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View Full Version : Promoting pro pool pros and cons, I need your opinions.


bfdlad
04-28-2008, 05:57 PM
Ok , as some of you know I have been promoting pro pool schools, challenge matches and exhibitions herein the Phoenix area. I also played a small part in the Desert Shoot out this past week. After the uncertainty and confusion that took place with this event it worked out VERY well. This got me to thinking (don't start with the wise cracks). From my experience and research I have found the reason why we do not have more Pro pool going on. The reason is the expense of promoting a world class event and the risks financially that are involved for the promoter. There are alot of details that come into play that puts the promoter out there with is wallet on the block. The best conditions that we can hope for are ar the Sheraton or the casino or the MGM etc. This takes soooo much $$ and with only the hope that you may get it back when you count in the additional $$ that is a fixed cost or payed in advance. Some of these things are hotels wanting a 50 room block for you to be able to hold the event their (advance payment) production costs (advance payment) Staffing costs (fixed cost) the added $20 to $25k $$ that has to be recouped in sponsorship etc that goes out before anyone shows up. The way our economy and industry is right now that ain't east to make back. This is why so many new or even seasoned promoters back away from deals because there is so much $$ out there and a hard job ahead that it just isn't worth it in alot of cases. Charlie, Berman, Matchroom, Hopkins etc may be the exception. I think you can see the position the promoter is in. SO for the time being, can we do more Pro events in NICE local pool rooms to just make the events happen? The more they happen the more interest we get locally the more interest the more people will pay attention. Then the sponsorship $$ will come, this way the Playeres get their chance at the $$, the pool room gets additional $$, the promoter gets $$ and the fans get to dee more pool and billiards in their local room at a level they may not see ever in some cases. This is a plan I would like to follow through on, However I need you guys advice on this. I respect most peoples opinion on here and would value some one saying "Mark you are smoking crack" or " Hey man you may have the right idea there" Either way I think it works. Sorry to ramble but I want the sport to roll better than it is in the current state. This may be the answer for now and to build it AGAIN> I'm all in unless you all flame me and tell me I'm a dumbass.

CocoboloCowboy
04-28-2008, 06:07 PM
Sponsorship is the key,sponsors have that GREEN STUFF and delivering what you promise to deliever at an event, schools, etc. is also another key to success. IMHO.

Actions speak louder than broken promises.

bfdlad
04-28-2008, 06:20 PM
Sponsorship is the key,sponsors have that GREEN STUFF and delivering what you promise to deliever at an event, schools, etc. is also another key to success. IMHO.

Actions speak louder than broken promises.
I just want you to know, that the way that came out sounded like you were insinuating that I had broken promises before and that I had to prove myself. I know that is not what you meant so please clarify for me plese Bruce before people get the wrong idea of me. Again, I know thtas not what you meant though. the "actions speak louder than words part" maybe it's just me.

StevenPWaldon
04-28-2008, 06:54 PM
OMG, paragraphs! Please!

Fatboy
04-28-2008, 07:16 PM
OMG, paragraphs! Please!

i like Mark, I feel bad I didnt make it to the pool school as promised too, i havent left my house in 10-12 days I cant, backache is terrible, anyways, yes for God's sake paragraphs Mark!!!!, even in the wrong spot they make things readable.

bfdlad
04-28-2008, 09:14 PM
i like Mark, I feel bad I didnt make it to the pool school as promised too, i havent left my house in 10-12 days I cant, backache is terrible, anyways, yes for God's sake paragraphs Mark!!!!, even in the wrong spot they make things readable.
I can't believe I am getting grammar lessons from Fatboy. 2nd I have a LV bag filled with $$ for you and the coin flip. 3rd I was playing pool when they went over the whole paragraph thing in school. How u doing fatboy??? If you can't drive please can I use one of your cars for a bit?? Last thing oh hold on paragraph


How u doing man? I hope all is well, I will be waiting til you get on your feet ant the flip is on and you will be my little B*&ch. Give me a cal I have been sweating JA's matches an Snipers matches. Steve Moore is cool and we ate dinne r with JA three tmes ribs ribs and mo ribs baby.

justnum
04-28-2008, 09:23 PM
Just do what everyone else is doing. This way you don't have to figure it out. Just apply the idea.

mullyman
04-28-2008, 09:27 PM
I like the idea of having the pro tour show up in local rooms. Only thing is the condition of the tables. I think one good idea would be to have staff show up a few days beforehand and go over all the tables, new felt, tighten down the bolts etc... Make them ready for the pros. Not only would it be good for the pros but the pool room would get their tables fixed and cleaned up.

