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Snapshot9
05-16-2007, 05:00 AM
Do you know how to tell which eye is dominant? I was shown a simple test at the eye doctor's that shows you which is the dominant eye.

Find an object about 8 feet from you, medium sized (nose sized), and put your hands out in front of you with palms facing away from you with fingers spread. Bring your hands together with index fingers overlapping to the first digit and your thumbs on the bottom same way until you have like a triangle.

Bring your hands up to focus on the object 8 feet away in the middle of the triangle with your hands.

Now, close your left eye, do you still see the object? If so, you are right eye dominant. If not, then close your right eye. Do you see the object now? Then you are left eye dominant.

Simple, isn't it? So, if you have wondered about this, this will tell which is dominant. Now, considering how you aim and your eyesight, you can draw other conclusions about your playing.

tpdtom
05-16-2007, 05:04 AM
Now, the question is, what are you going to do with that information ? That's the real crux of the story...Tom

DoomCue
05-16-2007, 05:48 AM
Do you know how to tell which eye is dominant?

**SNIP**
Yes. Now that you know, forget about it.

-djb

Badhit
05-16-2007, 06:01 AM
Do you know how to tell which eye is dominant? I was shown a simple test at the eye doctor's that shows you which is the dominant eye.

Find an object about 8 feet from you, medium sized (nose sized), and put your hands out in front of you with palms facing away from you with fingers spread. Bring your hands together with index fingers overlapping to the first digit and your thumbs on the bottom same way until you have like a triangle.

Bring your hands up to focus on the object 8 feet away in the middle of the triangle with your hands.

Now, close your left eye, do you still see the object? If so, you are right eye dominant. If not, then close your right eye. Do you see the object now? Then you are left eye dominant.

Simple, isn't it? So, if you have wondered about this, this will tell which is dominant. Now, considering how you aim and your eyesight, you can draw other conclusions about your playing.


Another way of testing this is by making a small hole (about the size of a dime) in a sheet of paper and holding it with both hands at arms length if front of you. At this point focus with both eyes at an object in the distance through the hole. Then while still focusing on the selected object bring the paper toward you. You will pull the hole in the paper towards your dominant eye.

Now, the question is, what are you going to do with that information ? That's the real crux of the story...Tom

Being right handed and left eye dominant or vice versa is a curse if you are a pool player. This test could answer many questions if you are having problems with alignment ect.

DoomCue
05-16-2007, 06:12 AM
**SNIP**
Being right handed and left eye dominant or vice versa is a curse if you are a pool player. This test could answer many questions if you are having problems with alignment ect.
Please explain this "curse."

-djb

Badhit
05-16-2007, 06:25 AM
Please explain this "curse."

-djb

I have ran into this with newer players on more than one occasion. When attemping to hit center ball they hit a half tip to the right or left depending on there main hand. After showing them this test every one of them has had this problem. It can be overcome but it is better to know earlier rather than later when you are learning to play.

DoomCue
05-16-2007, 06:40 AM
I have ran into this with newer players on more than one occasion. When attemping to hit center ball they hit a half tip to the right or left depending on there main hand. After showing them this test every one of them has had this problem. It can be overcome but it is better to know earlier rather than later when you are learning to play.
So how does knowing about eye dominance, and specifically cross-dominance, have a bearing on getting a newer player to hit center ball?

-djb

seymore15074
05-16-2007, 06:41 AM
Please explain this "curse."

-djb

I already gave you rep for your first post this thread, so this time it's just a formal announcement:

Nice.

Rich93
05-16-2007, 07:10 AM
Being right handed and left eye dominant or vice versa is a curse if you are a pool player. This test could answer many questions if you are having problems with alignment ect.

I'd be very happy to be so cursed, like this man:

http://karwanphotos.com/images/Celebraties/WillieMosconi.jpg

acedotcom
05-16-2007, 07:11 AM
The simplest way is to point your finger at a corner of the room with both eyes open. Then, keeping it in line with the corner, draw that finger back toward your face. It will automatically wind up at your dominant eye.

