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Stones
YEAH, I'M WOOFING AT YOU!
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04-15-2019, 04:14 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott Lee View Post
Great story Stones! Most people here can't even remember paying $.60 an hour rates...although there are a few oldsters (NY Larry for example) that remember a houseman racking and collecting a nickle or dime a game! Thanks for putting a smile on my face!

Scott Lee
http://poolknowledge.com
Thanks, Scott.

Off topic:

When I was 12-13 yrs. old, my friends and I were too young to get into the local poolrooms.

We would ride our bicycles about three miles out into the country to an old icehouse. The store had an old eight foot worn out pool table with clay balls on an open air patio.

The old man that ran the place would charge us a dime a game to play. After each game, he would walk out, collect the dime and rack the balls.

When we started, we played regular 8 ball, but the games went by pretty quick and we didn't have that much money. So, we decided to add "bank the eight" to slow the game down a little bit.

Finally, over the following months, we finally decided to change the game to full rack banks.

It didn't take long for the old man to get upset with us. He told us to go back to regular 8 ball or not come back. LOL


Stones


"A friend will help you move but a good friend will help you move the body."

"My girlfriend doesn't care what I do when I'm away at the poolroom, as long as I don't have a good time."

"Welcome to all Pool Players, Railbirds and Other Liars."

…the old Lakota was wise. He knew that a man’s heart, away from nature, becomes hard; he knew that lack of respect for growing, living things soon led to lack of respect for humans, too. So he kept his children close to nature’s softening influence.
  
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