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ForumGhost516
04-30-2008, 11:54 AM
Hey everyone me again I wanted to ask all of u if u felt if pool lessons really helped. From what I was always able to gather it was more of a practice game meaning the more you practice and play the more you will get better. Over the ears I have learned that is not the case as you are always learning in this game. I am in ny and am debating starting lessons with tony robles has anyone had experience with him? I have met him before and watched him play and he is definitely someone I would love to model my game after. Any insights would be appreciated.

td873
04-30-2008, 11:57 AM
Hey everyone me again I wanted to ask all of u if u felt if pool lessons really helped. From what I was always able to gather it was more of a practice game meaning the more you practice and play the more you will get better. Over the ears I have learned that is not the case as you are always learning in this game. I am in ny and am debating starting lessons with tony robles has anyone had experience with him? I have met him before and watched him play and he is definitely someone I would love to model my game after. Any insights would be appreciated.
As with anything in life, education is (almost) always worth the money spent. Pool lessons are just another form of education, i.e., learning something from those with knowledge. You can only learn so much on your own...

-td

bfdlad
04-30-2008, 11:59 AM
Hey everyone me again I wanted to ask all of u if u felt if pool lessons really helped. From what I was always able to gather it was more of a practice game meaning the more you practice and play the more you will get better. Over the ears I have learned that is not the case as you are always learning in this game. I am in ny and am debating starting lessons with tony robles has anyone had experience with him? I have met him before and watched him play and he is definitely someone I would love to model my game after. Any insights would be appreciated.
Tony is one of the best instructors out there. I have heard nothing but good things about him and what he does.

ugotactionTX
04-30-2008, 12:05 PM
Not knowing your speed it's hard to say for sure.
the thing about lessons IMO... is you have to be willing to unlearn and relearn. Most of the time lessons can improve a players game relative to their speed. For instance, for a D player lessons from a pro may not be practical unless they already have SOLID fundamentals (would they still be a D player?) because no amount of knowledge can save a bad stroke but it can greatly effect clumsy thinking. If you can already run out (sometimes) lessons from a pro could go a long way to help you over your hurdles. But if you can't make 3 balls in a row or have NO idea where the cueball is going, it might be better to enlist the help of a solid local player to help you, until you have the skillset to really take advantage of a top pro's lessons. Sure, he could help you with the most basic fundamentals but not very good use of time and money IMO.

cleary
04-30-2008, 12:09 PM
I am in ny and am debating starting lessons with tony robles has anyone had experience with him? I have met him before and watched him play and he is definitely someone I would love to model my game after. Any insights would be appreciated.

There should be no debate. Tony is an amazing instructor and he will help your game no matter where you need the help. Ive worked with him several times and every time I walk away with something great.

I just lad a hour lesson with Chris Lynch at Amsterdam Billiards (who is not only a great player and instructor, a very nice guy) the other night and I honestly could not believe how much knowledge I got from that. By far the best lesson Ive had and also the cheapest.

Ive also worked with Kid Delicious who is also a very good teacher and a very nice guy.

So yes, I think lessons help A LOT... and being in NY, you have a lot of options. Tony, Chris, Danny, Ron V, Ginky... the list goes on.

cleary
04-30-2008, 12:17 PM
For instance, for a D player lessons from a pro may not be practical unless they already have SOLID fundamentals (would they still be a D player?) because no amount of knowledge can save a bad stroke but it can greatly effect clumsy thinking. If you can already run out (sometimes) lessons from a pro could go a long way to help you over your hurdles. But if you can't make 3 balls in a row or have NO idea where the cueball is going, it might be better to enlist the help of a solid local player to help you, until you have the skillset to really take advantage of a top pro's lessons.

I have to disagree. Teaching is something that a lot of people cannot do. If your a D player and need help with controling the cue ball, a good teacher can apply the knowledge. The teacher will also know where the problem lies. A lot of non teaching players that try to help, wont find the real problem (i.e. stance, stroke, bridge) that a proper teacher would.

catscradle
04-30-2008, 12:21 PM
Hey everyone me again I wanted to ask all of u if u felt if pool lessons really helped. From what I was always able to gather it was more of a practice game meaning the more you practice and play the more you will get better. Over the ears I have learned that is not the case as you are always learning in this game. I am in ny and am debating starting lessons with tony robles has anyone had experience with him? I have met him before and watched him play and he is definitely someone I would love to model my game after. Any insights would be appreciated.

