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gpeezy
04-29-2008, 01:26 PM
Tough RollsBy Keith McCready, InsidePOOL ColumnistThe pool industry has weathered some tough rolls over the years. It has accomplished many successes, in many
respects, upon entering the international arena as well as acquiring lucrative sponsors, and these endeavors are made
possible by the personal contributions of hard-working folks who have a vision and want to take pool to a higher level. I
have always wondered, though, how the two-shot/push-out rule from the early '70s changed to the o-ne-foul/ball-in-hand
rule used in today's competitions. My guess at that time, it was because the people from the East Coast couldn't beat the
people from the West Coast, so they had to change the rule.For those who may not know what the two-shot/push-out rule is, it goes like this. At any time during the game, you can
push the cue ball to anywhere o-n the table that you think you are able to make the shot and your opponent cannot. Your
opponent then decides whether or not he wants to shoot this shot. Whoever takes the shot must make a legal hit o-n the
object ball without scratching. A legal hit means you must hit the object ball with enough speed to allow the object ball to
hit the rail or, if the cue ball hits the rail first and then makes contact with the object ball, the object ball must hit the rail. If
no legal hit is executed, then the other player gets ball in hand.
Let me tell you a cute story. There was a high-paying tournament in Memphis, Tennessee, and all of the best
"gunfighters" and stake-horses were in attendance. I was about 21 years old, a little green in some ways, but I was
virtually unknown in these parts. By the end of the tournament, I already had my target, a local fellow by the name of St.
Louis Louie Roberts. Needless to say, he was o-ne of the top players in the world at that time.
After some barking back and forth, the railbirds settled o-n their perches, and it didn't take long for the game to begin. We
decided to play a 7-ahead set, meaning o-ne player had to win seven games ahead of the other. Now, Louie was rated
as o-ne of the toughest 9-ball players in the world and I was real young and o-n the road, but I had no fear as I raced to
the table to flip the coin.
Louie could cut a ball o-n a dime, but what he didn't know was that I was practicing the cut shots myself. So he could not
roll out for these really hard cut shots, and if he did, I would either make the shot or leave him safe, instead of letting him
shoot, which left him benched more times than not. At the conclusion of each set, Louie would politely excuse himself
from the table for a few minutes and played it off as if he was going to wash his hands, and after a period of time, I
started breaking him down o-n the strength of the two-shot/push-out rule. We ended up playing four sets of the 7-ahead
game, and I won all four.
The McCready-and-Roberts show came to an end, and I couldn't wait to break down my cue stick and leave, but then
four guys rushed the table and surrounded Louie. It was then that I realized that he was not washing his hands at the end
of each set. When he would dismiss himself from the table, he was actually looking for a guy to lend him money to play
another set by offering his cue stick as collateral, but after each set, he would borrow from another guy, then another
guy, and then another guy. When it was all over, Louie owed four guys the same cue stick, and each o-ne of them was
now looking to Louie for their immediate payment -- the stick. Well, Louie o-nly had the o-ne cue stick, and I knew he was
in trouble. So, before things got out of hand, I quickly pulled Louie off to the side and gave him some money back, so he
could smooth it out with his lenders.
In the days of two-shot/push-out, it was harder to beat a good player like St. Louis Louie Roberts. The best player would
be forced to out-shoot their opponent in order to win. There would be more offense with your defense. Now there is a lot
more luck involved in the game of pool, which I can't stand. If the rules used back in the '70s were in force, I think my
game could maybe shine all over again. The victory could, and would, not be won with lucky rolls, and it would force
players use their pool-playing skills and God-given talent. The game would not rely o-n the luck factor as much, and we
could transform the tournament trail back to where I think it should be: Two-shot/push-out, and let the best player win.

