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11-07-2019, 04:10 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by BC21 View Post
Been watching a lot pro 8ball matches lately, and they are reminding me this thread.

There might be a few great instructors out there teaching that practice needs to be geared toward perfect position, never considering any alternate shots that rearrange the plan or sequence that you initially decided to play. But, honestly, I don't think that's being realistic, considering how some of the world's best players play patterns.

I believe if you're practicing full table runouts, not individual shot repetition or cb control, the most beneficial way to practice should match the reality of actually playing, competing. In a real match we seldom run the balls in the exact pattern we initially choose. I watch SVB, Shaw, Pagulayan, and other great players, and each play the game exactly as I do, exactly as countless others do. Of course, they make fewer mistakes, but what I'm talking about is pattern play. Any good player, after deciding how to run a group of balls, takes time after each shot to ensure the initial plan is still the best option.

Pattern play isn't set in stone. There is usually plenty of room for change, and sometimes a new pattern presents itself when you're looking at the table from a different perspective. On occasion, we see a pattern and run the rack very much in tune with that pattern. But anywhere along the way we could easily rearrange a shot or two if that looks like the best option at the time, based on our experience. So when practicing full rack strategy and pattern play, part of what you should be working on is recognizing opportunities that come up, opportunities that may lead to a new and improved pattern. If you practice tunnel vision style, then you'll play that way also.
This is exactly how I see it. I think practice for perfect but accept that no one always gets there and be prepared for alternatives. In play I look for alternatives as part of my initial pattern. I look for patterns that present options.
  
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