Depends on who is giving the lesson. I've had lessons that have help enoumously, lessons that were so-so, and lessons which may have been detrimental.
I've never had a lesson from Robles, but have heard nothing but good about his lessons.

CocoboloCowboy
04-30-2008, 12:24 PM
Any insights would be appreciated.

Profession instruction will help you game, if you practice what you are taught. Want a good basic instructions DVD for under twenty bucks?

Jerry Biesath's DVD How to play pool right. Available from www.poolndarts.com

Master 90% of what Jerry teaches, and you will be an awesome player IMHO.http://www.geocities.com/cocobolocowboy/popcorn1.gif

Pushout
04-30-2008, 12:28 PM
You could probably benefit from lessons if you've never had one before. That said, it all depends on how your basics are now and what your weak points are. How good you play now is a good indication of how much lessons could benefit you. You may need a pro caliber player to take a good look at your game and make some recommendations.
Personally, I'm a bit leery of getting lessons from just anybody. I've had formal lessons from three former World Champions and one road player. The only thing any of them had me change as far as basics was that one of the Champions had me change my grip on the butt. The lesson that has stayed with me the longest was the one from the road player and it became the basis of my current 9 ball game. If you don't mind spending the money at this time, it would probably be money well spent, but bear in mind that it may not be cheap. I don't know what Tony and the guys around the City get for formal lessons. I know that some people who teach pool for a living are not cheap and whether some of them are worth the money is debatable. These days, you'll get all kind of recommends for different instructors. If you want to travel a bit, I'd suggest Joe Tucker, Jerry Briesath, Mark Wilson, or Stan Shuffett. I suggest these folks because I've heard good things about them not just on AZ but out in the pool world as well. But, that's just my opinion.

BVal
04-30-2008, 12:32 PM
Yes they do really help.

BVal

gpeezy
04-30-2008, 12:33 PM
All caliber of players could and do use lessons from other players. There is always room for improvement in anyone's game. Take that to heart.

Blackjack
04-30-2008, 12:44 PM
Find a teacher that is just as motivated to teach as you are to learn - and Tony is definitely one of those teachers.

No amount of instruction from anybody will help if you do not have the proper attitude. I tell all of my students that an open mind is a black hole for knowledge. A closed mind is a brick wall for knowledge.

Over the years I have worked with plenty of open minded players, and I have had my share of closed minded players. One is a lot of fun and the other is a waste of our time.

My advice is to go out to lunch with Tony PRIOR to the lesson and talk about what you expect to get out of a lesson - what your goals are and how he can help you to get there. Tony is a good guy and very easy to talk to - he has a great attitude toward teaching and instruction, and he is also one of the best players in the world (including being the reigning NJ Straight Pool Champion).

IMO, taking lessons from Tony Robles is a win-win for any player at any level. Just remember that in the world of billiards instruction, the teacher can't do all the work for you. As an instructor, I provide information and it is up to the student to take what is learned and practice it until it is mastered. Good luck!

Jude Rosenstock
04-30-2008, 12:46 PM
I think Tony is great but honestly, it's more about the student than the instructor. You have to practice what he teaches. Seriously, if I taught lessons and had to go over the same thing twice with a student, I'd probably tell him he's wasting my time and I'd end the lesson right there. Tony is a far more patient person that I am (also a far better player). With that said, onus is on you.

av84fun
04-30-2008, 12:50 PM
Of course, the instructor is the key to whether a lesson for a given player will be productive, but with Tony Robles, the risk of not learning enough to justify the MODEST fee he chages is exactly ZERO.

Tony is a SUPER teacher. He adapts immediately to the student's flaws and doesn't take the "do it this way because I say so" approach.

In addition, he's one of the world's nicest guys. Don't even think about it...just do it.

Having said that, you need to understand how to be a student. Tony is so good that if you don't adopt everything he recommends re: your basic mechanics then you would be a poor student....as are MANY people who take lessons.

You have to be prepared to go BACKWARD in your game for a while before the modifications you are given become imbedded in your subconscious...which can take weeks if not MONTHS to do. MANY students become disillusioned after only brief efforts to adopt the instructors advice and return to their "default" habits.

Finally, at the end of the session...take a least a half day to start...you will be given FAR too much information to absorb. So TAKE NOTES or better yet, have someone video the session.

Then at the end, ask Tony the following question..."If I could ONLY work on TWO things you have told me...what would you suggest they should be.

Then STOP RUNNING RACKS for at least 2 weeks and do NOTHING but work on drills that will encorporate the advice you get.

