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FranCrimi
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06-27-2019, 12:51 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by z0nt0n3r View Post
well for me i had two main issues,the first was my shoulders were a bit square causing a chicken wing and second was an aiming issue,my cue was placed slightly across the line of aim when down on most shots or i was aiming a hair to the left or right of where i was supposed to.(probably because my head was moving offline when getting down on the shot).the chicken wing would steer the cue slightly sideways on practice strokes/delivery and when i corrected the chicken wing,i still had the aim/cue alignment issue causing the cue to steer sideways once again.it was like a vicious circle.but when i started addressing both variables at the same time,my stroke started straightening out.so far it has been working but i will post here if i encounter more problems.

but someone else could have even more problems like sighting/dominant eye issues or stroke issues like jumping up on the shot,tightening the grip etc and maybe someone could be steering the cue for such a long time that the hitch in the stroke has been ingrained even when removing all the variables and needs practice of physical training to fix.or if someone is a complete beginner then of course he will not have a straight stroke if he just fixes aim and alignment.
Whether or not a player's stroke will straighten out once their alignment is corrected depends on how embedded their stroke compensations were due to their faulty alignment.

When your alignment is off, you will somehow compensate with your stroke, often by twisting or steering or turning your arm inside your torso and restricting your arm swing. Those things can become a habit that could take time to break.
  
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