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DrCue'sProtege
12-04-2007, 05:51 PM
what does everyone think of this instructional tape? is it worth having? can anyone give me an idea what its about? and how it can benefit your game?

DCP

p.s. please, no stupid replies, thanks.

Gregg
12-04-2007, 06:04 PM
Depends.

Is it for you or a friend of yours?

DrCue'sProtege
12-04-2007, 07:34 PM
it would be for me. as you can tell from the posts on here, i have no friends.

DCP

JoeyInCali
12-04-2007, 07:35 PM
It's a great video.
Same with the 60-minute workout.
http://youtube.com/watch?v=Udr1_y7Awqs&feature=related

DrCue'sProtege
12-04-2007, 07:37 PM
It's a great video.
Same with the 60-minute workout.
http://youtube.com/watch?v=Udr1_y7Awqs&feature=related

why is it great? can you give me an idea of what i can expect?

DCP

JoeyInCali
12-04-2007, 07:37 PM
Teaches you the X body stance.

poolplayer2093
12-04-2007, 07:43 PM
chances are you can expect knowledge. man i understand wanting to get a review of what you buy before you bite the bullet and order it. but from the sounds of your posts you're doing ok for yourself. you should just go ahead and get it. if it works it's a small price to pay for some improvement.

Irish634
12-04-2007, 07:59 PM
Actually, I am recommending that you don't get it DCP.

I haven't seen the video, so I can't say anything about it. But IMO, I don't think you should add another instruction to the mix.

What I mean is, you read and watch everything you can get your hands on. And there is no problem with that, but it can be very overwhelming. I am sure you have one helluva library.

My suggestion is to not buy the video and lock-up everything you have that is deemed instructional. Take ONE cue, lock the rest away. Then just play.

Just play the game. Forget about all the instruction, videos, books, etc that are running through your mind.

I'll challenge you to this:
Play for one month, with no interference of instruction, books, etc. Just play.

After one month, take the notes from your lesson with Scott and work on those things. But only take this instruction. Nothing else.

Get back to the basics.... Just play.

I think you could be amazed at what may happen.

poolplayer2093
12-04-2007, 08:15 PM
Actually, I am recommending that you don't get it DCP.

I haven't seen the video, so I can't say anything about it. But IMO, I don't think you should add another instruction to the mix.

What I mean is, you read and watch everything you can get your hands on. And there is no problem with that, but it can be very overwhelming. I am sure you have one helluva library.

My suggestion is to not buy the video and lock-up everything you have that is deemed instructional. Take ONE cue, lock the rest away. Then just play.

Just play the game. Forget about all the instruction, videos, books, etc that are running through your mind.

I'll challenge you to this:
Play for one month, with no interference of instruction, books, etc. Just play.

After one month, take the notes from your lesson with Scott and work on those things. But only take this instruction. Nothing else.

Get back to the basics.... Just play.

I think you could be amazed at what may happen.


that actually makes a lot of sense to me

cuejoey
12-04-2007, 08:20 PM
It is without a doubt one of the best tapes you can get..take your time and master the X and your game will dramatically improve..well worth the money from Bert Kinister..:)

av84fun
12-04-2007, 08:26 PM
Actually, I am recommending that you don't get it DCP.

I haven't seen the video, so I can't say anything about it. But IMO, I don't think you should add another instruction to the mix.

What I mean is, you read and watch everything you can get your hands on. And there is no problem with that, but it can be very overwhelming. I am sure you have one helluva library.

My suggestion is to not buy the video and lock-up everything you have that is deemed instructional. Take ONE cue, lock the rest away. Then just play.

Just play the game. Forget about all the instruction, videos, books, etc that are running through your mind.

I'll challenge you to this:
Play for one month, with no interference of instruction, books, etc. Just play.

After one month, take the notes from your lesson with Scott and work on those things. But only take this instruction. Nothing else.

Get back to the basics.... Just play.

I think you could be amazed at what may happen.

TAP...TAP...TAP

Having done a day with Scott I can tell you without reservation that you could and SHOULD work for an ENTIRE YEAR to make what you were taught second nature.

