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Poolology

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07-22-2019, 09:41 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dan White View Post
I always had a pool table in the house. My earliest memory was standing at opposite sides of the table from my brothers. We would wing balls down the table at each other (on the table surface) trying to hit each other's hands. I also recall watching my father play while images from Vietnam were on the TV.

There seem to be two basic camps - those who go through a particular aiming process such as aiming the shaft a particular way and measuring certain offsets, and those who simply "see" the shot and hit it.

I've always been more of a "hit it when it looks right" player and I grew up around pool. I can't remember my earliest days of playing but the thought occurred to me that those who learn at a young age might be less prone to using well defined aiming methods, and less able to understand why people use them at all.

Am I in the woods on this one?
I agree. When I look back to when I was 16 to 18 years old, there was no YouTube, there were no pool halls close by, and I didn't have any opportunity to obtain instruction via books, DVD's, or private lessons. I first got interested in pool by watching it on tv and watching my dad play at little hole in wall bar about a mile from the house. I'd drink coca cola and eat pistachios while he smoked camel cigarettes and drank whiskey.

When I was about 16 I started to play a couple nights a week at a girlfriend's house. Her dad a pool table. It was trial and error, shooting the cb to where it looked like it needed to be to make the ob go to the pocket. Within a couple of years I got pretty good, better than all my friends, and better than my dad and all of his friends.

I do believe if I'd had a dependable aiming system back then it could've shortened the rote learning process. I mean an aiming system like Poolology or any other method that allows you to develop shot recognition, a good feel for just seeing the shots and knowing them without relying on the system anymore.


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