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dr_dave
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06-13-2019, 05:55 AM

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Here's another:

Gary Wilson elevating the mechanical bridge (rest) with his hand

I don't know why a snooker player would resort to this when they have all of those awesome high and long-reach spider rests. Dose anybody know why he chose to do this?
All the more impressive because he is playing the world #1 Mark Selby and if he misses the shot he loses the frame. This was in the 2019 World Championship and Wilson beat Selby in the match 13-10. Here's a link to the full match: https://youtu.be/v3SLEdaEGGc?t=8975 (2:30:00 time for the bridge shot)
Thanks for the link to the full-match video. I've updated my link above and in the YouTube video description.

Do you or others know why he would chose to do this when he has convenient access to those cool snooker spider and extended "rests?"
Is it just because they don't want to bother to pick up a better rest instead?

Or do they just trust this technique enough to not bother with a better rest?

Do some of the snooker players out there know of different reasons?

Thanks,
Dave
  
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Shuddy
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06-17-2019, 02:44 PM

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Originally Posted by dr_dave View Post
Is it just because they don't want to bother to pick up a better rest instead?

Or do they just trust this technique enough to not bother with a better rest?

Do some of the snooker players out there know of different reasons?

Thanks,
Dave
I learned this trick from an older snooker player about 20 years ago. He called it the “flying bridge”.

With the x bridge and a solid wooden bridge handle, it’s relatively stable. The x bridge head is also usually a lot smoother cueing through than the spider or swan/goose neck. You can also adjust the high of the rest with your hand and wrist. However, given that once you’ve got the knack of it, it’s relatively solid, it’s also convenient. The rests are kept just under both end cushions parallel to the rails. You bend down and grab them without even looking. The spider and swan necks are usually stored on rails under the table with the long bridges. You need to send down make sure you’re getting the right rest, slide it out, and put it back. Of course, pros have referees to do all that for them if they want, but it still takes more time.

Just some ideas.
  
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06-17-2019, 04:28 PM

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Originally Posted by Shuddy View Post
I learned this trick from an older snooker player about 20 years ago. He called it the “flying bridge”.

With the x bridge and a solid wooden bridge handle, it’s relatively stable. The x bridge head is also usually a lot smoother cueing through than the spider or swan/goose neck. You can also adjust the high of the rest with your hand and wrist. However, given that once you’ve got the knack of it, it’s relatively solid, it’s also convenient. The rests are kept just under both end cushions parallel to the rails. You bend down and grab them without even looking. The spider and swan necks are usually stored on rails under the table with the long bridges. You need to send down make sure you’re getting the right rest, slide it out, and put it back. Of course, pros have referees to do all that for them if they want, but it still takes more time.

Just some ideas.
Thanks for the info.

Sounds reasonable to me,
Dave
  
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