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  1. Tin Man

    Are professionals supposed to call fouls on themselves?

    Hey JV and Pool playa, some very good responses. JV, we're on the same page. I also agree with you that in today's actual (not hypothetical) world, the social standard is definitely that we ought to call foul on ourselves. For that reason I do so, and I applaud others that do the same. Where...
  2. Tin Man

    Are professionals supposed to call fouls on themselves?

    It seems this is too big a leap to make for many but let's try. What if one of the rules was that the opponent had to play the role of a referee and it was their responsibility to call foul? Then what rule are we breaking by not doing their job? This whole thread is fascinating to me. People...
  3. Tin Man

    Are professionals supposed to call fouls on themselves?

    You took that entirely out of context. The question was regarding whether something is wrong if everyone accepted and played that way. Therefor the part about an advantage they “should” have doesn’t apply. I won’t restate my last two posts. They are there if you want to read them.
  4. Tin Man

    Are professionals supposed to call fouls on themselves?

    I can think of many other examples. Take pattern racking as one. There was a time when pattern racking was considered a strategic part of the game. But many players and fans thought this took from the game, so many tournament directors instituted a rule saying "No pattern racking". What's...
  5. Tin Man

    Are professionals supposed to call fouls on themselves?

    Thank you for the good conversation Dyno. I'll save any other thoughts for my next post below.
  6. Tin Man

    Are professionals supposed to call fouls on themselves?

    Yes. Social norms. Like how societal views change on divorce, premarital sex, marijuana, or a number of other things. Let me give you another. Early concessions. In the 90s, it was totally normal to concede the last ball during a money game. Often times people would make multiple ball...
  7. Tin Man

    Are professionals supposed to call fouls on themselves?

    It irritates me when people think there is something intrinsically good or bad about this subject. This is all about social norms. When I played in the 90s no one called foul on themselves. It was on your opponent to play the role as the ref. This was also during the days of more money...
  8. Tin Man

    What kicking system would you use for this shot?

    I would have kicked towards the end rail closest the camera. No system exactly. I know that the line from the side to the middle of the end rail leads approximately to the other side. If you parallel shift that line over the cue ball you can see you're likely to kick just past the upper side...
  9. Tin Man

    2022 US Open 9-Ball

    It changed from 2019 to 2021. It hasn't stayed the same more than a couple of years in a row at any time. I don't think it would ever make sense to assume it wouldn't change. That said, I don't know that MR has made any official announcements yet. I don't think they'll commit to anything...
  10. Tin Man

    Eyes Closed

    I probably shoot 5 blindfolded shots a month, usually to demo for a student. For my students I have them shoot about 5 this way. It is done for the specific reason of making sure they are locked on their aim and tip, to break them of the habit of waiting for a moment they feel good and then...
  11. Tin Man

    Interesting video about elbow drop

    Great video!
  12. Tin Man

    Eyes Closed

    Matt, this is a good thread and a good learning technique. In pool there are three main variables on each shot: Aim, tip position, and swing speed. The problem many people have is that all three are bouncing around like the 7s on a slot machine. They feel their aim is right, then they wiggle...
  13. Tin Man

    Back swing - pause/no pause is focusing on the wrong area of the stroke!

    Yes. Busty is a perfect example. I just watched a few of his shots from the derby big foot vs Filler and it was hypnotic. Siming Chen, Chris Melling, Buddy Hall, SVB. Those are some of my favorites to watch. Busty just made the list!
  14. Tin Man

    One pocket WWYD - After Break

    This was the shot I jumped to, assuming there is a reasonable zone to land the cue ball and deny a shot. If not I probably park the cue ball on top of the rack, even if it means I can't control the speed of the 14 as well as I'd like.
  15. Tin Man

    Back swing - pause/no pause is focusing on the wrong area of the stroke!

    Thanks Kollegedave! I agree that all three parts of the stroke are important. 1) The relaxed backswing (whether it is in slow-motion or just unhurried), 2) the relaxed transition (whether there is a pronounced pause or just letting the cue come to a stop naturally before starting a forward...
  16. Tin Man

    Back swing - pause/no pause is focusing on the wrong area of the stroke!

    Thank you FeelDaShot! I like this community. Most people are very appreciative and pleasant, and there are a ton of super knowledgeable players that have a lot to offer. There will always be a few bumps along the way but as I discovered in this thread it is more often a misunderstanding...
  17. Tin Man

    Back swing - pause/no pause is focusing on the wrong area of the stroke!

    Yes,that's exactly what I'm saying. Most people start too fast and decelerate through the cue ball (which means they move their cue twice as hard as they should with a sudden lurch with terrible impacts to their accuracy). The correct feel is to start the cue slowly and softly, and let it pick...
  18. Tin Man

    Back swing - pause/no pause is focusing on the wrong area of the stroke!

    Thanks Poolplaya! Yes, big difference between cue speed and acceleration. The cue speed should start slow and increase during the swing. The acceleration should be steady. Now, that is just in terms of a mental picture. It may indeed be that the acceleration increases as well. I think of...
  19. Tin Man

    Back swing - pause/no pause is focusing on the wrong area of the stroke!

    Awesome. I do agree that slowing everything down helps a lot. When I first started ironing out my forward swing I used a slow-motion back swing, then a pause, then a slow motion start to my forward swing, then I'd let my cue accelerate. It felt REALLY GOOD! Over time my back swing has become...
  20. Tin Man

    Back swing - pause/no pause is focusing on the wrong area of the stroke!

    Thanks Bob. Lot of nuance to the elbow and shoulder movement. To me the underlying question isn't "Yes or no", so much as "Is it required to the point that someone should relearn how to stroke to incorporate it?" To me I consider that a no. If it happens organically that is fine, but I'm not...
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