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View Full Version : Tip Hardness -vs- Cue Ball Hardness


MikeJanis
05-08-2007, 09:29 PM
I was wondering if anyone had any data on Cue Ball Hardness.

I found a listing at xtremebilliards.com ( http://xtremebilliard.com/page7.html ) that listed tip hardness but I have not been able to find any info on Cue Ball hardness.

Can anyone point me to any data regarding Cue Ball Hardness ?

Or to any Data that compares Tip Hardness -vs- Cue Ball Ball Hardness ?



Thanks,

Mj

X Breaker
05-08-2007, 09:34 PM
I was wondering if anyone had any data on Cue Ball Hardness.

I found a listing at xtremebilliards.com ( http://xtremebilliard.com/page7.html ) that listed tip hardness but I have not been able to find any info on Cue Ball hardness.

Can anyone point me to any data regarding Cue Ball Hardness ?

Or to any Data that compares Tip Hardness -vs- Cue Ball Ball Hardness ?



Thanks,

Mj

I remember reading an article that the billiard ball material is the hardest "plastic" around. I will try to find that article for you.

Thank you.
Richard

MikeJanis
05-08-2007, 09:36 PM
I remember reading an article that the billiard ball material is the hardest "plastic" around. I will try to find that article for you.

Thank you.
Richard


Richard, thank you in advance. You are always an assett to our sport.

Please give me a call. I'll be up for the next hour or so.

Mj

MikeJanis
05-08-2007, 10:01 PM
I found this at http://www.saluc.com/html/billiard/index.php?idlien=4 . It's informative but not real technical. Mj

Aramith phenolic resin : why it makes the difference !

Heavy duty design

Rather than a polyester number-plug-design, the Aramith concept has the numbers precision-engraved in a solid core that runs all the way through the ball. As such, it is impossible for number-cores to fall out over time. Using phenolic resin assures homogeneous characteristics in each ball part. So homogeneous that when finally getting to its breaking point (and one needs minimum a 5 ton-load in case of an Aramith ball), the ball will break up totally at random, and not along the parting line between the stripe and the rest of the ball, as one would expect.



Burn-spot resistant

Hitting a cue ball actually accelerates it from 0 to over 30 km/h (20 MPH) in just a fraction of a second.The resulting friction temperature between ball and cloth can easily reach 250°c (482°F). That's why Aramith balls are the only ones made from genuine phenolic resin : their molecular structure is engineered to be wear resistant at these high temperatures, making Aramith balls far less vulnerable to abrasive burn-spots. They hold their high luster and smoothness over a much longer period of time, resulting in minimal ball and table cloth wear.



High Impact resistance

Because hitting the balls is the essence of the billiard game, impact resistance is a critical factor. Aramith's phenolic heat-curing process fully stabilizes material tensions. It produces a vitrified high-density surface that offers maximum impact resistance. Tests show Aramith phenolic balls to withstand to over 50 times more impacts than other polymer or polyester balls. They are also twice more scratch-resistant.
Consequently, when intensively used even on less maintained tables, Aramith balls are clearly far less easily damaged than others by pocket fixings, table mechanisms or cue sticks...


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