Old
  (#16)
skipbales
AzB Silver Member
skipbales has a reputation beyond reputeskipbales has a reputation beyond reputeskipbales has a reputation beyond reputeskipbales has a reputation beyond reputeskipbales has a reputation beyond reputeskipbales has a reputation beyond reputeskipbales has a reputation beyond reputeskipbales has a reputation beyond reputeskipbales has a reputation beyond reputeskipbales has a reputation beyond reputeskipbales has a reputation beyond repute
 
Status: Offline
Posts: 541
vCash: 500
iTrader: 0 / 0%
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Globe AZ
   
10-22-2019, 12:55 PM

If you notice the replies most people think in terms of make the shot, get shape for another shot that sets you up for shape to the 3rd ball. Mostly it is at least a 3 ball plan. Another way to view the table is to identify problem areas, have a plan to solve one problem first and see how that goes. If things roll well you develop a plan to continue. If you don't have a path to a run you play safe. Every part of the plan is based on outcomes, one shot at a time. Even players who say they don't do this actually do. All you have to do is watch them play. They don't simply go from ball to ball without looking around. They look at other options after every shot. It is just natural. You see them bend over and sight down a ball to see if it clears, etc. They are looking to see if they got lucky on a hard position ball and if they didn't they continue with the plan they started with. But if they got that crazy between two balls perfect unexpected shot at a problem ball, all bets are off and they go a totally different direction. I just think it is smart to realize this and actually take it into consideration when I plan my run out. either or planning.
  
Reply With Quote

Old
  (#17)
BC21
Poolology

BC21 has a reputation beyond reputeBC21 has a reputation beyond reputeBC21 has a reputation beyond reputeBC21 has a reputation beyond reputeBC21 has a reputation beyond reputeBC21 has a reputation beyond reputeBC21 has a reputation beyond reputeBC21 has a reputation beyond reputeBC21 has a reputation beyond reputeBC21 has a reputation beyond reputeBC21 has a reputation beyond repute
 
BC21's Avatar
 
Status: Offline
Posts: 3,256
vCash: 500
iTrader: 2 / 100%
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: West Virginia
   
10-22-2019, 01:12 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by skipbales View Post
We have a lady player in our league who is a great shot maker but clueless about position to the point it is maddening. Given 7 open balls she will run them if she happens on a clear shot each time. But she is much more likely to roll behind an opponent's ball and totally hook herself towards the end of her run. Even simply rolling forward a few inches or drawing back a little escapes her. She makes a great shot, stops the cue ball then has to kick at her remaining ball(s). It is painful to watch.
I understand completely. I know a couple guys locally who play that way. Here's the funny thing though.... If they were to start trying to move the cb better, try to get position on the next shot, they'd find themselves missing more shots. It takes a combination of acquired skills and knowledge to pocket balls AND play position. One without the other usually makes for a losing record. And these skills require practice to learn and experience to polish it all up.


POOLOLOGY
YouTube
Brian Crist
  
Reply With Quote
Old
  (#18)
skipbales
AzB Silver Member
skipbales has a reputation beyond reputeskipbales has a reputation beyond reputeskipbales has a reputation beyond reputeskipbales has a reputation beyond reputeskipbales has a reputation beyond reputeskipbales has a reputation beyond reputeskipbales has a reputation beyond reputeskipbales has a reputation beyond reputeskipbales has a reputation beyond reputeskipbales has a reputation beyond reputeskipbales has a reputation beyond repute
 
Status: Offline
Posts: 541
vCash: 500
iTrader: 0 / 0%
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Globe AZ
   
10-22-2019, 01:45 PM

lol. Yes. I watched a video of Tor Lowry working with a student who kept missing a pretty basic shot. Tor told him "you could make that shot 50 time in a row if you didn't have to think about where the cue ball was going". I try to always have a target for my cue ball to help with that. It is still easier in practice then a tournament though.
  
Reply With Quote
Old
  (#19)
FranCrimi
AzB Silver Member
FranCrimi has a reputation beyond reputeFranCrimi has a reputation beyond reputeFranCrimi has a reputation beyond reputeFranCrimi has a reputation beyond reputeFranCrimi has a reputation beyond reputeFranCrimi has a reputation beyond reputeFranCrimi has a reputation beyond reputeFranCrimi has a reputation beyond reputeFranCrimi has a reputation beyond reputeFranCrimi has a reputation beyond reputeFranCrimi has a reputation beyond repute
 
Status: Offline
Posts: 3,752
vCash: 500
iTrader: 0 / 0%
Join Date: Dec 2010
   
10-22-2019, 04:08 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by BC21 View Post
.....A great shot maker with poor position skills/knowledge would simply shoot....
I think we should seriously rethink the whole 'great shot-maker poor position player' thing. It's almost an oxymoron. You almost can't be a great shot-maker and a poor position player. There may be a brief cross-over period but it's very brief.

Most players think they're decent shot-makers, but they're not. Their poor position skills reflect that. Only when you can pocket balls with cue ball spin can you start to think about position play; and by then you're already doing it.

You only have a certain amount of time? Then practice making every shot on the table.

