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Peer
03-14-2008, 03:15 AM
Last night, as I was playing someone way better than I (lets call him "Robert Blewit"), I was thinking how I'm such a non-competitive person -- win or lose -- yet, it's always fun to play my arch enemy Bobby, one the most knowable players of our time.

Hence, I'm curious how other people feel when not playing your best while being up against a tours de force.

-- peer

Gerry
03-14-2008, 03:43 AM
good question! a few times a week for about 3 years I played a world beater. I NEVER asked for weight, didn't care what game...mostly 14.1, I just kept playing and getting my head bashed in. I went through a progression during the time we played like this.....

>first I was in awe because I had no chance of doing what he was doing on the table.

>next I was a sponge learning everything I could, and still never could win.

>after a year the awe wears off, I'm learning a ton! and I'm able to relax and shoot MY game, but I still have no shot.

>at 2 years I'm PISSED! I'm sick of losing, and I have more confidence. I'm running 40's/60's everyday and all I gotta do is put 2 together to win.

>around 3 years I win a race to 7 now n then, maybe 1 out of 4. I ran my first 100 in there somewhere, and I'm almost a player;)

>this was about the time I made my biggest jump as a player. I could go anywhere, and play whomever because I have seen the best play EVERYDAY and no one scares me anymore. THAT is the one thing that freed me from worrying about playing great players.

Roy Steffensen
03-14-2008, 03:50 AM
I want to win everytime, no matter how I feel, no matter who I play.

Sometimes I can be satisfied if I play good but have lost, but I will be more satisfied if I win even if I play bad.

predator
03-14-2008, 05:30 AM
One thing I noticed playing against these strong A class runout like a machine shortstop near pro players (call them what you like) or pro players is that you absolutely must make sure you play your push out shot correctly. If they take the shot you have given them, the rack is basically over. You have to push out to a jump or a kick. Then they usually give you the shot back thinking you'll mess up...sometimes they're wrong...:D
In 9ball normal set length a very small chance is actually there, but 14.1...literally zero chance of success.

I love playing these guys because you learn something new every time.

Da Poet
03-14-2008, 06:00 AM
What's most important when playing someone way better than you?

Having fun!

Have a good attitude and everything else will fall into place. :D

TATE
03-14-2008, 07:06 AM
Last night, as I was playing someone way better than I (lets call him "Robert Blewit"), I was thinking how I'm such a non-competitive person -- win or lose -- yet, it's always fun to play my arch enemy Bobby, one the most knowable players of our time.

Hence, I'm curious how other people feel when not playing your best while being up against a tours de force.

-- peer

The most important thing is to be a good sport regardless of the outcome.

Chris

arsenius
03-14-2008, 07:26 AM
I picked "as long as I play well." I wanted to say "as long as I learn something" but that would have been dishonest. I don't really feel that way.;-)

But, I think when I have played people way better than me, I have learned a lot in the times that I played well.

For example, I played Shin Park once. I won 4 games (race to 9, but I had a 1 game handicap). I was happy with the result, because--to the extent of my abilities--I didn't give the match away. The four games I won, I got out realy nicely. I had one really difficult runout that I made it through. It's one of the few runouts I've ever made, that I can actually remember clearly.

There were two games where I missed the 8 ball. Makeable shots, but not hangers. If I made those, the score might have been 6-7, and from there who knows? (maybe I would have scratched on the next break, and he would have run out the set...)

Anyways, I learned that I don't have to be nervous when playing such giants. I have a chance, even if it is a small one, to win. At least I can get my licks in. So, for me, my experience is that if I play well in these situations, I will probably learn something along the way.

magix
03-14-2008, 09:02 AM
when playing someone better than you,you have to win the first game you have a chance to win.if you dog the first one.your done.this does not mean you will win the set,however you will fight hard.if you choke,the first chance you have to win, it will eat at you and you have no,zero,nothing chance.

Mike Templeton
03-14-2008, 09:34 AM
I'd say the most important thing is not to beat yourself. Make them do it.

Speed kills speed, so even if someone is a good player, they don't always play their best against a better opponent. I don't know how many times I have heard, "I had that great player beat, and I dogged a shot", or "I dogged position", or "I had him 5-2 in a race to 9 and let him come back and beat me".

Ultimately, all of these defeats had alot to do with beating ones self.

