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justnum
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11-08-2010, 04:55 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnGalt View Post
I think I understand the point of what you're trying to say, and I actually agree with you on some general theories at times, but you type in a style that hurts my head to read. Like fragmented pieces of a dream strung together in a sentence form. I really can't explain it.

If you are saying that all the players should be paid, in full, before everyone considers an event to be successful, then I agree. There are plenty of costs and work involved, which you seem to underestimate. I am aware of these costs and work, but I still think the players should be paid immediately at the conclusion of playing (or next day during business hours, whatever), and there is no excuse for putting players on payment plans. Especially when you run the most prestigious event and all eyes are on you.

Assuming that players will keep coming, because they always do, does not make it acceptable to bait and switch people.

If you say you are going to do something, and then get the ideal situation in which to do it, and you know people are watching to see if you do it, then why not just do it?
For me it was the treatment of the players that just disappointed me. They had tough schedules. They were exposed to the same conditions as fans and vendors. They had no area for themselves.

I have taken some bad jobs and seen a lot of mistreatment at various companies. But what I saw was bad.

My conclusions are the players aren't involved enough with tournaments, like most companies and their employee benefits. It would help if they understood what businesses go through so they can contribute to the solution.

But if people are unwilling to discuss a tournament outside of the payout and prizes it is difficult. How can players help if people don't want to talk about details?

The argument that people just have to sign up and do what they are told is old and does not generate the energy these events need.
  
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