Regards,
Jim

Celtic
04-30-2008, 12:55 PM
Generally speaking lessons can be great for a beginner with little knowledge of how spin causes the balls to react, a poor stroke with a bad bridge, lack of understanding on the aiming point to make a shot, ect...

Once a person has the basics down reasonably well lessons do little to help and a person will get better via simply shooting balls, lots and lots of balls. Once you have the basics the way to get good is simply to play as much pool as you possibly can to make the muscle memory of the stroke more natural and make the aiming of all shots more automatic. Shooting shots with every type of spin, top, bottom, left, right, mixes of both, inside juice with tops, inside juice with bottoms, ect... basically you want to shoot a ludicrous amount of pool and make all of that stuff start to feel second nature to where getting down and stroking almost any shot into the heart with almost any siding and speed becomes easy. This does not come from lessons, it comes from shooting a huge amount of pool.

av84fun
04-30-2008, 12:57 PM
I think Tony is great but honestly, it's more about the student than the instructor. You have to practice what he teaches. Seriously, if I taught lessons and had to go over the same thing twice with a student, I'd probably tell him he's wasting my time and I'd end the lesson right there. Tony is a far more patient person that I am (also a far better player). With that said, onus is on you.

I didn't see yours until I posted mine. Your theme is EXACTLY correct. But the patience part is really important for teachers in all walks of life.

The best ones clearly understand that their students will experience some level of "sensory overload" and simply CANNOT take immediate ownership of what they are told.

We all process information differently and the best teachers will have several different ways to verbalize and demonstrate what they are trying to convey.

Regards,
Jim

av84fun
04-30-2008, 01:12 PM
Generally speaking lessons can be great for a beginner with little knowledge of how spin causes the balls to react, a poor stroke with a bad bridge, lack of understanding on the aiming point to make a shot, ect...

Once a person has the basics down reasonably well lessons do little to help and a person will get better via simply shooting balls, lots and lots of balls. Once you have the basics the way to get good is simply to play as much pool as you possibly can to make the muscle memory of the stroke more natural and make the aiming of all shots more automatic. Shooting shots with every type of spin, top, bottom, left, right, mixes of both, inside juice with tops, inside juice with bottoms, ect... basically you want to shoot a ludicrous amount of pool and make all of that stuff start to feel second nature to where getting down and stroking almost any shot into the heart with almost any siding and speed becomes easy. This does not come from lessons, it comes from shooting a huge amount of pool.

Respectfully, I almost totally disagree. You are right that shooting tons and tons of shots is critical to improvement BUT...BUT...many players merely "groove their flaws" by shooting with mediocre mechanics, cueing skills and table generalship.


There is virtually NO level of skill at which competent teaching/coaching would prove pointless. The proof of that statement is none other than Tiger Woods who had several majors to his credit at which point he changed instructors and totally rebuilt his swing.

Regards,
Jim

Jude Rosenstock
04-30-2008, 01:15 PM
I didn't see yours until I posted mine. Your theme is EXACTLY correct. But the patience part is really important for teachers in all walks of life.

The best ones clearly understand that their students will experience some level of "sensory overload" and simply CANNOT take immediate ownership of what they are told.

We all process information differently and the best teachers will have several different ways to verbalize and demonstrate what they are trying to convey.

Regards,
Jim


Oh, that's to be expected. I'm speaking only about students that don't practice. Tony gives great lessons but it's important to take those lessons and process the information until it's fully processed. If you roadblock, then you talk to Tony about it again but you should never go back to him with "Yeah, I didn't really spend any time practicing what you showed me. Can you go over it with me again?"

poolplayer2093
04-30-2008, 01:28 PM
i think lessons result in you practicing more because you have new things to practice and focusing more while you're at the table. once in a while there'll be something really important you'll pick u. either way i'd so yeah it's worth it

av84fun
04-30-2008, 01:32 PM
Oh, that's to be expected. I'm speaking only about students that don't practice. Tony gives great lessons but it's important to take those lessons and process the information until it's fully processed. If you roadblock, then you talk to Tony about it again but you should never go back to him with "Yeah, I didn't really spend any time practicing what you showed me. Can you go over it with me again?"

Gotcha Jude...no argument here. I'm just saying that the teacher must keep in mind the VOLUME of information conveyed and the time interval between lessons.

If a student is taking an hour or two a week it could well be that he didn't have enough time to AND SHOULD NOT HAVE practiced everything taught.

