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highkarate
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09-22-2019, 09:05 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Jewett View Post
Version B, which is how Nick Varner played it: Break however you want. The cue ball remains in position, but a scratch on the break is simply owing a ball for that rack and you get cue ball behind the line. Varner played to scratch on the break and I think a ball would be spotted if he cleared the table. Shoot five racks to see how many you make in total. Hopkins didn't play for a scratch when he was trying to run all 15, he played from where the cue ball ended which was roughly between the side pockets.

I've heard that when the game was introduced around San Francisco the better players lost trying for 20 in five racks. Top players are about even money at 30-35 without ball in hand.
This is the way most people gamble on it. Very good players ned to go to 21, Alex needs to go to 40. An important distinction to make is that you have to choose your pocket before the break. Typically people break by shooting softly into the 1st ball full on and drawing back just a little bit. I thought I found a great break hitting the 2nd ball and drawing into the side rail, but it didn't hold up for the cash. Getting a shot after the break can be very tough


thats just like, your opinion man
  
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