Thread: Harold Worst
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PoolBum
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10-04-2017, 04:23 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by jay helfert View Post
I never heard that story, although he did play great snooker. I only saw him play Cornbread Red in the finals of the snooker division in Detroit in 1963. Red was a great snooker player also and it went down to the last game with Harold winning. They also played in the 9-Ball finals (Worst won again) and the One Pocket finals (Red got that one). There were a lot of good players in those events and Red and Harold were the two best of the bunch. I don't think they let Harold play in the Three Cushion division. Either it conflicted with the pool events or he was barred for some reason. No one could have beaten him at that game for certain.

I heard that Worst played Jimmy Moore a big money snooker match during Johnston City and won but I was not there for that one. The Canadian, George Chenier, was the best snooker player in North American at that time, but I have no idea if they ever met or played each other.
Jay, since you're one of the only people still around who was at the Last Supper and who also actually saw all four of these guys play, I'm wondering how you would rank the following four players in terms of their all-around game:

Efren Reyes
Nick Varner
Harold Worst
Luther Lassiter


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