Then you will have a solid FOUNDATION to build on.

Without a solid foundation, you will get blown away...by your opponents.

I don't mean to dis Kinister and have several of his tapes but at the level I sense you to be, Irish is SPOT ON...you will get into sensory overload and be half-assed at a lot of things without having the nuts on any of them and that is the road to NOWHERE.

Regards,
Jim

poolplayer2093
12-04-2007, 08:32 PM
TAP...TAP...TAP

Having done a day with Scott I can tell you without reservation that you could and SHOULD work for an ENTIRE YEAR to make what you were taught second nature.

Then you will have a solid FOUNDATION to build on.

Without a solid foundation, you will get blown away...by your opponents.

I don't mean to dis Kinister and have several of his tapes but at the level I sense you to be, Irish is SPOT ON...you will get into sensory overload and be half-assed at a lot of things without having the nuts on any of them and that is the road to NOWHERE.

Regards,
Jim

but if your opponents don't have a solid foundation you'd probably stand a chance. from what everyone here says about needing to practice their fundamentals it seems like the competition would need as much work as well

Cuebacca
12-04-2007, 08:36 PM
If you have a few extra bucks to spend on your game, buy something that will improve the area that you constantly whine about..... THE BREAK! Please don't come back and tell me that your break is fine, because if it were, you wouldn't complain about your "bad spreads" all the time.

Next pool products for DCP are:

Charlie Bond's BreakRAK

Joe Tucker's Racking Secrets (in case you really do have a break great, it means you don't know what to look for in the rack)

And please don't come back after you bought them and say they didn't help. LOL.

Another post that will be ignored by DCP, I'm sure.

ceebee
12-04-2007, 08:55 PM
I favor the purchase of "The Mighty X". Without a truly "Straight Stroke" & the confidence to go with it, you will probably not reach the skill level you would care to attain.

The "Mighty X" is an Instructional tape about the address & the natural stroke gained through that setup process. If you do not like the Video, send it to me, I will purchase it from you & give it to one of my friends.

kildegirl
12-04-2007, 09:01 PM
Teaches you the X body stance. YOU HAVE GOT TO BE KIDDING. DO NOT WASTE YOUR MONEY.

kildegirl
12-04-2007, 09:18 PM
[QUOTE=DrCue'sProtege]what does everyone think of this instructional tape? is it worth having? can anyone give me an idea what its about? and how it can benefit your game?

DCP

AN IMAGINARY X IN THE CENTER OF THE TABLE ?

Scaramouche
12-05-2007, 06:09 AM
Bert Kinister Tight Pocket Workout
http://youtube.com/watch?v=De99jCUBO-k
http://youtube.com/watch?v=pRYfD9weMGs
http://youtube.com/watch?v=Gcg0pDeVc7I
http://youtube.com/watch?v=G6zBTXwTHGs

randyg
12-05-2007, 06:36 AM
Actually, I am recommending that you don't get it DCP.

I haven't seen the video, so I can't say anything about it. But IMO, I don't think you should add another instruction to the mix.

What I mean is, you read and watch everything you can get your hands on. And there is no problem with that, but it can be very overwhelming. I am sure you have one helluva library.

My suggestion is to not buy the video and lock-up everything you have that is deemed instructional. Take ONE cue, lock the rest away. Then just play.

Just play the game. Forget about all the instruction, videos, books, etc that are running through your mind.

I'll challenge you to this:
Play for one month, with no interference of instruction, books, etc. Just play.

After one month, take the notes from your lesson with Scott and work on those things. But only take this instruction. Nothing else.

Get back to the basics.... Just play.

I think you could be amazed at what may happen.