If you look at the pro bowling tour they play in local rooms, excpet for huge major events where they will set up lanes outside or in some kind of arena setting. Pool should be the same. Have a national tour that goes into local pool rooms and save the major events for the hotel settings.

But again, sponsorship is the key and the money just isn't there for pool. Sad, very sad.
MULLY

MikeJanis
04-28-2008, 10:09 PM
Here are some ideas from Viking Tour events that I use.

At all of the events I run I bring balls (Aramith Super Pro's with the Pro Cup Cue Ball) . This makes the playing conditions a little better when its the same at each event.

At my BIG events (Nationals, SCO and such) Not only do I bring Brand New Aramith Super Pro's but I have every tournament table covered with my sponsors cloth (Championship Tour Edition).

We also hang banners from our sponsors to give it a tournament atmosphere.

Whenever possible we put bleachers in place or simply rearrange the tables and seating to accomodate the spectators and players.

At every tournament table during the larger Pro events the Viking Tour/Host Location provides fresh cups, drinking water and a towel for the players.

I have been following these traditions since 1995 and it seems to work pretty good.


Good Luck,

Mj

CocoboloCowboy
04-29-2008, 04:58 AM
I just want you to know, that the way that came out sounded like you were insinuating that I had broken promises before and that I had to prove myself. I know that is not what you meant so please clarify for me plese Bruce before people get the wrong idea of me. Again, I know thtas not what you meant though. the "actions speak louder than words part" maybe it's just me.

Nope you read it worng, or took that wrong. So I will make it simpler.

Deliver what you promise, and everyone will be happy.

Get sponsors.

When I said: "Actions speak louder than broken promises." = Deliver what you promise, and everyone will be happy. Like a product that works as advertised.

Gerry
04-29-2008, 06:24 AM
Local events at "hometown" pool rooms are GREAT! I worked at "the cue corner" here in PA. for a few years and we had an annual 14.1 event that had World Champs show up every year like.....Rempe, Sigel, Hopkins, Barouti, Maidhoff, Colovito, Polo, Garcia.....all in an 8 table room! This tourney had its 20th anniversary last year!

heres a link>>> http://www.thebilliardstour.com/archives/tournament-14-1-2008.html

My good friend Micky owns the room now in a new location and it's better then ever. Sure, Pete Sinkler has put $$$ into that event EVERY year, but I would bet its a small amount compared to putting on an event at a casino or whatever, and you will still get the top flight Pros out to play!!:D

If I were putting on a tourney I would make sure the room owner is taken care of first.....(we can't sell beer or liquor in pool room here in PA) so giving up his room for a day or 2 is tough on them. We used to charge $10 to get in and watch, which is CHEAP IMO to see those guys play!

ironman
04-29-2008, 06:26 AM
Ok , as some of you know I have been promoting pro pool schools, challenge matches and exhibitions herein the Phoenix area. I also played a small part in the Desert Shoot out this past week. After the uncertainty and confusion that took place with this event it worked out VERY well. This got me to thinking (don't start with the wise cracks). From my experience and research I have found the reason why we do not have more Pro pool going on. The reason is the expense of promoting a world class event and the risks financially that are involved for the promoter. There are alot of details that come into play that puts the promoter out there with is wallet on the block. The best conditions that we can hope for are ar the Sheraton or the casino or the MGM etc. This takes soooo much $$ and with only the hope that you may get it back when you count in the additional $$ that is a fixed cost or payed in advance. Some of these things are hotels wanting a 50 room block for you to be able to hold the event their (advance payment) production costs (advance payment) Staffing costs (fixed cost) the added $20 to $25k $$ that has to be recouped in sponsorship etc that goes out before anyone shows up. The way our economy and industry is right now that ain't east to make back. This is why so many new or even seasoned promoters back away from deals because there is so much $$ out there and a hard job ahead that it just isn't worth it in alot of cases. Charlie, Berman, Matchroom, Hopkins etc may be the exception. I think you can see the position the promoter is in. SO for the time being, can we do more Pro events in NICE local pool rooms to just make the events happen? The more they happen the more interest we get locally the more interest the more people will pay attention. Then the sponsorship $$ will come, this way the Playeres get their chance at the $$, the pool room gets additional $$, the promoter gets $$ and the fans get to dee more pool and billiards in their local room at a level they may not see ever in some cases. This is a plan I would like to follow through on, However I need you guys advice on this. I respect most peoples opinion on here and would value some one saying "Mark you are smoking crack" or " Hey man you may have the right idea there" Either way I think it works. Sorry to ramble but I want the sport to roll better than it is in the current state. This may be the answer for now and to build it AGAIN> I'm all in unless you all flame me and tell me I'm a dumbass.

