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Miller
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Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: East St. Louis Area
   
09-09-2013, 11:43 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by 3andstop View Post
I talked about this when I first put it together about 4 years or so ago, I thought it might be of interest to some of you who would rather not do tip replacements completely by hand.

This setup was inexpensive, and with a little modification with some stuff from home depot and a little buzz box welder, that if you don't have, one of your buddies probably does, makes an acceptable rig to do tips, shaft tapering, I even made a tenon and replaced a ferrule with this thing.

Anyway it starts with this device I found on EBAY. I have no affiliation with these people, I just think buying something like this gives you a big headstart to a homemade device. This is the piece I bought a while back.

Here are some photos. Basically its three pieces of hardwood sold at HomeDepot. 1 base and 2 other strips.

Then 4 lengths of bar steel and a few wood bolts. This all provides a base for the lathe parts to slide on.

Next I bought a tall nut and a bolt. I welded a piece of angle iron to it that makes a rest for a wood chisel I use to flush up the tip. I welded that to a small rectangular frame I made from the remaining piece of angle iron.

Flat washers guide the movement along the bar steel nicely.

For a collet over the cue shaft that rides inside those black wheels, I simply used some clear plastic hose, also available at HomeDepot.

I secure the hose from running up and down the shaft with painters tape.

I also use painters tape to help secure the fat end of the shaft to that rubber holder that goes into the drill. I like the setup on this end of the shaft much better than screwing a bolt into the shaft. If your shaft runs out a little on this end because .... after all ... it is a makeshift lathe ... you don't have to worry about snapping the shaft, especially if the shaft threads are directly into the wood with no insert.

Anyway ... it's far from perfect, but it does work perfectly for me and it beats the hell out of rolling the shaft up and down your thighs as you try to sand it!

Oh, and I found a rheostat foot pedal on ebay with the correct amperage so I could regulate the speed of the variable speed drill with my foot.

clever idea and thanks for sharing.

if you don't mind....i am curious about something.....

what is the "rubber holder" that is chucked up to your drill? is it some kind of a jacobs chuck that you purchased somewhere or something that you fabricated yourself? would you mind posting a close up picture of it?

thanks.

  
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