WOW...Mike I second this motion....SPF=randyg

Irish634
12-05-2007, 09:29 AM
WOW...Mike I second this motion....SPF=randyg

I'm glad I am not the only one that thinks this way! :D

kaznj
12-05-2007, 10:34 AM
He buys a piece of molding to draw a straight line the length of the diagonal of the table. Pro side of the pocket to pro side. Are you willing to draw a permanant line on your table. You could use chalk. You could use a table laser. You then practice straight in shots. This is very important to be able to do. A lesson with Scott Lee will do the same thing and a lot more. A good pro will correct problems in your stroke to enable you to practice a good straight shot. The pro will see what you are doing wrong. You may think you doing something correctly from a book or video, but you need someone to watch you. (You could video yourself). I appreciate when a teammate tells me I jumped up. I like that kind of feedback.

av84fun
12-06-2007, 04:03 PM
but if your opponents don't have a solid foundation you'd probably stand a chance. from what everyone here says about needing to practice their fundamentals it seems like the competition would need as much work as well

Yes, but if they don't work on fundamentals and you do, then your win percentage rises. Any form of practice without solid mechanics merely results in confusion (you miss a shot and have no idea why) and "grooving your flaws" which makes it progressively harder to adopt the correct mechanics.

You can't control your opponent's work on fundamentals...only your own. But you can count on them not practicing them as much as they should!

Regards,
Jim

Mark Avlon
12-06-2007, 05:57 PM
The Mighty X will be of little or no value to you.

You would do better to work on progressive practice (http://www.sfbilliards.com/progpract.pdf) drills for the skills you wish to improve. If you think about what you want to work on, you can come up with your own progressive practice drills.

If you have trouble coming up with your own, you might consider the Billiards Workbook (http://www.fivestarbilliards.com/thestore/prods/BilliardsWorkbook.html). It has enough drills to keep you busy for the rest of your life.

Scottster
12-06-2007, 06:34 PM
The Mighty X will be of little or no value to you.



No one on here has given a good example of what the Mighty X involves. I guarantee everyone on here that DCP would obtain something from this video instruction (if he would apply himself). No way is he at the skill level to have mastery of the cueball this drill teaches (not a slam on DCP either).

For those that know the Mighty X and are afraid of marking up your table, I suggest using thread from each corner then use re-enforcement holes to mark the table on the spots recommended in the video, then remove the thread, then use a sharpie to make tiny marks inside the re-enforcements so that you can set the shots up again and again even after the re-enforcements are removed.

I think the "Mighty X" is one of Bert's best tapes and well worth the price. You have to apply and practice the information on the video it is worthless to just watch it. I am not going to explain the drill(s) on this video in detail because I dont think it is fair to Bert.

Mark Avlon
12-06-2007, 07:12 PM
What did you learn from the The Mighty X?

Bert doesn't teach what it takes to execute the shots he shoots other than to cheat the pocket. Does he explain how to get two diamonds of draw to get back to the line? No. When he gets out of line, he shoots a drag shot to keep the cue ball close the the line, but he doesn't say that. The Mighty X will simply frustrate those with out the knowledge or skills necessary to keep a run going. Only the determined will figure it out and it won't be quick.

Bob Jewett
12-06-2007, 07:20 PM
No one on here has given a good example of what the Mighty X involves. I guarantee everyone on here that DCP would obtain something from this video instruction (if he would apply himself). No way is he at the skill level to have mastery of the cueball this drill teaches (not a slam on DCP either)....
I don't think that DCP or other players would learn nothing from the X, but there are much better exercises/drills/practice to spend your time on. You should practice shots that you routinely encounter in play and have trouble with. The X is not very high on that list. Doing it well will give you a feeling of accomplishment, but so will making a spot shot that is also a stop shot.

Similarly, I think it is not much use to practice shooting balls that are frozen to the cushion. Sure, you encounter them, but not in the same quantity that some people would have you practice them. If you miss them in games, practice them, but otherwise spend your time mastering more common shots.

Scottster
12-06-2007, 07:57 PM
What did you learn from the The Mighty X?

I learned what is involved to control the center of the table with my stroke. I learned how important it is to be on the correct side of the ball to maintain control of the center of the table. I learned how to achieve the center of the table using different english to get back in line.

Bert doesn't teach what it takes to execute the shots he shoots other than to cheat the pocket.

He offers a challenging drill for students of the game to elevate their game.

The Mighty X will simply frustrate those with out the knowledge or skills necessary to keep a run going.

The "X" offers a platform for a dedicated student of the game to learn these skills and gain the knowledge necessary to execute the drill.

Only the determined will figure it out and it won't be quick.