Badhit
05-16-2007, 07:27 AM
So how does knowing about eye dominance, and specifically cross-dominance, have a bearing on getting a newer player to hit center ball?

-djb

I somewhat new here so I'm not sure if your genuinely interested or just drilling me. Anyway.. here are some links with testimonials that may exlpain it further.

http://billiardsdrills.com/archives/aim/find_your_dominant_eye.php

http://stason.org/TULARC/sports/billiard-pool/21-What-is-a-dominant-eye.html

http://www.billiardsdigest.com/ccboard/showthreaded.php?Cat=&Board=ccb&Number=228692&page=0&view=collapsed&sb=5&o=&vc=1

http://www.tableskills.com/article-kt2.php

End_Rail_Oneida
05-16-2007, 07:30 AM
Of all threads, I consider this one to be the luckiest of all, for me...

I will never have to take this test because I happen to be blind in my left eye...LMAO

But it does hinder my depth perception, just a little bit!

DoomCue
05-16-2007, 08:43 AM
I somewhat new here so I'm not sure if your genuinely interested or just drilling me. Anyway.. here are some links with testimonials that may exlpain it further.

http://billiardsdrills.com/archives/aim/find_your_dominant_eye.php

http://stason.org/TULARC/sports/billiard-pool/21-What-is-a-dominant-eye.html

http://www.billiardsdigest.com/ccboard/showthreaded.php?Cat=&Board=ccb&Number=228692&page=0&view=collapsed&sb=5&o=&vc=1

http://www.tableskills.com/article-kt2.php
I can tell you're new here due to your post count. I'm also drilling you because dominant eye doesn't really mean much to pool players. Look at your links closely. One says if you're cross-dominant to change which hand you shoot with (!), one says if you're not having a problem, don't worry about it, one is an Internet argument, and one just says line up under the dominant eye. None of these explain why they say what they do, and none of them explain whether they mean directly under the center of the dominant eye, or left edge, or right edge, or whatever. This tells me that these links are fairly useless. I know from the experience of teaching a lot of students that there are so many different ways to do things in pool that no one technique fixes all issues, including sighting. Plenty of players line up under their EAR, so how does a dominant eye come into play for them?

-djb

Blackjack
05-16-2007, 08:52 AM
In pool, both eyes are open and working in concert, not independent from each other. It as if the image is coming down two paths, but are viewed by you as one image inside your coconut. THERE IS NO WAY TO COMPENSATE FOR THIS. If one eye is weaker than the other, how would you be able to tell with both eyes open? Changing your alignemnt will not alter what your eyes are seeing or the strength or weakness of your eyes. You are going to see what you see. Dominant eye does not affect your pool playing one bit. I laugh at this debate every time it comes up in the forums as it serves no purpose when discussing pocket billiards - perhaps archery - but not pool.

MFB
05-16-2007, 09:02 AM
I can tell you're new here due to your post count. I'm also drilling you because dominant eye doesn't really mean much to pool players. Look at your links closely. One says if you're cross-dominant to change which hand you shoot with (!), one says if you're not having a problem, don't worry about it, one is an Internet argument, and one just says line up under the dominant eye. None of these explain why they say what they do, and none of them explain whether they mean directly under the center of the dominant eye, or left edge, or right edge, or whatever. This tells me that these links are fairly useless. I know from the experience of teaching a lot of students that there are so many different ways to do things in pool that no one technique fixes all issues, including sighting. Plenty of players line up under their EAR, so how does a dominant eye come into play for them?

-djb

I can tell you about 'the curse'.

I am right handed, left eye dominant.

Maybe I have the double curse since my right eye is substantially weaker than my left.

I can tell you from experience that I line up incorrectly many times, and miss balls I shouldn't miss. I call it point of aim. They go one direction, when I think I am aimed another direction. Straight shots are the worst. It doesn't happen on every shot, but more than I like.

Your brain is wonderful at making up for what my weaker eye cannot see. So you think you are lined up correctly, When you actually are not.

Can this be corrected by pre-shot routine? Of course. I need to play more.

