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View Full Version : it hasnt gotten hot yet, humidity in my basement pool room is 65 to 70%.......


scottycoyote
05-12-2007, 09:05 PM
so what do you guys think......860 or 760 simonis? Its been in the 50s during the nights, mid and high 70s during the days. Some of my basement is below ground, the back is exposed with a walkout. Virginia gets on up in the 90s during summer, moderate winters........as the temp goes up im guessing the humidity is going with it, i play mostly 9ball......setting up a 9foot kim steele in a few weeks and i have to order my cloth soon. Which?

pdcue
05-13-2007, 01:55 AM
so what do you guys think......860 or 760 simonis? Its been in the 50s during the nights, mid and high 70s during the days. Some of my basement is below ground, the back is exposed with a walkout. Virginia gets on up in the 90s during summer, moderate winters........as the temp goes up im guessing the humidity is going with it, i play mostly 9ball......setting up a 9foot kim steele in a few weeks and i have to order my cloth soon. Which?

760
If you don't use a serious de-humidifier, playing on
any cloth will be pure torture

Dale<been there, done that>

Russ Chewning
05-13-2007, 02:12 AM
Agreed. If you don't find a way to cool/dehumidify that basement, the investment of getting a pool table will be wasted.

As an example of how important I think it is to get the room into proper condition for pool, I upgraded my whole-house A/C, so I could also cool my garage conversion. It cost me about $4500.00, and I think it is money well spent, as this A/C is much more energy efficient than the last one. I'll say $200 a month on my heating/cooling bill alone. It pays for itself quickly.

At a minimum, I would get myself two of those stand alone A/C / dehumidifier units. I think they run maybe $500 apiece. I would think having the basement properly sealed would be key, though.

Russ

Da Poet
05-13-2007, 03:30 AM
Agreed. If you don't find a way to cool/dehumidify that basement, the investment of getting a pool table will be wasted.

As an example of how important I think it is to get the room into proper condition for pool, I upgraded my whole-house A/C, so I could also cool my garage conversion. It cost me about $4500.00, and I think it is money well spent, as this A/C is much more energy efficient than the last one. I'll say $200 a month on my heating/cooling bill alone. It pays for itself quickly.

At a minimum, I would get myself two of those stand alone A/C / dehumidifier units. I think they run maybe $500 apiece. I would think having the basement properly sealed would be key, though.

Russ


This is good advice. The newer stand alone dehumidifiers have a digital adjusment for precise control. It's not so much that the humidity needs to be super low, but it is critical that it is stable.

Smart move on the whole house HVAC upgrade Russ and that price does not seem out of line. You might want to pick up a couple inexpensive temperature/humidity monitoring units ($10-20 ea) to make sure the system is balanced between the old and the new areas. Even with the best designed upgrades, there's occasionally a little tweaking needed.

Dartman
05-13-2007, 07:28 AM
so what do you guys think......860 or 760 simonis? Its been in the 50s during the nights, mid and high 70s during the days. Some of my basement is below ground, the back is exposed with a walkout. Virginia gets on up in the 90s during summer, moderate winters........as the temp goes up im guessing the humidity is going with it, i play mostly 9ball......setting up a 9foot kim steele in a few weeks and i have to order my cloth soon. Which?
You can't really "guess" that you might have a humidity issue. You can monitor your house using a hygrometer (similar to a thermometer) to see what the actual humidity is (normal is 50-75%). In Virginia I doubt you would have the same humidity issues as the folks in Florida. Generally speaking if your basement is tied in to the house HVAC system you shouldn't have a problem but if the humidity gets beyond normal you can pick up a good quality dehumidifier. Since you play mostly 9 ball then 860 is typically the better choice of cloth.

FWIW - Simonis HR is available for those that have serious humidity issues.

scottycoyote
05-13-2007, 11:23 AM
You can't really "guess" that you might have a humidity issue. You can monitor your house using a hygrometer (similar to a thermometer) to see what the actual humidity is (normal is 50-75%). In Virginia I doubt you would have the same humidity issues as the folks in Florida. Generally speaking if your basement is tied in to the house HVAC system you shouldn't have a problem but if the humidity gets beyond normal you can pick up a good quality dehumidifier. Since you play mostly 9 ball then 860 is typically the better choice of cloth.