Quality pool takes determination. The reason pool is on the decline is because a high level of play is not obtained "quickly". The younger generations don't find instant gratification in their level of play. Therefore they go play videogames.
The majority of people willing to purchase pool training tapes have the the determination to get better. This video offers a drill that will improve a player If They Put Forth The Effort!

bagofpaper
12-06-2007, 08:54 PM
it would be for me. as you can tell from the posts on here, i have no friends.

DCP

awwww...:(

hejests
12-06-2007, 08:59 PM
A little off topic... but is it just me or does kinister remind everyone else of nick nolte too? Maybe it's the intensity I dunno.

CreeDo
12-06-2007, 09:25 PM
The X is a good drill and you should buy the tape.

Here's how it works (and I'm not trying to spoil it for anyone, if you plan to buy the tape then maybe disregard this and just get it straight from the horse's mouth)
--
You mark the table in order to find the exact way to place the balls, with diagonal lines running from the center of one corner to the center of the furthest opposite corner. Without very exact ball placement, the drill is less valuable.


Place balls as shown, start at the center of the table, and shoot one of the balls dead straight into the corner, and try to draw back to exactly the center of the table. You must do this with NO practice strokes, which is the tough part. You must address the pall carefully and perfectly and then stroke carefully and perfectly. If you make it back pretty near the center, repeat for the remaining 3 balls. If you get out of line to the point where you leave the 'box' or hit a rail or whatever, reset. The order you shoot them in makes a difference in how much recovery you're able to do once you get out of line... so maybe arrange them at random and shoot from lowest numbered to highest or whatever.

If you get all 4 and can get the cue ball back to the center, replace the 4 and try to do another set. If you can make it through 3 sets you're probably a champion.

http://www.jessescornerpocket.com/mighty_x.jpg

2 things to focus on:
- hit dead center of the cue ball and dead center of the object ball, so that the CB goes straight back instead of veering a bit to either side
- carefully control the speed of the draw so that it's the same each time.

Remember - 0 practice strokes.

cuejoey
12-07-2007, 12:20 AM
If you use the X drill you do not have to draw lines on the table..i used a lead pencil to put 4 dots on the table as the startting points.this was after stringing string to determine the straight line from pocket to pocket..eventually after hitting a few thousand balls your cloth will develop a worn type of look for the lines ..i then used the ORIGINAL Quick Clean spray cloth cleaner by Dave Hodges..after spraying and cleaning the table twice with this product the cloth looked like new again...:)

DrCue'sProtege
12-07-2007, 10:18 AM
The X is a good drill and you should buy the tape.

Here's how it works (and I'm not trying to spoil it for anyone, if you plan to buy the tape then maybe disregard this and just get it straight from the horse's mouth)
--
You mark the table in order to find the exact way to place the balls, with diagonal lines running from the center of one corner to the center of the furthest opposite corner. Without very exact ball placement, the drill is less valuable.


Place balls as shown, start at the center of the table, and shoot one of the balls dead straight into the corner, and try to draw back to exactly the center of the table. You must do this with NO practice strokes, which is the tough part. You must address the pall carefully and perfectly and then stroke carefully and perfectly. If you make it back pretty near the center, repeat for the remaining 3 balls. If you get out of line to the point where you leave the 'box' or hit a rail or whatever, reset. The order you shoot them in makes a difference in how much recovery you're able to do once you get out of line... so maybe arrange them at random and shoot from lowest numbered to highest or whatever.

If you get all 4 and can get the cue ball back to the center, replace the 4 and try to do another set. If you can make it through 3 sets you're probably a champion.

http://www.jessescornerpocket.com/mighty_x.jpg

2 things to focus on:
- hit dead center of the cue ball and dead center of the object ball, so that the CB goes straight back instead of veering a bit to either side
- carefully control the speed of the draw so that it's the same each time.

Remember - 0 practice strokes.

thanks Creedo.

i doubt i am interested in that tape now. i've actually done something similar to this before. i might give it a whirl again, see how i do without any practice strokes. but to spend $$$ for this isnt really worthwhile to me since i've already seen it and done it.

DCP