MFB
05-16-2007, 09:09 AM
In pool, both eyes are open and working in concert, not independent from each other. It as if the image is coming down two paths, but are viewed by you as one image inside your coconut. THERE IS NO WAY TO COMPENSATE FOR THIS. If one eye is weaker than the other, how would you be able to tell with both eyes open? Changing your alignemnt will not alter what your eyes are seeing or the strength or weakness of your eyes. You are going to see what you see. Dominant eye does not affect your pool playing one bit. I laugh at this debate every time it comes up in the forums as it serves no purpose when discussing pocket billiards - perhaps archery - but not pool.


Are you right handed, left eye dominant, with a 'weaker' right eye?

I am. Sorry, but I humbly disagree with your comment.

This example might help explain my situation.

If your right handed, try aiming and using a jump cue closing your right eye.

Blackjack
05-16-2007, 09:17 AM
Are you right handed, left eye dominant, with a 'weaker' right eye?

I am. Sorry, but I humbly disagree with your comment.

This example might help explain my situation.

If your right handed, try aiming and using a jump cue closing your right eye.


First of all, I am right eye dominant. Second of all, it has nothing to do with pool at all. It only comes into question when you must use one eye. When you are using both eyes, the stronger will compensate for the weaker. You have no control over this. I refuse to close one eye to shoot a jump shot (or any shot) - however telling me that I have to do that only strengthens my argument.

MFB
05-16-2007, 09:46 AM
First of all, I am right eye dominant. Second of all, it has nothing to do with pool at all. It only comes into question when you must use one eye. When you are using both eyes, the stronger will compensate for the weaker. You have no control over this. I refuse to close one eye to shoot a jump shot (or any shot) - however telling me that I have to do that only strengthens my argument.

Actually, your brain compensates for your weaker eye.

The only point I was trying to make was that with a weaker right eye, I cannot properly aim a jump shot.

I agree both eyes are open and working in concert, not independent from each other.

I agree the image is coming down two paths, but are viewed by you as one image inside your coconut.

I can tell you that something goes on with my eye alignment on occasion that gets my over a ball incorrectly, and that is due to my eye dominance or weaker eye. I cannot comment about right eye dominance, or equal strength eyes because I have never had that experience. Maybe I will in my next life.

Eddie4269
05-16-2007, 10:47 AM
Do you know how to tell which eye is dominant? I was shown a simple test at the eye doctor's that shows you which is the dominant eye.

Find an object about 8 feet from you, medium sized (nose sized), and put your hands out in front of you with palms facing away from you with fingers spread. Bring your hands together with index fingers overlapping to the first digit and your thumbs on the bottom same way until you have like a triangle.

Bring your hands up to focus on the object 8 feet away in the middle of the triangle with your hands.

Now, close your left eye, do you still see the object? If so, you are right eye dominant. If not, then close your right eye. Do you see the object now? Then you are left eye dominant.

Simple, isn't it? So, if you have wondered about this, this will tell which is dominant. Now, considering how you aim and your eyesight, you can draw other conclusions about your playing.

Dominant Eye means almost NOTHING in pool.

As a matter of fact - you don't even have a domininant eye when you shoot pool unless you're shooting a straight in shot.

Don't beleive me?? Try this - place a ball on the spot, now place a cueball down table on the 50 yard line. Now line up and get down on the ball as if to cut it into the left hand corner, close one eye, then another - you'll be able to tell which eye is being "dominant" for this shot. Then aim as if your cutting it to the right hand corner and do the same thing. You'll notice the dominant eye changes!!!

That's right folks, your dominant eye changes depending on which direction you're cutting the object ball.

Badhit
05-16-2007, 10:56 AM
I can tell you're new here due to your post count. I'm also drilling you because dominant eye doesn't really mean much to pool players. Look at your links closely. One says if you're cross-dominant to change which hand you shoot with (!), one says if you're not having a problem, don't worry about it, one is an Internet argument, and one just says line up under the dominant eye. None of these explain why they say what they do, and none of them explain whether they mean directly under the center of the dominant eye, or left edge, or right edge, or whatever. This tells me that these links are fairly useless. I know from the experience of teaching a lot of students that there are so many different ways to do things in pool that no one technique fixes all issues, including sighting. Plenty of players line up under their EAR, so how does a dominant eye come into play for them?

