack, then move the front 10 balls up the table by 2mm). You probably want to put the cue ball closer to the side cushion than at snooker, or the far corner ball will not have enough speed to get back to the rack.

3andstop
04-18-2007, 08:24 AM
The only thing I would like to suggest in addition to the description without fail is to LOOK at that last row of balls after your opponent racks. Be sure they are all kissing or the effect of driving the two end balls to the cushion and back into the rack will result in a thing of moosh instead of a thing of beauty. Its a big enough disadvantage to break as it is without letting your opponent give you what I call the "Coney Island Con" rack to boot. :)

boozebag
04-18-2007, 09:11 AM
excellent guys thanks, i thought it must be a disadvantage to break, think i'll stop practising the lag LOL. I am enjoying straight pool much more than 9-ball although it is a refreshing change rather than playing 8-ball on the 7x 4 table.

Neil
04-18-2007, 11:23 AM
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mthornto
04-18-2007, 01:10 PM
It's usually considered a disadvantage to break.


It is a disadvantage to break. You seldom will get the perfect break, so most times you will leave a long, but makeable shot. Or you will leave an easy return safety. Practice your lag so you can tell him to break.

This is the standard answer that everybody gives, so let me disagree. It really depends on the opponent. I don't have a perfect straight pool break. More often than not I leave the ball I contact in the rack hanging out for a shot.

Still, in over half my matches I opt to break. Why? I know my opponents. I know who can make the long hard shots and who can't. While I do hang a ball out there, I am pretty good about getting the cue ball back down the table to the cushion. This leaves a very hard shot for even good players. Way more often than not my opponent will go for the shot, miss it and open the rack. Works out pretty well.

I just come down to knowing if your opponent can make that first long hard shot and if they will go for the shot.

Neil
04-18-2007, 05:01 PM
..............

thrasher789
04-19-2007, 07:54 AM
It is essentially the same as the standard break-off in snooker with a few exceptions. You should hit the corner ball in the triangle rather than the one next to it. You play with enough side to go end-side-side-end on cushion contacts, as at snooker (usually). You want to pass through where the blue would be, though, since this will leave the cue ball near the corner pocket which is better than in the middle of the end rail.

Get the pace right to leave the cue ball on the head cushion and the rest will take care of itself.
Thank you, I had also been trying to work on a good straight pool break and that summed up exactly what I should be trying.