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-   -   How to retip cues...... without a lathe (https://forums.azbilliards.com/showthread.php?t=51018)

The Piper 01-10-2007 05:37 AM

I have the mushroom grazer but had a bad incident where I grazed my ferrule, and I know that wouldn't be something I would want to use to bring down the tip.

On the Big Shaver do you have to use special colletts like the Willards? Or is it pretty much it does all differernt shaft diameters and tapers?

RiverCity 01-10-2007 08:58 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by The Piper
I have the mushroom grazer but had a bad incident where I grazed my ferrule, and I know that wouldn't be something I would want to use to bring down the tip.

On the Big Shaver do you have to use special colletts like the Willards? Or is it pretty much it does all differernt shaft diameters and tapers?

No collets, it has an adjusting screw (plastic, that rides on the ferrule when the tip is in the shaver). I havent measured it, but would guess you could go up to about 14.5mm through the bore.
Chuck

catscradle 01-10-2007 09:07 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RiverCity
No collets, it has an adjusting screw (plastic, that rides on the ferrule when the tip is in the shaver). I havent measured it, but would guess you could go up to about 14.5mm through the bore.
Chuck

This guy came in a room I used to frequent and his ferrule had this huge, deep groove in it. I knew that it had to be from tightened that adjusting screw up more and more each time he changed or trimmed a tip. I was always very, very careful how much I tightened it when I used the big shaver. I have the Willards tipping machine now, kind of expensive but works great.

Rod 01-10-2007 10:29 AM

I have a crutch tool a drill and a dremmel. Putting on tips is no problem and I never touch the ferrule except for some 4000 to polish. It takes some patience but if your good with your hands, no problem.

I should add those rapid top sanders (which I never use) cut down your ferrule and sands at a slight angle if your shaft is not a straight pro taper.

Rod

1hit1der 01-10-2007 11:02 AM

Has anyone here tried using the Pocket Lathe to do tips? Just wondering how well it works since it looks like a very inexpensive alternative to getting a real lathe. Thanks.

http://www.pocketlathe.com/

Hidy Ho 01-10-2007 11:31 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RiverCity
No collets, it has an adjusting screw (plastic, that rides on the ferrule when the tip is in the shaver). I havent measured it, but would guess you could go up to about 14.5mm through the bore.
Chuck

Nice write up.

I use very similar method when doing my own tip.

I use useless business cards rolled up instead of post-it. Top sander, I don't use the holes as mine is not exactly 90 degrees. I use my hand to turn the sander and eye ball it for flatness.

I also pre-glue the tip (to make sure the glues are soaked) and use blue painter's tape to tape around the ferrule for any glue over-runs. I also use Gel loctite .. way easier to use than the runny stuff.

Thanks for taking the time to post the photos and detailed instructions.

catscradle 01-10-2007 11:51 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 1hit1der
Has anyone here tried using the Pocket Lathe to do tips? Just wondering how well it works since it looks like a very inexpensive alternative to getting a real lathe. Thanks.

http://www.pocketlathe.com/

Doesn't look to effective to me, but I've never tried it.

RiverCity 01-10-2007 07:22 PM

Glad you liked it!
 
Big thanks go out to everyone. Im glad the pictorial went over well!!
Chuck

jondrums 01-11-2007 08:06 AM

sanding fixture
 
1 Attachment(s)
I am surprised nobody has mentioned this easy and free alternative to those fancy sanding jigs. All you need is access to the ceiling joists in your basement. Or if you don't have that, a little imagination, a clamp, and a kitchen cabinet over a flat counter will do.

Just take a scrap piece of wood and drill a 1.5" hole in it with a hole saw. If you don't have a hole saw, then take two scrap pieces clamp them together and make a "v" cut more than halfway into them. Now flip one of them over and you'll have an adjustable square hole. either nail this to the ceiling over your workbench, or clamp it to the top shelf in a kitchen cabinet. Make sure its about 50-55" off the table/counter surface.

Then tape down some sandpaper and go to work - the attached sketch should tell you the rest. Just make small circles with the ferule on the sandpaper.

For the ocd amoung us - you can use a plum-bob to find the exact center below the jig's hole and mark that on the sandpaper. Then stay within a half an inch of that spot during the sanding.