-djb

Are you speaking for players you have delt with or players in general? If the later that's a pretty bold opinion on your part. I was just adding input
to the post from past experience in working with players with this condition. Tell someone that has this condition that it "doesn't really mean much to pool players" and I'm sure they will get very argumentative.

ps. thanks for the warm welcome

Curdog
05-16-2007, 11:01 AM
I shot right handed with left dominant eye for 45 years. Didn't present a problem to me at all!

ShaneT58
05-16-2007, 11:07 AM
I've never like the dominant eye debate either. I can do any of the test described to test which is my dominant eye and can make it either left or right by focusing either my left or right eye on what i'm looking at. Try the same test with your head turned about 45 degrees to either side of the object and see what kind of results you get. I can also pocket the balls just as easily holding the cue under my left eye, my chin, or my right eye. My natural alignment is with the cue between my chin and my right eye.

I have 20/20 vision with both eyes and have trouble aiming jumps shots properly too. Its because I haven't practiced them enough to get good at it. They look online to me and I miss to the same side everytime by about a 1/2 ball depending on how far way the shot is. I'll just learn to adjust like I did when I first learned to play. Its also harder to aim jump shots because you are jacked up and you can't really aim down the cue like on a normal shot. At least thats my excuse.

Mystick Cue Fan
05-16-2007, 11:07 AM
I don't play that good but one of my best qualities.....(if I have any) Is that I line up good with the balls. When I am playing good I can just line up and swing and have a pretty good percentage of making balls. Even though I'm left eye dom. and right handed. So I really doubt there is any curse in this.

Tony

MFB
05-16-2007, 11:19 AM
I've never like the dominant eye debate either. I can do any of the test described to test which is my dominant eye and can make it either left or right by focusing either my left or right eye on what i'm looking at. Try the same test with your head turned about 45 degrees to either side of the object and see what kind of results you get. I can also pocket the balls just as easily holding the cue under my left eye, my chin, or my right eye. My natural alignment is with the cue between my chin and my right eye.

I have 20/20 vision with both eyes and have trouble aiming jumps shots properly too. Its because I haven't practiced them enough to get good at it. They look online to me and I miss to the same side everytime by about a 1/2 ball depending on how far way the shot is. I'll just learn to adjust like I did when I first learned to play. Its also harder to aim jump shots because you are jacked up and you can't really aim down the cue like on a normal shot. At least thats my excuse.


Maybe my issue is that I say I am left dominant eye, and I am right handed. However my right eye, is probably like 20/100, so I could be a pirate.

DoomCue
05-16-2007, 11:55 AM
Are you speaking for players you have delt with or players in general? If the later that's a pretty bold opinion on your part. I was just adding input
to the post from past experience in working with players with this condition. Tell someone that has this condition that it "doesn't really mean much to pool players" and I'm sure they will get very argumentative.

ps. thanks for the warm welcome
I'm not speaking "for" anyone besides myself. As far as bold opinions go, I guess I have plenty. However, I am a BCA Recognized Instructor, and I've been giving lessons for quite some time, so my opinions are based on experience. My students range from complete beginners to open level players, and I've had to come up with a variety of techniques to help players.

Since you obviously feel dominant eye is important, under which part of the dominant eye should the cue be placed? If there's a one-size-fits-all solution, what is it?

I'm not sure why you characterize cross-dominance as a "curse" or a "condition." There's nothing abnormal about it; it's perfectly natural. You make it sound like they were born with a club foot. Ralf Souquet seems to shoot fairly well. If he followed the advice in one of your earlier links, he would've switched to shooting left-handed long ago. I guess he might've won some tournaments that way :rolleyes:

I'm not saying that having the cue under the dominant eye doesn't help some people. Having it there, though, doesn't mean that it works because that's the dominant eye - it's a red herring. Can you explain how Karen Corr, Earl Strickland, Neils Feijen, and others, play with the cue lined up under their EARS?

It's what you get used to, nothing more, nothing less.

