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ShortBusRuss
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06-19-2019, 06:35 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by ENGLISH! View Post
We are currently in 20 year cooling period. Coastal Fisherman who have been fishing from the same pier for 50 years or more have stated that the water line has not changed at all.
Yeah, well... You listen to anectdotal evidence from your fishermen friends as they get drunk and fish, and I will listen to the scientists actually methodically tracking ACTUAL sea level rise.

https://oceanservice.noaa.gov/facts/sealevel.html

Quote:
Originally Posted by People one heckuva lot smarter than you
Global sea level has been rising over the past century, and the rate has increased in recent decades. In 2014, global sea level was 2.6 inches above the 1993 average—the highest annual average in the satellite record (1993-present). Sea level continues to rise at a rate of about one-eighth of an inch per year.
Quote:
What's the difference between global and local sea level?
Global sea level trends and relative sea level trends are different measurements. Just as the surface of the Earth is not flat, the surface of the ocean is also not flat—in other words, the sea surface is not changing at the same rate globally. Sea level rise at specific locations may be more or less than the global average due to many local factors: subsidence, upstream flood control, erosion, regional ocean currents, variations in land height, and whether the land is still rebounding from the compressive weight of Ice Age glaciers.

Sea level is primarily measured using tide stations and satellite laser altimeters. Tide stations around the globe tell us what is happening at a local level—the height of the water as measured along the coast relative to a specific point on land. Satellite measurements provide us with the average height of the entire ocean. Taken together, these tools tell us how our ocean sea levels are changing over time.
  
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