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-   -   How to retip cues...... without a lathe (https://forums.azbilliards.com/showthread.php?t=51018)

catscradle 01-09-2007 06:25 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Inzombiac
STICKY THIS DANGIT lol!

Great work! Its things like this that layman like me need. I've yet to do any "home repair" of my gear but I've always liked to be more hands on with any kinds of fixes instead of taking it to someone. And now the knowledge is passed!

I would suggest practicing on a shaft you don't particularly care about or an old house cue until you know exactly what you're doing. I have done my own tips on less expensive cues and do a pretty good job, but I maintain it is a rare person who does as good or better job by hand than a cuesmith with a lathe does. I've watched Mike Webb do tips amazingly fast and always perfect, my tips done by hand are never perfect.
It can be done, but it takes patience to do a good job. Rivercity probably has the patience and this is a good post, but if you find you don't have the patience don't try this on your good cue. Of course, it is also true that having a lathe doesn't guarantee a good job, it takes practice and skill.

Aaron_S 01-09-2007 06:27 AM

Great post! This is precisely the method, right down to the glue, that I've used for 10+ years putting all sorts of tips on my cues, and I can definitely vouch for this method. I also spend a fair bit of time burnishing the tip and ferrule. It gives a nice, finished look to the tip, and it restores the luster to the ferrule that is lost during sanding. The only tip I have not tried this method with is the Sniper; I was just too scared considering the cost of the tip. I have tried it with other layered tips, though, and with great results.

Cheez Dawg 01-09-2007 06:39 AM

Great write-up. Very thorough and informative. Points for you!!:D

chefjeff 01-09-2007 06:47 AM

I would add one step: Clean the shaft before/during/after with a little alcohol on a cloth. Any chalk near your tools can scratch the ferrule/shaft.

One other caveat re. that particular brand of sanding tool for the end of the ferrule: I've seen some of these that are NOT exactly 90 degrees square. So, when buying one at the store, double check to be sure it is perfectly square or else your tip will be slanted.

Nice thread for us cheapskates.

Jeff Livingston

Maniac 01-09-2007 08:07 AM

Nice post with good pics!!! I pretty much use this method when I re-tip my cues. Still don't have enough confidence in my abilities to do my good shafts yet:( , but I do all my house cues. One thing I do differently is that instead of Post-It notes, I wrap the ferrule with blue masking tape (the kind painters use), even all the way down the entire shaft so there is no chance of Super Glue getting on my shaft. It don't cost much and I'd rather be safe than sorry.

Maniac

NaturalEnglish 01-09-2007 08:19 AM

I also use blue painters tape. No glue residue. Good idea to go all the way down the shaft. When you tape part of the shaft...the tape removes chalk stains and it looks weird. So wrapping the whole shaft cleans the whole shaft! haha

Klopek 01-09-2007 02:14 PM

I use a similar method to you with a few variations. I actually want glue to squirt out from unbder the tip because it means there'll be no gaps between the tip and ferrule outer edge.

Before I use my cuetop sander, I apply painters tape around the end of the ferrule leaving some sticking above the face. I trim it close to flush and then sand it flush with the ferrule. When I glue the tip on, any glue that squirts out sticks to the tape and not the ferrule.

Another trick I picked up from a Bert Kinister video is to use drywall sandpaper to take the old tip down and rough up the ferrule/tip. It works quickly and leaves just enough of a rough surface for a perfect bond. I've used this for putting on phenolic tips and haven't had any pop off. It looks like screen door material, a mesh. Doesn't clog up.

Klopek 01-09-2007 02:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Deadon
After the tip is applied and dried. Take a smooth block of wood and hold the shaft vertically tip down on the wood. Use a razor blade or a good utility bland and trim down from the ferrule to end of the tip. Using the edge of the ferrul as a guide. Take small pieces and rotate the shaft as you cue through.

This is how I trim my tips flush. I use a blade from a wood plane. It's straight across and has a flush one sided blade (flat on one side, bevelled on the other). Works great for trimming perfectly flush. Might invest in a porper Big Shaver but I really didn't like the mushroom grazer.

The Piper 01-09-2007 02:44 PM

Ok the Porper's big shaver is kinda a dent in the wallet. what other tool is as efficient or as easy to use as that one? The Cut rite shown on Seyberts retipping package? The Willards Tip Tool is definitely out the question. That was the one that my local pool hall used until they closed.

RiverCity 01-09-2007 03:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by The Piper
Ok the Porper's big shaver is kinda a dent in the wallet. what other tool is as efficient or as easy to use as that one? The Cut rite shown on Seyberts retipping package? The Willards Tip Tool is definitely out the question. That was the one that my local pool hall used until they closed.