Say the student is holding the forearm at > 90 degress to the cue....is short stroking....and has an inconsistent finish/follow thru.

While the instructor may see a dozen other things the student needs to learn, I think the best of them would realize that

A) until until the stroke is fixed there is no point in...and would be counter-productive to drill on other issues and

B) Would give the student instruction and drills to work on to fix the stroke and advise the student to do NOTHING ELSE until he owns the improved stroke.

I qualify the above to the extent that traveling instructors or those who hold "pool schools" HAVE to give a broad array of instruction within the limited time they have available.

That's why I think that those with access to local top knotch instructors are REALLY lucky because I am certain that 8 hours of instruction over 8 weeks is a FAR better structure than 8 hours given over a day or two.

I TOTALLY agree with you that patience might not even be a good idea in the case where the student is obviously not practicing what he/she was TOLD to practice in a given time frame.

Regards,
Jim

Pushout
04-30-2008, 01:42 PM
A) until until the stroke is fixed there is no point in...and would be counter-productive to drill on other issues and

B) Would give the student instruction and drills to work on to fix the stroke and advise the student to do NOTHING ELSE until he owns the improved stroke.

Regards,
Jim

Right on, if the student can't accomplish the fix on the stroke, any other stuff will just get in the way. If I've heard it once, I've heard it a hundred times, "It's all in the stroke". It really is the basis for everything else.

Jude Rosenstock
04-30-2008, 02:04 PM
I TOTALLY agree with you that patience might not even be a good idea in the case where the student is obviously not practicing what he/she was TOLD to practice in a given time frame.

Regards,
Jim


Well, the fundamental difference between myself and Tony is that I'm not a professional instructor. He is. He does it for a living and he's very good at it. Me? if I teach, it's because at that moment, I want to teach. If I think you're wasting my time, that's it. No more.

Celtic
04-30-2008, 02:05 PM
Respectfully, I almost totally disagree. You are right that shooting tons and tons of shots is critical to improvement BUT...BUT...many players merely "groove their flaws" by shooting with mediocre mechanics, cueing skills and table generalship.

Nevertheless almost all of the top pool players in the world today did not get to the top due to formal lessons. They got there through playing huge amounts of pool and a large amount of natural skill. They learned things via watching what the others players are doing. They learned how to shoot various shot in the non-formal communication amoungst peers while in the pool hall. Alot of the top players in the world show what would be construed as "flaws" in their stroke and yet they rose to the top of the game, Keith would be a prime example. If you look at Strickland compared to Archer compared to Sigel compared to Hall compared to .... you realize there is no certain prime way to stroke the cue that means success. Would McCready been a better player with a more traditional stroke then he was? It would be hard to imagine since he was at the top and beating other top pro's with supposed more "traditional" strokes.

The proof is in the pudding as they say. The large majoritty (and I mean huge) of top players in the world got there without formal lessons. They got there with matching up and playing alot of pool and picking up bits from here and there through their lives. If I want to learn something about a specific part of the game I am going to get it through simply watching other players and testing various stuff to see what works for me. That is the way almost all the good players in this world got to where they are.

kaznj
04-30-2008, 02:21 PM
Maybe my point of view is slanted because I have been a public school teacher for 30 years. I firmly believe that if a person is willing to practice what he learns he will benefit greatly. Tony comes with a great rep.You are not likely to go wrong with him. I went to pool school last summer with Randyg and Scott lee. I went from a 4 in the apa to a 6 within a couple of months. I firmly believe that they helped fix some flaws in my stroke that made the difference. I feel you need someone who will not only teach you what you want to learn but also point out some problems he sees.
I think it is difficult to gauge an amature, even a serious one, with the accomplishments of a pro. My observations are that anyone to reaches the pinnicle of any professional sport is a unique person. No matter how much a 270 hitter practices he is not likely to turn into a 310 hitter. Very few people will ever , no matter how much he practices, ever run 100 balls, or pocket balls like an Earl Strickland. People like that are just blessed with amazing talent.
My advice, take some lessons. Not just one, but several. You will be suprised what you don't know. Then practice what they teach you. Good luck.

ugotactionTX
04-30-2008, 02:23 PM
I have to disagree. Teaching is something that a lot of people cannot do. If your a D player and need help with controling the cue ball, a good teacher can apply the knowledge. The teacher will also know where the problem lies. A lot of non teaching players that try to help, wont find the real problem (i.e. stance, stroke, bridge) that a proper teacher would.