I truly admire your energy, enthusiasm, and Passion. TAhese types of things are hard for me to respond to as they seem so negative and filled with further questions.

Firstly, we are all trying to sell something here and we all believe we have the market for the product. Why is is it so hard to sell to sponsors? I suppose we have to ask, "What's in it for them"? That is always the bottom line anyway. Without a good answer, they simply aren't intrested.

TV? Forget it. Ain'tt going to happen. Local TV coverage? Around here, forget it. Newspaper coverage? Around here, forget it, not intrested. National Billiard related periodicals? They boast a circulation of about 20-25000 per month, hardly impressive.

I feel that we deep asking what can the sponsor do for us when in reality, maybe we should be asking what we might do for the sponsor. That may very well be where the solution lies.

The last time I remember reading anything in the paper about pool was back in the 80"s. I was in Salt Lake City and in the Monday sports section was a paragraph about Bob Vanover breaking and running 9 racks in the final of the Texas Open. 20 plus years later, I'm curious how many on here even knew that happened. Just to make a point.

I'm not saying that we are doomed by any means. I'm not ready to give up either. We need knew ideas and maybe a new appproach. We have got to figure a way for sponsors to get a bang for their buck.

Dagwoodz
04-29-2008, 06:40 AM
First let me start out by saying that I truly do applaud anyone who is doing something to promote our chosen hobby/sport/obsession. Many times it's a labour of love with little return. I'm sure I'll take some flame for what I'm about to write, but here's what I see.

Unfortunately, I wasn't out in Arizona for the Desert Shoot-Out or any of the accompanying events which were held around the same time frame. From what I've been reading on here, things were extremely well run; even with a major hiccupp thrown in. (change in venues) I don't really have any specific ideas on how to promote the game to get it to reach a higher level of awareness and publicity in the States. But here are a few of my observations on what is right and wrong with what is happening with pool and billiards in America.

1. Regional Tours - Right now, these are the lifeblood of the "professional" pool player in America. Personally for me, and other players of my skill level, (sub shortstop), I love these events as they give me the opportunity to match up against a top level player for a relatively inexpensive fee, and see rooms in other towns/cities that I would not normally go to. But I think that while these tours are really the only thing keeping professional pool in America alive, they are also what is stagnating its progression to bigger and better things. More and more independant regional tours are popping up all over the place, and while this provides more opportunity for players to make a "score", and cuts down on driving distance, (and gas money spent), for the players, it hinders the game by cutting down on attendance levels, causing prize funds to decrease. The overall level of play in these events has also gone down.

An example would be up in the New England / Tri-State area. 11 years ago, the All About Pool tour was active and running. This was an A/B/C/D handicapped tour, running events in each level every month. It had two separate divisions, New England, and Tri-State. Players played in their respective regions for player of the year points in that region, in their level. (A, B, C...ect.) The "A" tournaments were the open events, and they would regularly bring in between 50-60 players, somtimes filling a 128 player bracket. The lower level events would get almost as many, with some of the C events regularly getting at least 50 players, upwards of 100 in some of the more populated areas. Eventually though, and I'm not sure about the particulars of why, this tour died out and was replaced by Mike Zuglans Joss NE 9 Ball Tour. The lower level events were picked up by some other promoters, such as the CT 9 Ball tour, and the Killer B's Tour. Mike's events started out getting great fields of 70+ players. Mike's tour is still going well up in the NE, but has had to localize primarily in the Tri-State area; only traveling up into New England only a handfull of times. The player fields are now regularly struggling to reach 40 players. Again, payouts are suffering, and room owners are getting more and more reluctant to host events that will not pull customers in to offset the cost of the added money and lost table time.

Recently Tony Robles has started up the Predator Northeast 9 Ball Tour (forgive me if it's called something else...can't remember off the top of my head the exact name). This has had a strong showing since its inception, but unfortunately I think that the attendance levels for this are going to drop just like the Joss tour's has after this initial season. From what I have seen, these two tours try to stay out of each others way. But the problem still remains that if there is an event for both events the same weekend, the player pool for both suffers, both in numbers and overall level of play. Again, this causes room owners to take a negative gain in profit, and be reluctant to host more tournaments.