Mike

rogerb
03-14-2008, 09:48 AM
Two most importants things
1) Believe in myself .. I can beat this person
2) Remind myself that a great defense is sometimes better than a great shot (sometimes we want to impress the better player with our ability and overlook a defense)

Klopek
03-14-2008, 01:47 PM
0000000000

crappoolguy
03-14-2008, 01:50 PM
I don't care if I lose as long as I played well. I always try to learn things when playing against better players.

pooljunkie4ever
03-14-2008, 02:11 PM
I would add, it doesn't matter how I play as long as I am competitive.

If you play a player better than yourself, let say in a weekly tournament, if you are competitive and almost beat him, than he will have respect for you the next time, which in turn might cause him to have more errors.

TheNewSharkster
03-14-2008, 02:21 PM
In my exp the most important thing when playing a better player is to not try to outshoot them. Play a defense oriented game. Don't get me wrong, if you see a run out go for it. If the run out looks difficult force them to kick at the ball and pray for good position or a ball in hand.

The King
03-14-2008, 04:31 PM
Was as long as I learn something that is most important to me I'm always walking away from the table asking myself where I could of done better what I did wrong ... Don't get me wrong I want to win too that is important and I want to play my best ... But I can't always do that ... I can learn something every time though ...

ribdoner
03-14-2008, 04:39 PM
WHEN PLAYING SOMEONE MUCH BETTER:


Don't miss...

SJDinPHX
03-14-2008, 10:35 PM
Last night, as I was playing someone way better than I (lets call him "Robert Blewit"), I was thinking how I'm such a non-competitive person -- win or lose -- yet, it's always fun to play my arch enemy Bobby, one the most knowable players of our time.

Hence, I'm curious how other people feel when not playing your best while being up against a tours de force.

-- peer
I want to play your buddy "Bumpypickle" some head up DRAW THE BALL!
I will be in the bay area this coming week. Put up or shut up.

Dick

PS. My minimum wager is $500,000 dollars!

Travis Bickle
03-14-2008, 10:54 PM
Run out when you can, play smart when it's there and don't worry, is the way I try to look at it. If you're getting a reasonable handicap, you may win. If not, hopefully you make a decent showing, and if the crazy chance comes, you win then, too.

Other nite I was in a spot I usually fold. Playing an A-category player in front of the railbirds, but getting the 6, because I yam what I yam. I was down 2-0 in about 30 secs, but things turned when I made a decent runout. Pressure shifted and next thing you know, I won 7-3.

Any way, whatever the score, I hope I learn something! Could be about me, could be about the game.

longhair
03-14-2008, 11:04 PM
Playing that particular guy, learn whatever you can. He probably isn't charging you much.

Give respect where it is deserved...

JoeyA
03-14-2008, 11:15 PM
I want to win everytime, no matter how I feel, no matter who I play.

Sometimes I can be satisfied if I play good but have lost, but I will be more satisfied if I win even if I play bad.

I have to side with you Roy. I'd rather win no matter what. :o

A loss is more tolerable if I played well but it is still a loss and I don't like losing. A win with mediocre play is better than above average play and a loss. Now just let me play a perfect game and still lose and you'll think I'm imitating a steam engine. :D
JoeyA

gobrian77
03-15-2008, 01:09 AM
When I'm playing someone much better than me in my home, I like to mix up a batch of Manhattens and toss an extra shot of bourbon in his (yes, bourbon- can't get rye on the island:p )- after a couple of rounds, things start to even up.;)

conetip
03-15-2008, 06:32 AM
Played a guy last night at a local bar. I broke the 1st game , got zip, he ran it. Then he broke and ran the table.So after 4 games of this he misses and had a bad leave. q and 8 and his 1 in a close pack. I was thinking of some kind of safety. However he surprisingly coached me into a shot I thought I could not do. Tried the english to the right off a rail to make a ball in the corner. made it.Then gave me a guide to win the game. I did it , but would not have without his guidance of the 1st shot.
I still lost other games , but learned something for the 50c lessons.
I even managed a break and run. We made it alternate break to stop the break and run, but I did it. Very happy with the essentially free lessons.
Neil

Gregg
03-15-2008, 08:38 AM
If the other player is truly more skilled than you, and you have the great fortune of playing them, it would be a disservice not to take an opportunity to learn something.

bumpypickle
03-15-2008, 09:25 PM
Last night, as I was playing someone way better than I (lets call him "Robert Blewit"), I was thinking how I'm such a non-competitive person -- win or lose -- yet, it's always fun to play my arch enemy Bobby, one the most knowable players of our time.

Hence, I'm curious how other people feel when not playing your best while being up against a tours de force.