But by "solid local player" I was talking about someone that COULD teach the proper way to do things, not just any 'ol player that can make a few balls. I completely agree, many top players cannot articulate what they are doing in a way that students can grasp. Then of course you have the side, people that really don't play that good, but can teach very well. IMO:)

Eric Wynne
04-30-2008, 03:09 PM
Tony would be an excellant choice , great player and exceptional human being... Hard work and the level of competition is the secret to pool... If you play with girls all the time you play like a girl ... Play with champions ...well you get the picture ... Most people don't want to sacrifice what it takes to become great players ... Remember this , it's the spankings that make your ass tough ... Notice how people who didn't get spankings turn out to be ... Well you can form your own opinion but lessons only benefit those who work hard and are dedicated, ... the whole game is you and the white ball , a pro can tell you but you have to do it ... Anything worthwhile you have to suffer for ...

ForumGhost516
04-30-2008, 03:49 PM
I spoke to tony today and let me tell you he is probably one of the nicest people i have spoken to pool or otherwise in quite some time. i will be starting up in june after the predator pool school and another event he will be at and i am looking forward to it. As for the patience aspect i am more than understanding of the fact that you have to be willing to relearn the basics and in truth i look forward to my many flaws being corrected. i have no problem taking his advice. people who expect to be pros after three lessons simply dont get it, that is why in my opinion most diets fail after the first week people didnt lose liek fifty pounds so they stop. I think i will keep a diary of the sessions and post my progress here on the forum give people an idea of how things are progerssing. To all who have replied i thank you for your knowledge and insight.

av84fun
04-30-2008, 03:54 PM
Well, the fundamental difference between myself and Tony is that I'm not a professional instructor. He is. He does it for a living and he's very good at it. Me? if I teach, it's because at that moment, I want to teach. If I think you're wasting my time, that's it. No more.

Gotcha. I'd probably be the same way.

Regards,
Jim

Roadkill
04-30-2008, 03:58 PM
Hey everyone me again I wanted to ask all of u if u felt if pool lessons really helped. From what I was always able to gather it was more of a practice game meaning the more you practice and play the more you will get better. Over the ears I have learned that is not the case as you are always learning in this game. I am in ny and am debating starting lessons with tony robles has anyone had experience with him? I have met him before and watched him play and he is definitely someone I would love to model my game after. Any insights would be appreciated.

Lessons can be helpful, but it's extremely important not to feel like you're "on the clock". Tony can certainly improve your game, but see if he's willing to work with you "by the session" or "by the day", and "NOT" by the hour.

av84fun
04-30-2008, 04:21 PM
Nevertheless almost all of the top pool players in the world today did not get to the top due to formal lessons. They got there through playing huge amounts of pool and a large amount of natural skill. They learned things via watching what the others players are doing. They learned how to shoot various shot in the non-formal communication amoungst peers while in the pool hall. Alot of the top players in the world show what would be construed as "flaws" in their stroke and yet they rose to the top of the game, Keith would be a prime example. If you look at Strickland compared to Archer compared to Sigel compared to Hall compared to .... you realize there is no certain prime way to stroke the cue that means success. Would McCready been a better player with a more traditional stroke then he was? It would be hard to imagine since he was at the top and beating other top pro's with supposed more "traditional" strokes.

The proof is in the pudding as they say. The large majoritty (and I mean huge) of top players in the world got there without formal lessons. They got there with matching up and playing alot of pool and picking up bits from here and there through their lives. If I want to learn something about a specific part of the game I am going to get it through simply watching other players and testing various stuff to see what works for me. That is the way almost all the good players in this world got to where they are.

I hear what you are saying but there are a couple of points you are missing IMHO.

You wrote "formal lessons" but in real life, there is not much of a distinction between a "lesson" acquired by playing some casual matches or small sets with Tony Robles and taking a "formal lesson" with him.

The huge majority of the huge majority of top pros you referred to were fortunate enough to in many cases, literally grow up in rooms where championship pool was being played.

Many refer to the fact that Mosconi "never had a formal lesson" but that is a half truth that amounts to a falsehood. All Willie did was to travel for YEARS and play THOUSANDS of exhibition matches with none other than Ralf Greenleaf, who many think was the best player who ever lived.

So, LESSONS where given to Willie at the highest possible level, just by watching. I also refuse to believe that in the tens of thousands of road miles they put on together that Ralf was so closed mouthed that he never gave Willie a single tip. Even if Willie said that, I would not believe it.

