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Ssonerai
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08-14-2019, 02:30 PM

Quote:
What kind of wood to you use normally for bending ?
I used to bend-laminate a lot of cedar and redwood, for outdoor installations. For cabinet work, most of the common lumber - walnut, maple, birch, rarely pine (i just don't get pine jobs),cherry, poplar, both red & white oak, mahogany are some that come to mind.

Poplar is easy to glue and bend, and does not have much memory or springback. I use mahogany for cores on "important" stuff. It glues well, is stable, and provides rot and generally insect resistance. The curved desk sides above are mahogany, with inner face of birch, outer face is big-leaf maple burl.

Cherry and maple are not ideal in terms of glue saturation - almost similar to some exotics, if you don't sand the faces to about 80 gr and use a wait period for the glue to gel, then apply a fresh batch; it can have starved areas even though pressed down solid. (with epoxy - maple might glue better with titebond, but i never do assemblies that can be rolled and clamped up fast enough to use the fast setting glues like Titebond.) All that work, and then suddenly a mess! WEST with slow hardener gives about 20 minutes to get the parts rolled out, and more than an hour to get them assembled. Keep the shop below 70 and the lay-up time is even longer. You do have to use the cotton flocking ("micro fibers") in the mix, for adequate bond in almost any wood lay-up.

Titebond Extend gives an excellent bond for interior work - so long as you can get everything rolled and fully clamped in 15 minutes or less for bent laminations. I use if only for smallish parts. The other factor is that "yellow" glues put a lot of moisture into the part, so you should not machine it immediately. Let it rest 3 days to a week, depending on thickness and number of layers. (More thin layers = more moisture). I have had some parts bend tighter as they dried, with titebond. Not enough to be a factor for the things we are discussing, though.


I saw all my own veneers. (& laminae)
Here is a post on it from a few years ago.
https://www.practicalmachinist.com/v...g-post-303892/

On the project pictured, i did one door with vac, then did another with pressure. Partly as a demonstration. Partly because at the time i was using the pressure system for the larger shelves, and it is just simpler at some level. You might not think so from pics, but it saves all the nuisance of the other plies and the oily vacuum pump running for 6 or 8 hours.
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