FWIW - Simonis HR is available for those that have serious humidity issues.
well i wasnt guessing.......im using the hygrometer now, thats how i know its been averaging 65 to 70%. I realise 860 is usually the cloth for 9ball, but if my humidity is up then the table will be slower, hence the possibility of switching to 760 to get a faster cloth to make up for it. I dont want a crazy fast table, but i think id rather have it a little fast rather than a little slow....is 760 that much different from 860 speed wise?

cuejoey
05-13-2007, 11:50 AM
Call Menards and Home Depot and get the largest standing dehumidifier.also consider it's placement near the drain IF you can so it will empty out by itself..you may have to add additional drain hose to it..

3andstop
05-13-2007, 11:51 AM
I have 760 on my table and love it. It is faster since there is less wool content. I enjoy straight pool and opening the balls is much more effortless. I think with most poolrooms using the 860 in an a/c environment, and with most poolroom tables being very worn, I think the 760 in your basement would play much closer to most rooms.

Driller
05-13-2007, 12:09 PM
I recently bought a Kim Steele also with 860 that needs to be changed. It is in my shop which has A/C. But I don't run the A/C vey often. So I have the same dilema. I'm trying to choose between 760 or 860 also. My question is, Will the humidity permanently damage the cloth? Or if I run the A/C for a while will the cloth get back in shape?

Russ Chewning
05-13-2007, 12:40 PM
I have 760 on my table and love it. It is faster since there is less wool content. I enjoy straight pool and opening the balls is much more effortless. I think with most poolrooms using the 860 in an a/c environment, and with most poolroom tables being very worn, I think the 760 in your basement would play much closer to most rooms.

Except the rails won't play the same, and the pockets won't play the same. Speed is easy to compensate for, but playing the rails and pockets on a wet table makes for miserable playing. Plus, if you go to a room that has nice new cloth with A/C, you might have a hard time adjusting abck the other way.

Russ

3andstop
05-13-2007, 02:16 PM
I agree. Let me clarify that I don't suggest using 760 is a cure for playing in a humid environment, but it will help.

So long as dehumidifiers are available or space A/C units available, you should use em. :)

kollegedave
05-13-2007, 02:28 PM
The owners of the room I play at put 760 on the one pocket/action table to try and make up for the sluggishness of 860 in that room. There is a lot of square footage there, and the A/C is very inefficient, thus 860 in there plays slower than normal. In any case, the 760 does play a bit faster, but if you ever start playing 1pocket it will mess up the break. With 760 on the table, it is very easy to kiss the corner ball using a traditional 1pocket break. Perhaps, this won't matter for you, however, I do think it shows that there may be some unintended consequences in the 860 to 760 switch.

kollegedave


well i wasnt guessing.......im using the hygrometer now, thats how i know its been averaging 65 to 70%. I realise 860 is usually the cloth for 9ball, but if my humidity is up then the table will be slower, hence the possibility of switching to 760 to get a faster cloth to make up for it. I dont want a crazy fast table, but i think id rather have it a little fast rather than a little slow....is 760 that much different from 860 speed wise?

Dartman
05-13-2007, 07:17 PM
I dont want a crazy fast table, but i think id rather have it a little fast rather than a little slow
You don't know for sure that you will have a humidity problem - but assuming you do - whether you use 860 or 760 either one will be affected to some degree. I think your rationale is that if the faster 760 slows down you'd hope to have the speed of 860. Probably true in the summer but then it reverts in the cooler time of year. Like everyone else is suggesting a good quality dehumidifier should help if the humidity starts getting up over 80%. IMO I'd still go with 860 and try to control the climate in the table location during the summer months.

Scottster
05-13-2007, 07:28 PM
Hi Scott,

A de-humidifier will bring the humidity down very well. With out the de-humidifier, my basement would fluctuate between 65-75%.

With it running constantly, it keepd the room at 50-55% in the summer months.

In order to run it constantly I would highly recommend hooking up a hose and leading it to a drain. The catch basin fills up with water extremely fast and once this occurrs, the unit shuts off, and all the effort is lost.

I bought a heavy duty commercial rubber hose, and ran it through my wall (at a downward angle) to my sump pump so the unit stays on all the time.

Hope this is helpful,

scottycoyote
05-13-2007, 08:09 PM
thanks for the advice and info guys......ill look into the dehumidifiers. The ductwork for my air conditioner goes thru my pool room too (i covered it with drywall), i guess i could always cut a vent or 2 in it and then the basement would get a little a/c......my basement naturally stays pretty cool, maybe between that and the dehumidifiers id be covered and could play the 860.