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rhinobywilhite
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02-15-2020, 04:55 PM

More and more customers today want burl wood or lots of figure. Those types of wood can produce problems regarding staying straight, thus, along came coring(and it has been around for many years). Coring can also solve some balance and weight issues issues as well as tonal qualities and hit. Balabushka preferred straight grain woods as did other early builders.

When I started building cues in the early 90's, I measured every cue I could get my hands on.Just when you, as a cuemaker, come up with a taper for the shaft and butt that seems to play well, along comes a player who wants a certain shaft taper. It is difficult to say "no" to your customer(it is his money). The first 8-10 inches from the butt, I tend to use figures that have pleased me and my customers over the years. I like some "meat" in that area.From that point forward on the shaft, I can be more flexible depending on what the customer wants.

Lastly, I would add what most cuemakers over time have determined. Different woods, due to their density, may be used to produce a thinner or thicker butt that is desired by the customer. Those cuemakers also have a regular diameter of a butt that varies from say .850 at the joint and smaller to 1.27" or less at the butt.

Hope this BS was not too long but you did ask, lol.
  
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