There is a similar situation down where I am living right now in the south, with Mike Janis's Viking Tour, Shannon Daulton's Great Southern Billiard Tour, and Tommy Kennedy's SE Open tour. These tours are running into similar problems with player fields, and sometimes it is hard for room owners to turn a profit.

IMHO, what needs to happen first before people start thinking about national level tours, is these independantly run tours need to get together and stop trying to run over each other. If there could be ONE major tour running in each of the 7 major regions of the country, (Northeast, Mid-Atlantic, Southeast, Mid-West, Southwest, California, Northwest), it would restore the player fields to the Open events being run. More people would be inclined to come in to spectate, giving room owners more opportunity to recoup lost income. The level of play would rise. The money for the players would be a little more substantial. And because of the exposure to more people at a given time, sponsors might be a little more willing to back something like this. If these regional tours were under the umbrella of one major organization or governing body, then eventually there could be a graduation of sorts for the top players in each region to a National level tour. Again, JMHO. People like Mike Janis, Mike Zuglan, Marge and Shannon, and others running these regional events have more experience with sponsorships and room owners, and there are more than plenty of people on this board with more business experience than myself. But this is what I see.

2. 9 Ball...I think we've been programed over the past 2 decades to want to promote 9 ball as the game of choice. Now granted, 10 ball recently has garnered a huge upswing in popularity. But, as far as a casual spectator is concerned, there isn't too much of a difference. Also, the format of these tournaments is not very spectator friendly. (when I say spectator in this sense, I'm speaking of an everyday American who does not have our knowledge of the game). A format or hook is needed to be found that will engage the audiences. Poker, which took much of whatever steam pool had prior to the explosion, uses massive dollar amounts to hook the audience. Well, we've seen that in recent years, televised or broadcast ring games have become increasingly popular. I know that out in the midwest there have been ring-9 ball tournaments. I think this format could be successfull if it's incorporated with Alan Hopkins idea of a satellite type system of qualificaiton. Just like the poker model, after so many satellites, the buy-ins get so large that our players would be able to sustain themselves off of tournament winnings. Just a thought...

3. The general attitude of the player community sucks. They want to know when pool is going to take off so they can make a living off of it. Many of them, (not saying all. There are some VERY upstanding top players who go out of their way to promote the sport), want to know what they are going to get before they do anything. I can understand this mindset, they are trying to support themselves, families, and/or habits in some cases. But the whole, "I'm not doing anything until I get paid" attitude is extremely detrimental to the game. You have to give something to get something. As far as antics of some of the players...while I don't agree with what some players may do, it adds a degree of flavor to the games. This is something that a neutral spectator can enjoy due to the confrontational nature of some players. Observers need their "Face and Heel", or good guy / bad guy. A classic case of this in billiards are the old Mosconi vs. Fats matches which were televised. Mosconi was the consumate professional Face, while Fats was the self-agrandizing and highly entertaining Heel. (albeit a lovable heel).

Those are some of my observations. One poster made a great point that you need to look at what has worked and what has failed to work in the past and see what you are left with to work with and improve on. With the way things are going in the states right now with the economy, I don't even know if any of this is even viable. But as I've said numerous times, it's what I see and what I think. I hope this helps some...and I hope you're successfull in your attempt.

Dags

Blackjack
04-29-2008, 07:08 AM
Mark

I think the major problem within the "billiard world bubble" is the fact that so many people get territorial and uncooperative. For pool to have any success at all, those in positions of power need to understand that together we stand, divided - we will continue down the same gloomy road we've been on for 50 years.

Combining our efforts, our ideas, and ultimately our financial resources and directing it into a positive direction is what will bring pool into the mainstream. Right now we have too many people building their own private empires and we are getting absolutely nowhere as a result of that. We can keep blaming it on the media, lack of sponsors, gambling, etc - but to change our results we must take a long hard look at ourselves and accept the fact that WE ARE TO BLAME FOR OUR CURRENT SITUATION.

Mark, you and I have talked extensively about this and I support everything you are doing to generate interest in our game. Hopefully we can find a way to do this on a national/global scale, and you know you have my full support.

ceebee
04-29-2008, 07:10 AM
I like the local rooms idea", as long as the local room has the floor space to accomodate the people.

Charging admission is a must & the locals will just have to adjust to that idea. No one gets in free at the movies or the dance, same should go for the "Pro Pool tournament".