PS Welcome to AZBilliards

-djb

NervousNovice
05-16-2007, 12:02 PM
Me:
I play right handed and have right dominant eye. I used to align my cue with the center of my chin. It somehow forces both eyes to work equally hard to create the 3D image. Later I align my cue more towards my dominant eye (I think it was because I saw Earl Strickland does that so I mimic, does he?) and let my brain do whatever it wants. I have a feeling that I rely on my dominant eye more but I don't bother.

My girlfriend:
She plays right handed and has left dominant eye. Her head is (to me) tilted like this man
http://karwanphotos.com/images/Celebraties/WillieMosconi.jpg
in order to align her dominant eye directly above her cue. It just seems awkward to me. I am not sure if that hurts performance or not (she is too novice to say).

My friend:
Right handed and don't know which eye is dominant. He aligns his cue directly under his chin. When he plays, I always feel that he aims the cue ball a bit to the right. He can still make shots, but probably because he compensated for the whole thing from the beginning.

A guy I saw:
Just close his other eye when he plays. I think that's the worst. You lack the 3D perception that your brain helps you put together.


P.S. I'm more interested in why people hold their cues with different hands, for instance, right handed person using left hand to hold cue.

PoolBum
05-16-2007, 12:24 PM
P.S. I'm more interested in why people hold their cues with different hands, for instance, right handed person using left hand to hold cue.

I'm right handed and I've naturally played pool left handed since the first time I picked up a cue. I thought I was playing right handed, and that therefore all the coordination for a shot was in the bridge hand, since I was bridging with my right hand.

One day I was playing this guy and he says to me, "Oh, a lefty eh?" I said, "No, I'm right handed." He tells me I'm shooting left handed and I didn't believe him at first, because there is absolutely nothing else I can do with any coordination with my left hand.

I've often wondered if this phenomenon is actually serendipitous for pool players because my dominant eye is my right eye, and since I shoot left handed my right eye is slightly more forward facing and more naturally aligned over the cue. I know Mike Sigel is also naturally right handed, but shoots pool left handed, and I've heard many conversations over the years about how this actually helped his game.

Marvel
05-16-2007, 12:49 PM
This is funny, especially the "curse" thing, as I'm suffering just opposite problem.

My dominant eye is my right eye. I'm also right handed. I've played for 18 years, and couple of years ago I realized that I'm 'shooting' with my left eye. So, now, I should be disciplined and patient and take my time to adjust my stance and the whole package, so I could have my right eye above the cue. Sometimes, especially now after I've realized it, I have my cue quite centered with my chin, but still mostly maybe 65-35 favouring the left eye. Maybe I should get this black "pirate" eye patch in front of my left eye for a while, so I couldn't have another choice but to adjust myself to play with my right eye. I'd guess in long shots and in long runs also, it matters, even some here says it wont..

The problem is, that my neck doesn't like if I try to turn my head. If you watch these old skool straight pool players, they seem to play similarly. Mosconi and Kelly at least, but then again, I don't know if they really have left eye dominant.

In pool, the distances are not so long, but in snooker I know they coach them nowadays from the junior level to favour heavily the dominant eye..

rackem
05-16-2007, 12:51 PM
I'd be very happy to be so cursed, like this man:

http://karwanphotos.com/images/Celebraties/WillieMosconi.jpg
I had lasik surgery to just my left eye.;) I am now left eye dominate. In a few more years I should be there.:D:D

scottycoyote
05-16-2007, 01:03 PM
what i do.......i put both eyes in a locked room and let em fight out, the eye that can walk out wins

pdcue
05-16-2007, 09:00 PM
I'm not speaking "for" anyone besides myself. As far as bold opinions go, I guess I have plenty. However, I am a BCA Recognized Instructor, and I've been giving lessons for quite some time, so my opinions are based on experience. My students range from complete beginners to open level players, and I've had to come up with a variety of techniques to help players.

Since you obviously feel dominant eye is important, under which part of the dominant eye should the cue be placed? If there's a one-size-fits-all solution, what is it?

