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-   -   Aluminum Strut Frame and Adjusters for Slate? (https://forums.azbilliards.com/showthread.php?t=498414)

mchnhed 08-19-2019 08:32 PM

Aluminum Strut Frame and Adjusters for Slate?
 
2 Attachment(s)
Could something like this work for a pool slate?

realkingcobra 08-20-2019 06:26 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mchnhed (Post 6460930)
Could something like this work for a pool slate?

How would you use it if the slate is screwed to the frame of the table, and the table is assembled?

cnyncrvr 08-20-2019 07:05 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by realkingcobra (Post 6461149)
How would you use it if the slate is screwed to the frame of the table, and the table is assembled?


My question would be the same ask RKC's but RKC do you think in theory and with further development especially in how you would attach the slate to the aluminum profile it could work and reliably so?

realkingcobra 08-20-2019 07:35 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cnyncrvr (Post 6461167)
My question would be the same ask RKC's but RKC do you think in theory and with further development especially in how you would attach the slate to the aluminum profile it could work and reliably so?

I understand how it works, the problem is when the slates are mounted to the frame in which it sits on, having the ability to lift and level the slates requires that the slate have some kind of upward movement, which can't happen when the slate is screwed to the frame. If you have to break a table down in order to level the slates, then reassemble it afterwards, then the leveling system is no better than using wooden wedges, which cost a hell of a lot less.

bradsh98 08-20-2019 07:37 AM

Like this?

https://www.rasson.cn/victory

realkingcobra 08-20-2019 07:40 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bradsh98 (Post 6461194)

I've seen the Rasson 9ft, the newest one, and the leveling system is only useful when setting the table up, not after it's been fully assembled. And since you like to point out things, then on the same table, point out that the rail design is a disaster, and after about 3-5 recoveries you're going to be screwed recovering the rails.

bradsh98 08-20-2019 08:15 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by realkingcobra (Post 6461196)
I've seen the Rasson 9ft, the newest one, and the leveling system is only useful when setting the table up, not after it's been fully assembled. And since you like to point out things, then on the same table, point out that the rail design is a disaster, and after about 3-5 recoveries you're going to be screwed recovering the rails.

I haven't seen one of these yet, so I can't comment on the design.

The intended design of this leveling system is to allow for adjustments throughout the life of the table. Whether it works in practice, I don't know. But, that is the intent, according to the company's literature.

realkingcobra 08-20-2019 08:43 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bradsh98 (Post 6461228)
I haven't seen one of these yet, so I can't comment on the design.

The intended design of this leveling system is to allow for adjustments throughout the life of the table. Whether it works in practice, I don't know. But, that is the intent, according to the company's literature.

Look at where the levelers are. Picture where the rail bolts are, then picture the 3 piece slate, and where the levelers are in relation to the slate seams. Now picture this exact same leveling system on any GC. Picture the slate screws holding the slate seams in place, and all the slate screws mounting the slate to the frame, then picture the heads of the slate mounting screws/bolts covered with cloth, and rails bolted on. How is it going to work to adjust the level of the slate 6 months down the road once the table has acclimated to its environment, and needs to be fine tuned for level....again. That is the very reason there's so many GC's out of level around the country in pool rooms and homes. No seems to want to relieve the slates during the recovery because it takes extra time, and most don't know how to correctly level the slates in the first place. Would it blow your mind if I told you 99% of the so called table mechanics in this country can't even use the Diamond leveling system correctly? Hell, they can't even use the Brunswick leveling system correctly, which is why they still use wedges instead of the leveling system. And as far as that goes, you can't even come back on the GC4, 5, or 6 and use the leveling system without taking the table apart so you can ack of on the mounting screws....and you CAN'T level the slates without being able to back off on the slate seam screws first....which requires taking the tables apart, and pulling up the bed cloth.

bradsh98 08-20-2019 09:03 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by realkingcobra (Post 6461253)
Look at where the levelers are. Picture where the rail bolts are, then picture the 3 piece slate, and where the levelers are in relation to the slate seams. Now picture this exact same leveling system on any GC. Picture the slate screws holding the slate seams in place, and all the slate screws mounting the slate to the frame, then picture the heads of the slate mounting screws/bolts covered with cloth, and rails bolted on. How is it going to work to adjust the level of the slate 6 months down the road once the table has acclimated to its environment, and needs to be fine tuned for level....again. That is the very reason there's so many GC's out of level around the country in pool rooms and homes. No seems to want to relieve the slates during the recovery because it takes extra time, and most don't know how to correctly level the slates in the first place. Would it blow your mind if I told you 99% of the so called table mechanics in this country can't even use the Diamond leveling system correctly? Hell, they can't even use the Brunswick leveling system correctly, which is why they still use wedges instead of the leveling system. And as far as that goes, you can't even come back on the GC4, 5, or 6 and use the leveling system without taking the table apart so you can ack of on the mounting screws....and you CAN'T level the slates without being able to back off on the slate seam screws first....which requires taking the tables apart, and pulling up the bed cloth.

But these tables are not Gold Crowns... They are Rasson tables. I'm not sure why you are making a comparison. The design seems fairly clever, in that the slate screw threads into a sliding block. There is an adjuster on the bottom side. It seems that you should be able to make the adjustments from the bottom side of the table, without a need to access the slate screw.

The OP asked if this design could be used on pool table slate. I'm not sure why he would ask, as this is the exact design that is used on select Rasson pool tables. I just figured that he was trolling, so I posted the link to the Rasson page.

I'm not looking to argue with you. I really don't care. I've not yet worked on a Rasson Victory table, and likely won't get the opportunity. I live in an area where Brunswick Gold Crown I's and Olhausen residential tables are in abundance.

realkingcobra 08-20-2019 10:17 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bradsh98 (Post 6461284)
But these tables are not Gold Crowns... They are Rasson tables. I'm not sure why you are making a comparison. The design seems fairly clever, in that the slate screw threads into a sliding block. There is an adjuster on the bottom side. It seems that you should be able to make the adjustments from the bottom side of the table, without a need to access the slate screw.

The OP asked if this design could be used on pool table slate. I'm not sure why he would ask, as this is the exact design that is used on select Rasson pool tables. I just figured that he was trolling, so I posted the link to the Rasson page.

I'm not looking to argue with you. I really don't care. I've not yet worked on a Rasson Victory table, and likely won't get the opportunity. I live in an area where Brunswick Gold Crown I's and Olhausen residential tables are in abundance.

Ok, I understand that, but just a though here. When you level the seams of the slate, do you only shim one side of the slate to make the seam flat, or if needed, do you shim both sides of the seam until its flat and level? How many leveling points are at the seam of the slate with the pictured leveling system?

bradsh98 08-20-2019 11:39 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by realkingcobra (Post 6461382)
Ok, I understand that, but just a though here. When you level the seams of the slate, do you only shim one side of the slate to make the seam flat, or if needed, do you shim both sides of the seam until its flat and level? How many leveling points are at the seam of the slate with the pictured leveling system?

I see where you're going with this, and I agree. If the concept of the leveler itself works, I think that is fine. But, the placement is a bit off, and there should be more locations than what they currently have. There is nothing in the center of each slate, so there is no way to address sag (which will occur). Also, only having one location at the center of the seam does not allow for much adjustment at all.

This design would be fine, if slates were always perfectly flat (and stayed that way). However, the effects of gravity will always come into play.


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