Jon

billyjack 01-11-2007 10:11 PM

I’ve used the Porper Mushroom Grazer on a bunch of tip installations, but it’s tricky to get right. Best way I found is to clamp the tool to a workbench or tabletop and turn the shaft while keeping it aligned parallel. It’s also important to precisely set the depth stop to keep the blade from contacting the ferrule. Forget it for super hard tips like WB or Sumo. A much better way to go, IMO is what I’ll term the “Tape guide method”. Get yourself a 2 or 3 inch dia. Disc sanding mandrel with 100 to 120 grit discs. I use a drill press, but you can also use a hand drill motor with a trigger lock, clamped in a vise or to a tabletop. However you set it up, orient the disc so you can hold the shaft perpendicular to the disc and rotate it smoothly.
After cutting off the old tip and cleaning and squaring the ferrule, I wrap 2 layers of tape around the ferrule. First layer is Scotch tape, 2 laps around. Over that goes 2 layers of blue masking tape. Once all the tape is on, trim it all even to the tip end of the ferrule with a razor blade. Go ahead and glue on your tip. I use Gorilla Glue for all my installs, so the tape protects the ferrule from the inevitable glue squeeze-out. Once glue is set, you ready for tip sizing.
Set your drill for rpm in the 500-1000 area. Rotate the tip smoothly against the disc until you are lightly scuffing the blue tape all around. Go slow and keep the pressure light, so you don’t generate too much heat. Remove the masking tape, and clamp the shaft horizontally in a vise to a tabletop with the ferrule overhanging the edge. Cut a 1 inch wide strip of 320 to 400 grit sandpaper and loop it over the ferrule in an inverted “U”. Pull it back and forth “shoe shine style” to bring the tip down to the level of the scotch tape. Rotate the shaft about a quarter turn at a time and repeat as necessary, being careful not to sand through the scotch tape. Now you’re ready for the final steps.
Peel off the scotch tape, and repeat the above procedure with some 1500 to 2000 grit paper. You want to bring the tip down the last little bit in size to match the ferrule, and polish the ferrule in the same step. Grits this fine won’t remove any measurable amount from the ferrule, but will bring the softer tip material down to size. Spray a few drops of water on the paper and polish until dry. Wipe it down, shape the tip and you’re finished. Done well, you’ll have a burnished tip, nice and even with the now-polished ferrule. Total time to size and finish a glued tip is about 15-20 minutes. I can do it faster than it took to write this, and you can’t tell any difference from a job done on a lathe. If you have a usable drill, total investment of all the materials needed should still leave you change from a $20 bill. I hope this helps those who would like to do their own tips. Any questions, shoot me a PM.

Bill

NervousNovice 06-09-2007 09:27 AM

Is the Porper tip burnisher shown in http://www.seyberts.com/cue_accessor...ages/step9.wmv a good alternative to simply using a piece of leather to burnish the side of the tip? Or is it better to just use the leather? In the video they mentioned the heat built up but in the first post RiverCity talked about how you should avoid heat. What is correct?

How does the Tiger "Insta-Cure+" glue compare to the LocTite Super glue?

ShaneT58 06-09-2007 10:12 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Charlie Edwards
River City...your method is the best. Before I got a lathe I did tips almost exactly the way you explained. Worked great! One small thing I'd like to add is when it comes to the final shaping of the tip, and not having access to a lathe, I found the best shaping tool was Trogdon's shaper. http://trogdoncues.com/tip_shaper.htm It's very quick, easy, and accurate.

You can make these yourself out of PVC pipe. Just find the radius you want and then cut the pipe down the middle and glue in some sand paper. I use 100 grit. They work great.

3andstop 06-09-2007 04:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 1hit1der
Has anyone here tried using the Pocket Lathe to do tips? Just wondering how well it works since it looks like a very inexpensive alternative to getting a real lathe. Thanks.

http://www.pocketlathe.com/

shoot, I've been replacing my own tips for 40 yrs. I have something like that lathe. I put the shaft across my thighs and roll it with my left palm back and forth while I shape things with my right hand. :)

All this new fangled fancy stuff.... :)

RiverCity 06-09-2007 08:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by NervousNovice
Is the Porper tip burnisher shown in http://www.seyberts.com/cue_accessor...ages/step9.wmv a good alternative to simply using a piece of leather to burnish the side of the tip? Or is it better to just use the leather? In the video they mentioned the heat built up but in the first post RiverCity talked about how you should avoid heat. What is correct?

How does the Tiger "Insta-Cure+" glue compare to the LocTite Super glue?

Avoid the Porper tool..... the only thing they are really good for is REMOVING poorly installed tips. And if you bear down, you can remove a well installed tip also.
As far as the heat goes, sanding with 800 or 1500 grit etc creates more friction and heat than a smoother material such as leather. Dont get me wrong, you can overdo it with leather too...... you want a little heat but not to the point of feeling like you are burning your fingertips.
I stick with leather, its worked for years and years and is relatively safe.
Chuck

NervousNovice 06-11-2007 10:49 PM

How many tips can the 0.14oz bottle of LocTite super glue last? Also, you talked about letting the glue soak in the tip. How long should that take? In seconds? Minutes? Does the glue dry up very fast?


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