I'm not sure why you characterize cross-dominance as a "curse" or a "condition." There's nothing abnormal about it; it's perfectly natural. You make it sound like they were born with a club foot. Ralf Souquet seems to shoot fairly well. If he followed the advice in one of your earlier links, he would've switched to shooting left-handed long ago. I guess he might've won some tournaments that way :rolleyes:

I'm not saying that having the cue under the dominant eye doesn't help some people. Having it there, though, doesn't mean that it works because that's the dominant eye - it's a red herring. Can you explain how Karen Corr, Earl Strickland, Neils Feijen, and others, play with the cue lined up under their EARS?

It's what you get used to, nothing more, nothing less.

PS Welcome to AZBilliards

-djb
Go find a BCA certified instructor of "how to shoot a rifle"
and ask him if he thinks dominant eye matters.

Dale

DoomCue
05-17-2007, 05:22 AM
Go find a BCA certified instructor of "how to shoot a rifle"
and ask him if he thinks dominant eye matters.

Dale
And if he tells you that you need to shoot the cue ball with a gun, his response might matter.

Apples and oranges.

-djb

Snorks
05-17-2007, 06:01 AM
Joe Tucker has a segment on the DVD when you buy the 3rd Eye Stroke Trainer. I will just say that what he says has helped me with dominant eye position. I will let him comment on what he has found, or you can buy his tool (it was worth the $$$ that I spent on it).

seymore15074
05-17-2007, 07:54 AM
I have a great idea. Send me $10, and I will tell you whether or not eye dominence matters. Then your money will be "well spent", because you will know for sure.

JoeW
05-17-2007, 08:13 AM
It is a straight forward empirical problem. Set up an agreed upon test shot that you make about 50% of the time. Here is one “test,” OB one diamond and ½” off the foot rail and CB one diamond off center on the head rail and one diamond from the head rail. Shoot alternating to the left and right pocket with center ball. Shoot each set of shots five times with your eye in various places for each run of ten. Keep track of the outcome.

Now you will “know” the best way for “you” to shoot for accuracy. During a game, if your shot is less than two feet and you calculate CB return then perhaps some other method of shooting is better. But it seems to me that you (whoever you are) should know in what way you are the most accurate on a length of the table shot.

Until you have run a test on a shot that you make about 50% of the time all you have is your opinion and your buddy’s opinion. We all know what that is worth.

BTW, I have learned that while I prefer to play with the stick under my chin slightly favoring the right eye, that I am most accurate playing with one eye for length of table shots where accuracy is important.

seymore15074
05-17-2007, 08:42 AM
It is a straight forward empirical problem. Set up an agreed upon test shot that you make about 50% of the time. Here is one “test,” OB one diamond and ½” off the foot rail and CB one diamond off center on the head rail and one diamond from the head rail. Shoot alternating to the left and right pocket with center ball. Shoot each set of shots five times with your eye in various places for each run of ten. Keep track of the outcome.

Now you will “know” the best way for “you” to shoot for accuracy. During a game, if your shot is less than two feet and you calculate CB return then perhaps some other method of shooting is better. But it seems to me that you (whoever you are) should know in what way you are the most accurate on a length of the table shot.

Until you have run a test on a shot that you make about 50% of the time all you have is your opinion and your buddy’s opinion. We all know what that is worth.

BTW, I have learned that while I prefer to play with the stick under my chin slightly favoring the right eye, that I am most accurate playing with one eye for length of table shots where accuracy is important.

I like this post. This is how to find out where the cue should be in relation to the eye...which is important. This post ignores the entire question of "eye dominence" and goes straight for what matters. Bravo.

pdcue
05-17-2007, 11:52 AM
And if he tells you that you need to shoot the cue ball with a gun, his response might matter.

Apples and oranges.

-djb

Aiming and aiming, or more technicaly, sighting and sighting.

I guessed you didn't understand that no other activity so closely
parallels sighting a pool shot properly as does aiming a rifle.
Except for the bending over part

DoomCue
05-17-2007, 02:04 PM
Aiming and aiming, or more technicaly, sighting and sighting.