ironman
04-29-2008, 02:03 PM
Tough RollsBy Keith McCready, InsidePOOL ColumnistThe pool industry has weathered some tough rolls over the years. It has accomplished many successes, in many
respects, upon entering the international arena as well as acquiring lucrative sponsors, and these endeavors are made
possible by the personal contributions of hard-working folks who have a vision and want to take pool to a higher level. I
have always wondered, though, how the two-shot/push-out rule from the early '70s changed to the o-ne-foul/ball-in-hand
rule used in today's competitions. My guess at that time, it was because the people from the East Coast couldn't beat the
people from the West Coast, so they had to change the rule.For those who may not know what the two-shot/push-out rule is, it goes like this. At any time during the game, you can
push the cue ball to anywhere o-n the table that you think you are able to make the shot and your opponent cannot. Your
opponent then decides whether or not he wants to shoot this shot. Whoever takes the shot must make a legal hit o-n the
object ball without scratching. A legal hit means you must hit the object ball with enough speed to allow the object ball to
hit the rail or, if the cue ball hits the rail first and then makes contact with the object ball, the object ball must hit the rail. If
no legal hit is executed, then the other player gets ball in hand.
Let me tell you a cute story. There was a high-paying tournament in Memphis, Tennessee, and all of the best
"gunfighters" and stake-horses were in attendance. I was about 21 years old, a little green in some ways, but I was
virtually unknown in these parts. By the end of the tournament, I already had my target, a local fellow by the name of St.
Louis Louie Roberts. Needless to say, he was o-ne of the top players in the world at that time.
After some barking back and forth, the railbirds settled o-n their perches, and it didn't take long for the game to begin. We
decided to play a 7-ahead set, meaning o-ne player had to win seven games ahead of the other. Now, Louie was rated
as o-ne of the toughest 9-ball players in the world and I was real young and o-n the road, but I had no fear as I raced to
the table to flip the coin.
Louie could cut a ball o-n a dime, but what he didn't know was that I was practicing the cut shots myself. So he could not
roll out for these really hard cut shots, and if he did, I would either make the shot or leave him safe, instead of letting him
shoot, which left him benched more times than not. At the conclusion of each set, Louie would politely excuse himself
from the table for a few minutes and played it off as if he was going to wash his hands, and after a period of time, I
started breaking him down o-n the strength of the two-shot/push-out rule. We ended up playing four sets of the 7-ahead
game, and I won all four.
The McCready-and-Roberts show came to an end, and I couldn't wait to break down my cue stick and leave, but then
four guys rushed the table and surrounded Louie. It was then that I realized that he was not washing his hands at the end
of each set. When he would dismiss himself from the table, he was actually looking for a guy to lend him money to play
another set by offering his cue stick as collateral, but after each set, he would borrow from another guy, then another
guy, and then another guy. When it was all over, Louie owed four guys the same cue stick, and each o-ne of them was
now looking to Louie for their immediate payment -- the stick. Well, Louie o-nly had the o-ne cue stick, and I knew he was
in trouble. So, before things got out of hand, I quickly pulled Louie off to the side and gave him some money back, so he
could smooth it out with his lenders.
In the days of two-shot/push-out, it was harder to beat a good player like St. Louis Louie Roberts. The best player would
be forced to out-shoot their opponent in order to win. There would be more offense with your defense. Now there is a lot
more luck involved in the game of pool, which I can't stand. If the rules used back in the '70s were in force, I think my
game could maybe shine all over again. The victory could, and would, not be won with lucky rolls, and it would force
players use their pool-playing skills and God-given talent. The game would not rely o-n the luck factor as much, and we
could transform the tournament trail back to where I think it should be: Two-shot/push-out, and let the best player win.

That is funny. Louie used every trick in the book and invented a few of his own. The best "BITE ARTIST" who ever lived.

Louie came walking into the Reds tournament years ago looking like a picture of health and sporting two stake horses who looked like west Texas cattle buyers.

Louie made his grand entrance and someone asked Louie how he was doing and he replied, "just great. Just outta rehab and ready to take on the world."

Someone then looked at Louie's cue and complimented it.

Louie replies, " yep ain't this a beauty?"

Sweater asks," How much did that run ya

Louie looks around at the two fancy Stake Horses and replies, " Oh about $6500 so far"!

There was about a 6 month period when Louie was listening to those tapes about Nebraska falling off in the Pacific, that nobody could touch the guy. He played near perfectly.

JAM
04-29-2008, 03:08 PM
Thanks for sharing the article. I enjoyed reading it. :)

You know, it sounds vaguely familiar! :D

JAM

8ballEinstein
04-29-2008, 07:05 PM
I have always wondered, though, how the two-shot/push-out rule from the early '70s changed to the o-ne-foul/ball-in-hand rule used in today's competitions. My guess at that time, it was because the people from the East Coast couldn't beat the
people from the West Coast, so they had to change the rule.

The first time I heard of one-foul/BIH, it was during the Richie Florence tournaments held at the Tropicana in Las Vegas. In fact, I remember poeple use to call it "Vegas Rules" for awhile. This was in 1980. Later on, many pool tournament venues started using the rule but for several years, it was comman to see the shoot-out rule in place during head-to-head matchups.

After televised pool became popular, it seemed like everyone started playing one foul-BIH. By about 1987, you rarely saw a two-shot shoot-out game. In just a few years the game was transformed. The best players before the rule change were still the best players afterward. I don't know of any top player that couldn't make the crossover.

Of course new shots started to be developed. The kick-safe was nearly unheard of prior to Efren Reyes. The full-ball jump was also something new. Interesting how the game evolved!

ironman
04-30-2008, 03:13 AM
The first time I heard of one-foul/BIH, it was during the Richie Florence tournaments held at the Tropicana in Las Vegas. In fact, I remember poeple use to call it "Vegas Rules" for awhile. This was in 1980. Later on, many pool tournament venues started using the rule but for several years, it was comman to see the shoot-out rule in place during head-to-head matchups.

After televised pool became popular, it seemed like everyone started playing one foul-BIH. By about 1987, you rarely saw a two-shot shoot-out game. In just a few years the game was transformed. The best players before the rule change were still the best players afterward. I don't know of any top player that couldn't make the crossover.

Of course new shots started to be developed. The kick-safe was nearly unheard of prior to Efren Reyes. The full-ball jump was also something new. Interesting how the game evolved!

I believe the kick safe was made most popular by Captain Hook.