Invite a few "vendors", at a nominal charge to give the event a TOURNAMENT FEEL. Floor space is the constraint

Require a dress code too. Good seating is a must, that alone will make a difference to the paying public.

Just my ideas... Good Luck

jay helfert
04-29-2008, 07:33 AM
For all the above reasons, this is why "regional" tours and their events are thriving. With small added monies (typically one to five thousand), they can be sponsored by the host rooms, who can expect to recoup the costs in increased table time and food & drink sales. It is also a great promotion for the host room in terms of publicity and advertising.

My experience has been that the host room of a regional event will show increased table time revenues in the month after a tournament. More people who have watched the pro players will want to practice, often hoping to be able to play themselves in future events. It just naturally occurs this way.

When you are talking about major pro tournaments with large added monies, it is much more difficult to accomplish. This is why so many events take place in casinos traditionally. They can and do add monies on occasion. The casinos recoup money in room rentals and casino gambling, in addition to the bars and restaurants.

Outside of a casino, the best a promoter can hope for, is that a hotel will give them the ballroom free of charge in exchange for a certain number of rooms rented. The promoter is faced with the task of coming up with the added monies somewhere. And finding it in the billiard industry (especially now) is very difficult.

Other than the above, it is a few philanthropists who love pool that fund pro events, like the World Straight Pool in New York. They put in the added money with no expectation of any return. Many people don't know that the added money for the Straight Pool Challenge in DCC comes out of the pocket of Bob Jewett, to the tune of 10K every year. And he does it because he wants to keep Straight Pool alive.

The promoter of the recent Desert Shootout in Phoenix was Chuck Bobbitt, and he was personally responsible for the $25,000 in added money. No question that even with the good gate he took a healthy loss on that event. Whether he will do this again is very questionable. No businessman wants to keep losing money. I know I don't.

Danny Kuykendal
04-29-2008, 07:46 AM
The bottom line is money, like Jay said. Pool rooms won't continue to lose money no matter how much it will help pool for them to hold a tournament.
Also, a lot of work goes in to making a successful tournament. And this is usually done by the owner. Most owners are spending their valuable time running a business and trying to make a profit, and the time it takes to run a successful event takes away from this.

A good analogy I heard a few years ago, regarding management vs. ownership;
like a ham and egg sandwich, the chicken has dedicated the egg, but the pig is committed.

Danny

ironman
04-29-2008, 08:24 AM
For all the above reasons, this is why "regional" tours and their events are thriving. With small added monies (typically one to five thousand), they can be sponsored by the host rooms, who can expect to recoup the costs in increased table time and food & drink sales. It is also a great promotion for the host room in terms of publicity and advertising.

My experience has been that the host room of a regional event will show increased table time revenues in the month after a tournament. More people who have watched the pro players will want to practice, often hoping to be able to play themselves in future events. It just naturally occurs this way.

When you are talking about major pro tournaments with large added monies, it is much more difficult to accomplish. This is why so many events take place in casinos traditionally. They can and do add monies on occasion. The casinos recoup money in room rentals and casino gambling, in addition to the bars and restaurants.

Outside of a casino, the best a promoter can hope for, is that a hotel will give them the ballroom free of charge in exchange for a certain number of rooms rented. The promoter is faced with the task of coming up with the added monies somewhere. And finding it in the billiard industry (especially now) is very difficult.

Other than the above, it is a few philanthropists who love pool that fund pro events, like the World Straight Pool in New York. They put in the added money with no expectation of any return. Many people don't know that the added money for the Straight Pool Challenge in DCC comes out of the pocket of Bob Jewett, to the tune of 10K every year. And he does it because he wants to keep Straight Pool alive.

The promoter of the recent Desert Shootout in Phoenix was Chuck Bobbitt, and he was personally responsible for the $25,000 in added money. No question that even with the good gate he took a healthy loss on that event. Whether he will do this again is very questionable. No businessman wants to keep losing money. I know I don't.

There are regional tours where the room doesn't add one dime and still claims no significant increase in revenues.

Trust me on this one.

jay helfert
04-29-2008, 08:45 AM
There are regional tours where the room doesn't add one dime and still claims no significant increase in revenues.

Trust me on this one.