Avoid the cutrite....... cuts at an angle, and can cut a chamfer on the end of the ferrule. You can use a razor knife to rough cut the sides, but you will still end up having to sand it down. On layered tips, I would be hesitant of cutting with a razor knife etc against the layers for fear of delamination problems.
The Big Shaver is so nice because it is adjustable, and makes quick work out of the task, with pretty much no fear of damaging the ferrule. After years of experimenting with exacto knives, mushroom grazers.... hell even dremel tools :D I feel it is well worth the investment!
Other than drying time, it takes me about 10-15 minutes to do a tip. Half hour if you include the drying time of the glue.
Chuck

Tommy-D 01-09-2007 04:43 PM

How to retip cues...... without a lathe
 
> I did my own tips for years with my own variations on the techniques and materials here,and it CAN be done well enough that unless a full-time cuemaker or one of the top repair guys does the work on a lathe,it won't cosmetically look any nicer. I developed my style well enough that the other 2 guys in my immediate area that do repairs on a semi-regular basis were losing customers to me before I even had a lathe. One of them has one of the first Porper repair lathes,the other has the small headstock Deluxe Cuesmith. People could look at my work,done by similar methods,and theirs,done on a suitable machine,and tell the difference. I won't say I can put a better tip on like this than Joe Blackburn or Varney for example can on their lathes,but there are a lot of people that have decent equipment to work with and can't put a decent tip on to save their lives. The guy locally that has the Porper was using a piece of leather to burnish a tip,on a Predator ferrule which are notoriously thin and soft,and I swear melted the damn thing all the way to the core.Then,he tried to replace it with the soft paper fiber/epoxy house cue type ferrule,at an additional cost of 25 bucks. I was handed the shaft 20 minutes later. Tommy D.

Jack Madden 01-09-2007 04:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by catscradle
I would suggest practicing on a shaft you don't particularly care about or an old house cue until you know exactly what you're doing. I have done my own tips on less expensive cues and do a pretty good job, but I maintain it is a rare person who does as good or better job by hand than a cuesmith with a lathe does. I've watched Mike Webb do tips amazingly fast and always perfect, my tips done by hand are never perfect.
It can be done, but it takes patience to do a good job. Rivercity probably has the patience and this is a good post, but if you find you don't have the patience don't try this on your good cue. Of course, it is also true that having a lathe doesn't guarantee a good job, it takes practice and skill.

I have heard good stuff about Mike's work from a mutual customer - practice, skill and a lathe do make it look easy. But if you don't have a lathe, you can use a regular drill motor. Years ago, I couldn't afford a lathe and lived in a condo so couldn't buy one if I wanted. So I mounted a drill motor to the dining room table (kids swore they wouldn't tell their Mom;) ;) ) - used it to clean my shafts and put on tips. Most cuemakers have some funky piece of equipment - one of mine is from a motorcycle.:D
Jack
www.johnmaddencues.com

rackem 01-09-2007 04:53 PM

3 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by The Piper
Ok the Porper's big shaver is kinda a dent in the wallet. what other tool is as efficient or as easy to use as that one? The Cut rite shown on Seyberts retipping package? The Willards Tip Tool is definitely out the question. That was the one that my local pool hall used until they closed.

I have show these Pencil Sharpener looking trimmers before. They work great for me. I got my original one at a trade show a couple of years ago. These reproductions came of ebay from Germany. My original which was black and also says Germany. It is made little better made. I have never seen them from an USA supplier I have some extras but I really don't think its worth the shipping. Like I said before, One of the blue tip trimmers is a freebie while they last to any one who purchases a cue or case from me. please check my FS threads.

catscradle 01-10-2007 04:31 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jack Madden
I have heard good stuff about Mike's work from a mutual customer - practice, skill and a lathe do make it look easy. But if you don't have a lathe, you can use a regular drill motor. Years ago, I couldn't afford a lathe and lived in a condo so couldn't buy one if I wanted. So I mounted a drill motor to the dining room table (kids swore they wouldn't tell their Mom;) ;) ) - used it to clean my shafts and put on tips. Most cuemakers have some funky piece of equipment - one of mine is from a motorcycle.:D
Jack
www.johnmaddencues.com

Actually I also use a drill though I don't mount it on anything. Cornerman turned me on to creating a "bit" to hold the shaft out of a crutch tip. Works pretty darn good.
I was thinking of getting this drill mount to mount it, but I'd have to go down in the basement to a bench (my wife wouldn't let me mount it to the kitchen table:rolleyes: :D ).

catscradle 01-10-2007 04:34 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rackem
I have show these Pencil Sharpener looking trimmers before. They work great for me. I got my original one at a trade show a couple of years ago. These reproductions came of ebay from Germany. My original which was black and also says Germany. It is made little better made. I have never seen them from an USA supplier I have some extras but I really don't think its worth the shipping. Like I said before, One of the blue tip trimmers is a freebie while they last to any one who purchases a cue or case from me. please check my FS threads.

I've seen those advertised in Mueller's catalog I think, but that looks like quite a significant taper.


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