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Imac007
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06-19-2019, 11:38 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by z0nt0n3r View Post
i think that the 'do all your aiming while standing' advice can be dangerous,at least it was for me because for years i was trying to find the right stance/pre-shot routine that would align me perfectly almost everytime to the shot line when in reality,it isn't possible,at least for me no matter how many hours i practice.the advice should be 'do most of your aiming while standing',because many players need to do slight bridge/backhand adjustments when down on the shot.but when you get down and you feel you're aiming way off i think you should get back up and start the process again,maybe the bridge adjustment is only effective when the aiming is very slightly off.
Another way to get aligned is to align the cue first then arrange the body to cue down the target line. This instructor coached the woman who recently shot a snooker 147. Foreign dialogue warning.

https://youtu.be/93xsb5zTaYs
https://youtu.be/uE4mKqUeYc8
https://youtu.be/9IhVTwEcvGw
https://youtu.be/aSzf5IIH-qo

Regardless of how you get there, the line needs to be primary. Iíve seen a snooker coach use rests to prop up a cue on the shot line. Once he aligned a straight in from one end he checked the cue line from the pocket end. Then with help, the rests were removed so he could cue down a known accurate aim line. If the cue is on line then what remains is the cueing action. This helps tell you where you are. Itís hard to arrive at a destination without knowing a starting point.

Shoot cue balls straight into pockets. Try to end with the cue pointing there after the ball is pocketed. Take away the psychological effect of the object ball. This is a good warm up. Lining up then closing your eyes before shooting is a good transition. Hold the finish and open the eyes. Is it still on target. I have used this as a coping strategy when I'm not in stroke. It forces me to trust both aim and cueing.

Regardless of method, line up then lower the cue straight down on the table on the line you chose. Get up and look at the shot from both ends. How was your alignment? Get back from the cue and see if it looks aligned from a distance. Check from the object ball side to see if it appears to aimed correctly.

I no longer grip my cue with a wrap around. My forefinger is triggered when I hold the cue pointed away from my cueing side. My thumb and forefinger only squeeze the cue from the sides. If in the process of shooting I happen to tighten my grip, equal pressure from both sides will not twist the cue off line. The elbow hinge sends the cue down the line.

Take a backswing, stop then lower the cue onto the table. Is it still aligned? Find out where you are at each stage of the shot. Fix things one at a time, if you need to. Multiple problems are harder to diagnose and fix. You need to trust your body. If itís sensing a need to twist the cue to get an outcome, somethingís wrong. Donít diagnose. Get up and start over. Shoot when you donít sense a need to compensate or adjust.

That felt need to add a hand action is a calibration tool. Itís feedback. It predicts. Itís saying that how youíre aligned WONíT WORK without modification. Sense how it would adjust to try to get a better outcome. Use that information when you get up to re-align or decide on a different shot.
  
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