As for the non-standard mechanics used by some pros, I couldn't agree with you more that no teacher in his right mind would watch Keith on a good day and say a WORD about his sidearm stroke. Just as no one would say anything to Trevino or Furyk.

But the fact of the matter is that the huge majority of aspiring pool players have virtually ZERO access to playing with top touring pros and so taking lessons with great teachers is not only their best option...it is their ONLY option.

Furthermore, unless you have studied the careers of today's top pros much more thoroughly than I have, it is hard to accept that you would have actual case histories regarding the frequency and type of "lessons" that they might have had.

I would hazard a guess...and it is not much more than that, that the majority of top pros have close friends who are their peers and who practice together and share knowledge almost constantly.

Every one of them that I know...and there are quite a few...do exactly what I stated above.

Finally, I asked Stan Shuffet on this very forum a while back what he things Landon's speed might be if he didn't have a BCA instructor (or the equivalent) as a father. Stan responded that his speed would be near zero.

That may have been an overstatement to make a point or it could have meant that Stan doubts that Landon would have dedicated himself so totally without constant parental guidance but the point is the point nevertheless and was meant to suggest that if Landon didn't have constant high level instruction...his own pool table and could only have learned the game in smokey pool rooms he wouldn't be the player he is.

Regards,
Jim

av84fun
04-30-2008, 04:24 PM
Lessons can be helpful, but it's extremely important not to feel like you're "on the clock". Tony can certainly improve your game, but see if he's willing to work with you "by the session" or "by the day", and "NOT" by the hour.

I'm sure he would but all "sessions" and "days" are divisible by the number of hours involved so I don't see the difference.


Regards,
Jim

Scott Lee
04-30-2008, 08:13 PM
Joel...You get the lion's share of the credit for your improvement. EVERY time we have been together, you have come to the lesson with specific questions and goals...WRITTEN DOWN. We addressed together, each issue, and came to a solution to the problem. However, you're the one who put in the time and effort to practice those solutions, until they became easily overcome! Your progress from last June to now is, without being understated, simply excellent!...and you're gonna love the Xpert Class in June, with Randyg. Congratulations, and kudos to you, my friend! :D

Scott Lee
www.poolknowledge.com

Maybe my point of view is slanted because I have been a public school teacher for 30 years. I firmly believe that if a person is willing to practice what he learns he will benefit greatly.

I went to pool school last summer with Randyg and Scott lee. I went from a 4 in the apa to a 6 within a couple of months. I firmly believe that they helped fix some flaws in my stroke that made the difference. I feel you need someone who will not only teach you what you want to learn but also point out some problems he sees.
.
My advice, take some lessons. Not just one, but several. You will be suprised what you don't know. Then practice what they teach you. Good luck.

Justlovecues
04-30-2008, 08:34 PM
Hey everyone me again I wanted to ask all of u if u felt if pool lessons really helped. From what I was always able to gather it was more of a practice game meaning the more you practice and play the more you will get better. Over the ears I have learned that is not the case as you are always learning in this game. I am in ny and am debating starting lessons with tony robles has anyone had experience with him? I have met him before and watched him play and he is definitely someone I would love to model my game after. Any insights would be appreciated.
I had my lesson with Tony Robles just a few hours ago. He is, like his friend Mr. Diamond would say, ACES!!! Aside from just helping to build your confidence and being just so inspirational, his appoach to teaching fundamentals is just 'rock solid'. I just recently aquired what we call a 'stroke'. Tony, told me it would come in time and he was right. He mentioned how my hard work is paying off and how it would get so much better. Tony, in my opinion, would be a great investment for you. He was for me and continues to be. Tony Robles is a GREAT coach and a FANTASTIC human being. Viva TONY ROBLES!

Cuaba
04-30-2008, 10:07 PM
Mark Wilson took my game from a decent bar table league player to a strong big table shortstop.

The right teacher will definitely improve your game.

jay helfert
04-30-2008, 10:47 PM
Tony Robles, Mark Wilson, Scott Lee and Randy G. I'd add Jerry Breisath to this list as well. If you can't learn something from these guys, you just weren't paying attention.

Now if you want to learn something about One Pocket strategies, from basic to advanced, I know just the guy in Southern Cal to help you. :)

mullyman
04-30-2008, 10:51 PM
Lessons will only help if you're willing to take what you learned in that lesson and practice your ass off. Just a lesson isn't worth much.
MULLY