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PKM
06-25-2007, 10:48 AM
I'm not familiar with the game but want to try it for practice. If you are shooting by yourself, what kind of break do you open with?

If you want to keep track of a legitimate high run, what is the rule for sinking balls on the opening break?

I didn't know where to look for this info.

3andstop
06-25-2007, 11:15 AM
Hi, here is a good thread regarding the opening break. It even has a diagram posted down a few posts to visualize it.

http://forums.azbilliards.com/showthread.php?t=65372

You wouldn't be smacking the balls in straight pool as the opening break also requires you call your shot.

Some times I like to start my practice with a fully racked set of balls and open the break like the start of a regular game.

Other times I like to place a small rack of 6 balls on the table, break them lightly, try to run them out and have a break shot and then start counting my run from that break shot. There must be a zillion different ways to help keep your interest. :)

Bob Jewett
06-25-2007, 11:46 AM
I'm not familiar with the game but want to try it for practice. If you are shooting by yourself, what kind of break do you open with?

If you want to keep track of a legitimate high run, what is the rule for sinking balls on the opening break?

I didn't know where to look for this info.
If you want to use the same format that was used in the Derby City high run challenge, rack 14 balls, and put the 15th object ball and the cue ball where you please. (Well, almost. Those two balls can't be within 1 ball of any other ball.) Run as many as you can using standard 14.1 rules (calling all shots). When you miss, start from a fresh rack and break. This will give you a lot of practice at standard break shots, which will be good for your confidence in a real game.

The favorite first break shot at DCC for some players is one that you will not have in a normal game: put the object ball on the center spot and place the cue ball 6 inches away for a 45-degree cut into the side pocket. With a little follow, you are guaranteed to land between the two head balls and a scratch is unlikely.

To answer your specific rule about scoring, you must call each shot (ball and pocket) and if you pocket that ball in that pocket without fouling, you score a point for every ball pocketed on the shot.

PKM
06-25-2007, 11:53 AM
Aha, thanks. Do you have to call a shot on the break?

If you want to use the same format that was used in the Derby City high run challenge, rack 14 balls, and put the 15th object ball and the cue ball where you please. (Well, almost. Those two balls can't be within 1 ball of any other ball.) Run as many as you can using standard 14.1 rules (calling all shots). When you miss, start from a fresh rack and break. This will give you a lot of practice at standard break shots, which will be good for your confidence in a real game.

The favorite first break shot at DCC for some players is one that you will not have in a normal game: put the object ball on the center spot and place the cue ball 6 inches away for a 45-degree cut into the side pocket. With a little follow, you are guaranteed to land between the two head balls and a scratch is unlikely.

To answer your specific rule about scoring, you must call each shot (ball and pocket) and if you pocket that ball in that pocket without fouling, you score a point for every ball pocketed on the shot.

selftaut
06-25-2007, 12:16 PM
Aha, thanks. Do you have to call a shot on the break?

you will be racking 14 balls with one ball loose for the breakball , the breakball must be called to a pocket.

PKM
06-25-2007, 12:22 PM
you will be racking 14 balls with one ball loose for the breakball , the breakball must be called to a pocket.

Oh yeah
*smacks self in head*

Bob Jewett
06-25-2007, 12:28 PM
Aha, thanks. Do you have to call a shot on the break?
Selftaut already more or less answered your question, but yes, at 14.1 if you want to score on a shot, you must begin by calling a ball and pocket. There is no rule against calling a ball out of a full rack, and Mosconi is said to have played such shots in exhibitions and even in tournaments. If Willie could make the head ball in the side pocket more than 50% of the time, it was the right shot for him when he had to break.