I guessed you didn't understand that no other activity so closely
parallels sighting a pool shot properly as does aiming a rifle.
Except for the bending over part
I guess you don't understand the difference between "closely parallels" and "exactly the same." Sure, the two involve aiming, but the aiming is totally different.

There is a lot more depth perception required in pool than shooting. In shooting, you can place the sight on the target, thus creating a two dimensional image. In pool, that isn't possible; the cue ball would block the object ball. How do you achieve depth perception? You must use BOTH EYES.

Again, apples and oranges.

-djb

pdcue
05-18-2007, 06:09 PM
I guess you don't understand the difference between "closely parallels" and "exactly the same." Sure, the two involve aiming, but the aiming is totally different.

There is a lot more depth perception required in pool than shooting. In shooting, you can place the sight on the target, thus creating a two dimensional image. In pool, that isn't possible; the cue ball would block the object ball. How do you achieve depth perception? You must use BOTH EYES.

Again, apples and oranges.

-djb

You are seriously confused.
How do you think the cue ball could possibly 'block' your view of the OB?

Your major mistake is thinking depth perception is required.
You don't need any depth perception to shoot pool.

I am curently trying to retrain an old friend, he cain't make
a blind cut to save his life - but set up a shallow cut, OB close to
a rail, that is 4 times as dificult, and he pokes it in like a hanger.

Using depth perception to aim balls is a trap that will keep you from
ever learning how to aim/sight right.

Bob Jewett
05-18-2007, 06:54 PM
I have ran into this with newer players on more than one occasion. When attempting to hit center ball they hit a half tip to the right or left depending on their main hand. ...
If they were right-handed, which side did they usually line up on?

As for whether eye dominance is important, I don't know enough about vision to say one way or another, but I do know that some people have a real hard time finding the center of the cue ball, as Badhit has said.

If a player has certain symptoms, I think it may indicate head misalignment. In my experience, the symptoms include inability to place the tip at the real center of the cue ball, a swerving stroke, a tendency to always miss to one side, and frequent unintended side spin. Some people think that everyone will naturally put his head where the shot is seen accurately, but that is not true.

seymore15074
05-21-2007, 06:57 AM
Your major mistake is thinking depth perception is required.
You don't need any depth perception to shoot pool.
[...]
Using depth perception to aim balls is a trap that will keep you from
ever learning how to aim/sight right.

How can you make a kill shot if you do not know how far away the object ball is? ...and without a kill shot, forget about ever being any good at pool. Why is this being argued?

DoomCue
05-21-2007, 08:26 AM
You are seriously confused.
How do you think the cue ball could possibly 'block' your view of the OB?

Your major mistake is thinking depth perception is required.
You don't need any depth perception to shoot pool.

I am curently trying to retrain an old friend, he cain't make
a blind cut to save his life - but set up a shallow cut, OB close to
a rail, that is 4 times as dificult, and he pokes it in like a hanger.

Using depth perception to aim balls is a trap that will keep you from
ever learning how to aim/sight right.
I guess every good player in the country will now start playing with an eye patch, thanks to this fantastic advice.

-djb

Snapshot9
05-21-2007, 12:02 PM
Dominant Eye means almost NOTHING in pool.

As a matter of fact - you don't even have a domininant eye when you shoot pool unless you're shooting a straight in shot.

Don't beleive me?? Try this - place a ball on the spot, now place a cueball down table on the 50 yard line. Now line up and get down on the ball as if to cut it into the left hand corner, close one eye, then another - you'll be able to tell which eye is being "dominant" for this shot. Then aim as if your cutting it to the right hand corner and do the same thing. You'll notice the dominant eye changes!!!

That's right folks, your dominant eye changes depending on which direction you're cutting the object ball.

I am sorry, but you have this wrong. Just because you left eye has the best view to an object ball cutting to the right DOES NOT make it the dominant eye or vica versa. Many of your self-proclaimed experts should really get your eye doctor, a trained professional, to explain eye dominance to you. The only time eye dominance changes is if the dominant eye can not be corrected to as good as eyesight as the weaker eye, and your eyes automatically switch over eye dominance because the other eye focuses better on the object.

