Kingwood Bleeding
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Kingwood Bleeding - 05-10-2016, 09:50 AM

Ive assembled a cue with curly maple and 3 part segmented handle area with intermittent 1/8 inch kingwood rings and maple in between. Anyway, even when Im making my initial passes to taper it to size Im getting some bleeding from the Kingwood. Ive worked with cocobolo alot and I kinda used to the scenario but this stuff really bleeds. Wish I wouldnt have used it. Im dreading getting to the sanding part but with air blowing I think I can keep it to a minimum. When I seal this am I better to just seal the rings with a fine brush and let that set up before sealing the curly maple? I dont think I have many options. Hate to waste that beautiful curly and take it apart. I was thinking about hitting them with lacquer thinner also or maybe ascetone.
  
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Paul Dayton
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05-10-2016, 06:24 PM

What kind of king wood. I've never had a piece of Brazilian king wood bleed. If you are using camatillo, some times called Mexican king wood, you're probably screwed. That stuff bleeds after the finish has cured. You might soak the rings in acetone for a day or two before you use them . This is the ultimate cure for rings. I do it to all my cocobolo rings but I use alcohol, same thing.
  
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Perfect - 05-11-2016, 05:31 PM

Great advise from the Master.......As always.......Ray Weeks
  
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05-12-2016, 05:53 AM

I am NOT a cue maker. I do own a cue made by Dave Kikel that is deep violet and black streaked camatillo. It IS about five years old and been refinished it has never shown any signs of bleeding. When we collaborated on the build it was discussed and he assured me it would be properly sealed and not bleed. He said he had the wood in his shop for over 15 years so perhaps age had something to do with it. That is all I know.........
  
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Talking 05-12-2016, 10:11 AM

Well the cue is already assembled. The rings butt up against the curly maple. Only 2 of them show the bleeding. I guess its the fine powder of the kingwood that gets in the pores of the maple. Hence when I sand it I will have to blow the sh....t out of it in the process to keep it clean. I think I will seal the rings with a fine thin brush and let them dry with a couple of coats of sealer and then seal the maple. Ive really learned my lesson about treating that type of wood before using it. ascetone is another way I think. Just alot more work. If Id have used my head I wouldn't be in this predicament. Oh well, the joys of cue making.
  
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05-12-2016, 12:11 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Dayton View Post
What kind of king wood. I've never had a piece of Brazilian king wood bleed. If you are using camatillo, some times called Mexican king wood, you're probably screwed. That stuff bleeds after the finish has cured. You might soak the rings in acetone for a day or two before you use them . This is the ultimate cure for rings. I do it to all my cocobolo rings but I use alcohol, same thing.
paul.....super post......i have done bsically the same, and also use the acetone to keep issues from appearing from left field when doing my finish work and such with my ca/blo which ends up a flexible copolymer/elastomer

any way....specifically......whats the reason behind you using alcohol instead of acetone and is that just what you do for specifically with just coco?

is the alcohol taking less of the "oil" off the wood and into it some bit but still leaving enough for say weird things like DPK talks about water being a transfer agent across the woods cellular structure?

or did i just go off a cliff and thinking too far out box?

thanks for any words you drop on this subject

regards,
Keebie
  
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05-12-2016, 12:15 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Quesports View Post
I am NOT a cue maker. I do own a cue made by Dave Kikel that is deep violet and black streaked camatillo. It IS about five years old and been refinished it has never shown any signs of bleeding. When we collaborated on the build it was discussed and he assured me it would be properly sealed and not bleed. He said he had the wood in his shop for over 15 years so perhaps age had something to do with it. That is all I know.........
age isn't necessarily a factor.....ive got a specific piece of coco.....mexican coco thats a deep red orange, more on red side....its stupid old....real old....old old old growth....

its sealed.....been sealed for years, was unsealed for years as well.....if i bust through the seal witha solvent or sanding or cutting.....

i swear its impregnated with redorange turpintine lol and its making it like dead dinosaurs make oil in the earth supposedly lol....

i mean.....i could round the end and use the bastard as the worlds biggest crayola marker........

gots that errl lol

gorgeous piece of wood....it just sits there intriguing me....i love the dam thing lol.

regards,
G.G.
  
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05-12-2016, 06:29 PM

The acetone and denatured alcohol work the same but I have the alcohol on hand and my acetone is gone. I cut a LOT of rings in varying thicknesses at one time (500 or more) and run thin wire loops through the ones that are the same thickness then drop the rings into a cup of solvent. cover it with aluminum foil for a day or two, pull them out, spread the same size rings on paper towels, blot them with another towel and store them for future use. The offending oils are gone and forgotten. I haven't bought cocobolo or camatillo since the late 90's and the wood still has all the oils. Some camatillo doesn't bleed, some will bleed like a scalp wound.
  
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