-- peer
Nothing will make you feel better than buying the guy that is nice enough to play with a player such as yourself a nice fat dinner. Sizzler, Round Table, Outback, etc,. The better palyer also gets to keep the leftovers. bumpypickle.

Peer
03-16-2008, 06:43 AM
Nothing will make you feel better than buying the guy that is nice enough to play with a player such as yourself a nice fat dinner.

Hey Chris, I'd happily buy you a nice dinner as long as you promise to not fart up the place after.

-- peer

sjm
03-16-2008, 07:13 AM
Nice thread. In my view, the most important things when you play a stronger player:

Play within yourself and stick to the percentages
This sounds simple but is actually quite difficult. Don't let a stronger player cause you to abandon your game plan. Rather than trying to be someone you are not, try to maximize your execution of what you know and what you are good at. Stick to the game plan

Pay attention: don't reduce your concentration when opponent shoots, or you squander some chances to learn
Be as attentive as possible when opponent is shooting, studying both opponent's conceptualization and execution.

Dare to ask the occasional question of the stronger player and invite critique. You'd be surprised just how willing better players are to help. Questions like these pay great dividends in the learning process:
a) Would you be kind enough to mention it if I do anything that you feel is ill-advised?
b) Did I play the right shot/stroke/speed there? If not, what other choices were available?
c) How did you choose between the shot/pattern/sequence you just played and some of the other available choices?

Stay Composed and Dignified
and, as Tate noted "The most important thing is to be a good sport regardless of the outcome."

That's how I see it.

Drawman623
03-16-2008, 07:58 AM
Don't make their mistakes.

DeepBanks
03-16-2008, 08:09 AM
WHEN PLAYING SOMEONE MUCH BETTER:


Don't miss...


Truer words were never spoken . . . course, you're assuming you got to go to the table.

suckershot
03-16-2008, 10:29 AM
Clearly, what's most important when playing someone way better than you is to lie, cheat, and steal. And then, if you are accused of doing any of the aforementioned, remember this: deny, deny, indignation. :D

SCCues
03-16-2008, 11:25 AM
Don't think about how well they play.

Try not to make silly mistakes.

Take advantage of every shot you get and make the most of it.

If all of that still isn't enough make sure you can say that you did your best and try harder next time.

James

crosseyedjoe
03-16-2008, 08:49 PM
One of the reason why Pool has not have some luck to be officially included as main Olympics sport, is the nature of the game. Unless you are playing players like Darrel Peach, pool is usually you against the layout of the table. You never actually go toe-to-toe with your opponent. So it doesn't really matter much the skill of the player you are playing against. Every game is a test of your own skill.

Southpaw
03-16-2008, 09:03 PM
I think its very important to always try and learn something whenever you play period. You can learn alot when you are playing well and you can learn alot when you are playing poorly.

Southpaw

Mike_Mason
03-16-2008, 09:16 PM
Don't play a better player for money.

If you are playing better players in tournaments just try your best to win the matches. If you win it's a feather in your cap. If you lose just hope you gave it your best shot...if not work on that...and maybe next time you'll do better...don't give up and keep trying. It's no shame to play your best and lose to a better player. Work on cutting down your unforced errors.

If you have the opportunity to play a better player for no stakes...play as much as he/she will allow and learn from what you see...and ask questions...most players will explain things that might be routine for them but new to you. Work and practice on those new concepts. Just take advantage of a great opportunity to sharpen your game because playing tough players will make you tough.

Mike

Peer
03-17-2008, 02:36 AM
One of the reason why Pool has not have some luck to be officially included as main Olympics sport, is the nature of the game. Unless you are playing players like Darrel Peach, pool is usually you against the layout of the table. You never actually go toe-to-toe with your opponent. So it doesn't really matter much the skill of the player you are playing against. Every game is a test of your own skill.

So then, why is it that quite a few other Olympic sports, like archery, shooting, equestrian, diving, are even less "toe-to-toe with your opponent"..? Actually, with its defensive safety-play, pool is more like slow tennis than any of the sports listed above, and hence, in pool it DOES really matter who you are playing against.

-- peer

!Smorgass Bored
03-17-2008, 05:42 AM
" What's most important when playing someone way better than you? "


Hide some money in your shoe or safety-pin some inside your drawers..... or sleep in the street.
And, unless you're hustling from bar to bar and need the quarters, always fill all your car ashtrays (and any other crook & nanny) with pocket change. It gets hungry learning to WIN... imo
Doug