Old
  (#16)
lfigueroa
AzB Silver Member
lfigueroa has a reputation beyond reputelfigueroa has a reputation beyond reputelfigueroa has a reputation beyond reputelfigueroa has a reputation beyond reputelfigueroa has a reputation beyond reputelfigueroa has a reputation beyond reputelfigueroa has a reputation beyond reputelfigueroa has a reputation beyond reputelfigueroa has a reputation beyond reputelfigueroa has a reputation beyond reputelfigueroa has a reputation beyond repute
 
Status: Offline
Posts: 13,075
vCash: 500
iTrader: 6 / 100%
Join Date: Oct 2005
   
07-02-2019, 06:16 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Imac007 View Post
A few things came to mind after reading the question posed. The first was a quote attributed to Achille-Claude Debussy, "music is the space between the notes". Rhythm and tempo are essential to establishing a performance flow. Another is a weather observation often used as an metaphor, "the calm before the storm". This suggests that the gathering of forces can create a calm space before unleashing the forces. This is like how a spring has to be compressed before it can function.

This last insight triggers a reminder of the concept of functional intent. If you want to create a flowing tempo or a preparatory rhythm, each is a particular intent and functionally different. Once the objective is decided on then how the preliminary actions can lead to that end can be considered.

Bouncing a ball, like a tennis player before a serve or a basketball player before a free throw are examples of loosening up preparatory movement. Movement dissipates stress having a calming effect.

The comments here give each of us glimpses into how certain actions are taken to achieve various ends. There is no right answer, only a variety of choices. Itís also situational like the "winners", the guy and his girlfriend.

The preliminary movements can be whatever you want them to be. Asking how they work in each of our gameís brings out the function they serve there. Awareness allows us to give them positive purpose.

Personally I estimate if the shot, as envisioned, will succeed during this phase. If not, I get up and start over. If I predict success I stop, find my target again and shoot.

Good question.

I think it was John Coltrane who said, "The notes you don't play are as important as those you do."

The whole thing about tempo and movement is centered around giving your body sufficient time to get all body parts in a desirable/optimal position to execute the shot. To fast or slow and something is going to be out of position. I think changing your tempo -- usually slowing down in an effort to be more careful -- is one of the leading causes of players missing under pressure.

So I will give something away that I learned about my game: I think most of us struggle with combination shots. I'm not talking about frozen or near frozen shots but rather those where the balls are perhaps a foot apart and the pocket an additional foot away. I have always hated those shots primarily because of how badly I'd hit them.

And then one day I noted that on these shots my warm up strokes were coming to a complete stop. My stroke would freeze up as I concentrated on the shot -- it was something I wasn't doing on any other shot. So I had to begin to make a conscious effort to keep my warm up strokes going on combo shots and it has helped me tremendously. Maybe someone else will find value in this observation.

Lou Figueroa
  
Reply With Quote

Old
  (#17)
Imac007
AzB Silver Member
Imac007 has a reputation beyond reputeImac007 has a reputation beyond reputeImac007 has a reputation beyond reputeImac007 has a reputation beyond reputeImac007 has a reputation beyond reputeImac007 has a reputation beyond reputeImac007 has a reputation beyond reputeImac007 has a reputation beyond reputeImac007 has a reputation beyond reputeImac007 has a reputation beyond reputeImac007 has a reputation beyond repute
 
Status: Offline
Posts: 217
vCash: 500
iTrader: 0 / 0%
Join Date: Dec 2017
   
07-03-2019, 12:35 PM

Thanks for the positive feedback, Brian. It’s encouraging as posts often seem to land without impact. Knowing someone at least read what was posted is nice.

As some of my teammates would remind me "he talks a good game". Knowledge translates at the table into performance, if we let it. That often is the hard part. Those of us who are self coached, for whatever reason, have a unique "school of pool" perspective. Question everything you do from the standpoint of functional intent and it will allow you to develop the game that is relevant to you.
  
Reply With Quote
Reply
Page 2 of 2 12

Thread Tools
Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump



Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.9
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.