Just as you naturally become left or right handed as when you are young, you naturally become left or right eye dominant probably because of the eyesight you had when growing up. And like most things, it becomes second nature to you.

I would be willing to bet that there aren't .1% of all the pool players in the world that have had more problems with their eyes than I have had, and I have scarred corneas, with astigmatism in front and back of both eyes.
The best vision they could correct me to with contacts was 20/40, and less with glasses. I am happy to report though, after being switched to the newest and better soft contacts with astigmatism correction that I am now seeing 20/25 and there was only 2 letters on the 20/20 line I could not read. (after 9 appointments) For years and years when younger, I would memorize the eyechart line (20/40 line) because I could not even see that clearly, and I did not want to be classified 'legally blind' by the state (driver's license renewal).

If someone doesn't think depth perception matters, they should try going from contacts to glasses when playing. I can assure you it does come into play when aiming.

I have seen players that shoot with one hand and eye dominant in the other. There is a tall player that plays in some of the Shooters tournaments that is right handed but is left eye dominant. He is about a 7 speed on a 2-12 9 ball scale. He positions his left eye directly over his cue, and unconsciously tucks his cue under his chest with his wrist not in a straight line. The reason he does this is because he would see a different view of the object ball if his right eye was over the cue. I think that he must have a really weak right eye. His neck and shoulders are not square, and he has 'bent' lines in his stance in lieu of straight body lines. I would bet he has a lot of body aches after playing for long periods of time.

BTW, I chalk my cue with my left hand even though I am right handed.
It seems more natural especially since my right hand on the cue at the butt end most of the time, plus I was left handed until I was 3, and my Dad switched me over so I wouldn't be an oddball when playing baseball, our family sport, at the time. Left handed gloves were hard to find when
I was growing up. I, also, deal cards left handed.

pdcue
05-22-2007, 02:08 AM
How can you make a kill shot if you do not know how far away the object ball is? ...and without a kill shot, forget about ever being any good at pool. Why is this being argued?

Let me re-state, you don't need to use depth perception
to determine the aim point<target> on the OB

...kill shot, I assume you are talking about what many
players call a 'stun' shot - I do it plenty sporty, thanks for asking.

why is this being argued? - Like most arguments, two or more people
with two or more opinions - this point specifically, I am guessing
because a guy who, it would seem, has never seen the tremendous
and immediate improvement in potting that can be achieved by
nothing more than aligning the shaft under ones dominant eye,
wants to argue with someone who has.

Dale

pdcue
05-22-2007, 02:15 AM
I guess every good player in the country will now start playing with an eye patch, thanks to this fantastic advice.

-djb

Except for the ones who can read better than second grade level.

Dale

DoomCue
05-22-2007, 05:31 AM
Except for the ones who can read better than second grade level.

Dale
So is your eye patch on the left or the right?

-djb

Snapshot9
05-22-2007, 05:43 AM
Here is a good article on Eye Dominance:

http://www.madsci.org/posts/archives/dec98/912662561.Ns.r.html

:eek: :eek: :eek:

cuetechasaurus
05-22-2007, 06:35 AM
I was experimenting with closing my non-dominant eye before I get down on the shot. I helped me get on the right line alot more than just getting down on the shot and trying to aim from down there. I think it's better to aim and find the correct alignment before you get down, and focus on staying on that right line. Once that's all set, you take some practice strokes and just shoot.

pdcue
05-27-2007, 11:36 PM
And if he tells you that you need to shoot the cue ball with a gun, his response might matter.

Apples and oranges.

-djb

I was going to let this one die once you degenerated into sniping,
but I happened to take a look at Willie Mosconi's instructional
video. Early on, he is explaining how to aim..

His illustration of the concept - after some intro remarks on how to
line up for a shot:

"...now this is the same principle as firing a rifle.
When you fire a rifle, what do you do? You get the rifle here<lifts cue
up to his shoulder>. Look down that barrel, sight your target don't you?

This is the VERY SAME thing. The ONlY difference is, you're
holding your cuestick down low..."

You might want to check out this info, or not.

Dale