"Claims" is the operative word here. I DO trust YOU!

bfdlad
04-29-2008, 08:56 AM
I'm not talking about starting a new regional tour or to even compete with the UPA. I'm thinking about events like the World Summit Of Pool that has been held in Vegas etc. Put those events that at this point are not going to take place at the Riviera and put them in pool rooms. I know it is not flashy and not the best condition but at least it will take place.

bfdlad
04-29-2008, 08:58 AM
"Claims" is the operative word here. I DO trust YOU!
Jay, I have a vision of you that keeps flashing in my mind when I think of you. It is still making me laugh, I think you may know what I am thinking.

jay helfert
04-29-2008, 09:02 AM
Jay, I have a vision of you that keeps flashing in my mind when I think of you. It is still making me laugh, I think you may know what I am thinking.

HMMMMMM, I just hope it isn't X rated. :)

bfdlad
04-29-2008, 09:05 AM
HMMMMMM, I just hope it isn't X rated. :)
A little I guess. I actually began to close the curtains so nobody would see what you were doing. :)

ironman
04-29-2008, 09:21 AM
"Claims" is the operative word here. I DO trust YOU!

We are on the same page here. I have just quit arguing about it with the powers to be.

ironman
04-29-2008, 09:23 AM
A little I guess. I actually began to close the curtains so nobody would see what you were doing. :)

Hope it has nothing to do with his favorite NY Ball Club??

bfdlad
04-29-2008, 09:27 AM
Hope it has nothing to do with his favorite NY Ball Club??
No this time, I think he knows what I am talking about it was just a funny thing that may not be that funny except to me.

ironman
04-29-2008, 12:38 PM
No this time, I think he knows what I am talking about it was just a funny thing that may not be that funny except to me.

It was the most twisted guess I could come up with.

BigCat
04-30-2008, 12:53 AM
I'm not talking about starting a new regional tour or to even compete with the UPA. I'm thinking about events like the World Summit Of Pool that has been held in Vegas etc. Put those events that at this point are not going to take place at the Riviera and put them in pool rooms. I know it is not flashy and not the best condition but at least it will take place.

Hey Mark,

This issue is a very big can of worms and, as I'm sure you know, has been discussed ad nauseam. But I do have some input from a player perspective. BTW, next time you see me, please introduce yourself.

There have been a couple of posts already by Jay Helfert and ironman that really address some of the main concerns with promoting the type of event you are talking about. If we are talking about a singular "pro" type or regional event, the promoter of this type of event will probably take a hit financially in the beginning while many of the kinks are worked out. But much of the success of this type of event can hinge on the advertisement of the event prior to the event itself. I can't tell you how many times that I've heard about a tournament after it happened and told myself - "if I only knew about it, I would have played in it".

Where this is most important is advertising to poolrooms in neighbooring states/regions. There is a tremendous potential to bring in more players (and indirectly more attention from potential sponsors and promoters) if events are "broadcast" more widely to larger regions. An example that comes to mind is a tournamnet that is held every Labor Day weekend at Shooters in Riverside, Ca. Until about 2 years ago, I never knew this tourmament existed. I only found out about it through local players that had gone to it in prior years. Now for those that live in California, most players probably already know about this tournament, but for players in adjacent states/regions it's difficult to know of these types of tournaments. And this particular Labor Day weekend tournament is a very good caliber tournament.

Of course, advertisement is just one aspect. But I believe it is an important one. If you want the type of event you are talking about (something like the World Summit of Pool) to be successful, then word of mouth and internet forums will probably not be sufficient.

Now finding a reputable host pool room to accomadate such an event is also a difficult task itself. But I think it can be done. As Jay mentioned, the pool room has many avenues to recover costs through door entry, food and beverage sales, and of course the exposure that this type of event will generate for the room (resulting in higher business in the following weeks). I don't believe that this will be the biggest challenge.

I believe the biggest challenge will be bankrolling the added monies. And since I'm not a promoter, I can't speak to this issue very well. But there are many others here on AZB as well as in the pool world that I'm sure you could talk with to find a workable formula for a successful event.

In terms of playing conditions, it won't take much to get players to come to the event other than a good sum of money added (1K, 2K, 3K, or more) and reasonably decent playing conditions. Obviously, the higher amount added, the more likely you will attract a more elite field. I like the idea of having a consistent set of pool balls and rack for every table just for that tournament. It's also nice when the players and spectator afreas are sectioned off. It can add a sense of a "pro" type atmosphere or even just a high caliber event that people will want to be a part of, either as spectators or players. And, it would be nice if the playing tables would be all in relatively good shape (i.e. decent cloth, good rails, does not roll off, etc...).

That's about all I can think of for now, but if I think anything else, I'll post it. Good luck.

Ray