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skipbales
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Thanks - 11-28-2019, 06:38 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott Lee View Post
Skip...In your heart you already know the answer...you simply cannot defeat physics (no matter what some pro player says). The dwell time is so short, between CB and cuetip, that the CB is already gone before you could physically 'flick' your wrist. The wrist is already a universal joint (like the shoulder), meaning it can move in any direction, so it's highly susceptible to changes in grip pressure, which can affect the outcome significantly. So timing becomes everything. It's already difficult enough to coordinate everything that makes up a perfect pendulum stroke, without adding crazy thoughts like "snapping your wrist"...sorry, but the CB is gone in a quarter of an eye blink...long before you could initiate a wrist movement, forward or backwards. That's physics. Stick with what I showed you. Take measure of your shooting template; revisit your entire routine...including the PEP. PRACTICE your Mother Drills (20 minutes, twice a day)! Like randyg says, "there's only a good stroke and a bad stroke". Use what I taught you to make your 'good' stroke, your very best! Trust your stroke!

Scott Lee

Director, SPF National Pool School Tour
Hey Scott, thanks for the input. Of course I never mentioned or considered a flick of the wrist nor the time on the cue ball. All that goes without saying. It is all about what you do to generate stick speed prior to impact.

What I discovered was the motion you teach is controlled almost exclusively by the forearm. It is also the most accurate method for a very wide range of shots. It works best for me if the muscles in the hand and fingers do not try to "help". I feel the muscles in my forearm constrict and lift (towards the chest as you demonstrate). The hands and wrist just need to be relaxed and allow the stick to force them to hinge and unhinge as needed to accommodate. That is the stroke and is by far the most useful stroke.

That said when you just need a tiny tap, the forearm is too powerful and does not seem to have a good range in the under 24" area. For that there is not enough take back or follow through to need it. Those shots are really finesse and (for me anyway) need the precision of "touch" controlled by the hands, wrist and fingers.

Finally, on real power shots combining the biceps, forearm and wrist in a coordinated motion seems to develop the most power. I see many (even pros) who employ the entire body. I don't think the body adds much, if anything, to the power. It is slow and ponderous, also difficult to manage. But precocking wrist and realeasing it through the down arc of the swing increases the stick speed for that portion of the arc. This is true in all stick and ball games. It doesn't affect the time at impact but increases the speed before and through impact. Speed = power (or distance). This is the most powerful and least accurate stroke. It is the least accurate because of all the variables, even without huge body movements.

The main take away from this discussion for me is how important keeping the hand and wrist neutral on most strokes is. It is so easy to unconsciously tighten the grip and squeeze or twist or force the cue forward and change the speed from what the shooter's subconscious intended. Just like it is important to reverse this process on a very soft tap type shot. No forearm there or you will have trouble hitting soft enough.

As always, thank you for your training and your support. Happy thanksgiving.
Skip

Last edited by skipbales; 11-28-2019 at 06:53 AM.
  
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