Last edited by FranCrimi; 10-22-2019 at 04:18 PM.
  
Reply With Quote
Old
  (#20)
Bob Jewett
Northern California

Bob Jewett has a reputation beyond reputeBob Jewett has a reputation beyond reputeBob Jewett has a reputation beyond reputeBob Jewett has a reputation beyond reputeBob Jewett has a reputation beyond reputeBob Jewett has a reputation beyond reputeBob Jewett has a reputation beyond reputeBob Jewett has a reputation beyond reputeBob Jewett has a reputation beyond reputeBob Jewett has a reputation beyond reputeBob Jewett has a reputation beyond repute
 
Status: Offline
Posts: 16,934
vCash: 1700
iTrader: 12 / 100%
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Berkeley, CA
   
10-22-2019, 05:11 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by FranCrimi View Post
I think we should seriously rethink the whole 'great shot-maker poor position player' thing. It's almost an oxymoron. You almost can't be a great shot-maker and a poor position player....
I had one student who overall was an APA 5. He had been playing for a long time. He could make shots that stronger players would not attempt. He did not play position and was not interested in playing position. If a soft shot was guaranteed to get good position, he would hit it with medium speed and shoot the resulting 75-degree cut or a bank. I briefly got him to play a few position shots and he kind of agreed that was useful, but the next week in league he was back to the style he felt comfortable with -- shoot and then look around for another shot.

It is not common but it is quite an eye-opener when you see such a person. I think he may have originally learned snooker which might explain hit potting ability and disdain for making the next shot easier.


Bob Jewett
SF Billiard Academy
  
Reply With Quote
Old
  (#21)
Patrick Johnson
Fish of the Day
Patrick Johnson has a reputation beyond reputePatrick Johnson has a reputation beyond reputePatrick Johnson has a reputation beyond reputePatrick Johnson has a reputation beyond reputePatrick Johnson has a reputation beyond reputePatrick Johnson has a reputation beyond reputePatrick Johnson has a reputation beyond reputePatrick Johnson has a reputation beyond reputePatrick Johnson has a reputation beyond reputePatrick Johnson has a reputation beyond reputePatrick Johnson has a reputation beyond repute
 
Patrick Johnson's Avatar
 
Status: Offline
Posts: 20,516
vCash: 1700
iTrader: 0 / 0%
Join Date: Jun 2007
   
10-22-2019, 07:17 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Jewett View Post
I had one student who overall was an APA 5. He had been playing for a long time. He could make shots that stronger players would not attempt. He did not play position and was not interested in playing position. If a soft shot was guaranteed to get good position, he would hit it with medium speed and shoot the resulting 75-degree cut or a bank. I briefly got him to play a few position shots and he kind of agreed that was useful, but the next week in league he was back to the style he felt comfortable with -- shoot and then look around for another shot.

It is not common but it is quite an eye-opener when you see such a person. I think he may have originally learned snooker which might explain hit potting ability and disdain for making the next shot easier.
That would take all the fun out of the game. To me making shots is an enjoyable challenge, but mostly a prerequisite to the art and fun of controlling the cue ball.

pj
chgo
  
Reply With Quote
Old
  (#22)
BC21
Poolology

BC21 has a reputation beyond reputeBC21 has a reputation beyond reputeBC21 has a reputation beyond reputeBC21 has a reputation beyond reputeBC21 has a reputation beyond reputeBC21 has a reputation beyond reputeBC21 has a reputation beyond reputeBC21 has a reputation beyond reputeBC21 has a reputation beyond reputeBC21 has a reputation beyond reputeBC21 has a reputation beyond repute
 
BC21's Avatar
 
Status: Offline
Posts: 3,256
vCash: 500
iTrader: 2 / 100%
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: West Virginia
   
10-22-2019, 09:03 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by FranCrimi View Post
I think we should seriously rethink the whole 'great shot-maker poor position player' thing. It's almost an oxymoron. You almost can't be a great shot-maker and a poor position player. There may be a brief cross-over period but it's very brief.

Most players think they're decent shot-makers, but they're not. Their poor position skills reflect that. Only when you can pocket balls with cue ball spin can you start to think about position play; and by then you're already doing it.

You only have a certain amount of time? Then practice making every shot on the table.
It's more common than you think (in bold). Seriously.

I have been a witness to these types of players for many many years. Maybe in a big city where there are several instructors and thousands of pool players you just don't get to see it. But go to ANY small town where there are zero poolhalls and zero instructors within a 2 hour drive. The kind of place where nobody knows what a Diamond table is, like a WV or KY or PA coal mining town, where all there is to do is drink beer and play pool at the only bar in town. Here you will find a player that consistently pockets rediculous shots due to years of playing 8ball on Valley barboxes. He is a great shot maker because that's how he learned, by firing at every shot he gets, regardless of difficulty, and he's had years to perfect it. Position play takes a back seat, because he knows as long as he can see the ob he can make the shot.


POOLOLOGY
YouTube
Brian Crist
  
Reply With Quote
Old
  (#23)
BC21
Poolology

BC21 has a reputation beyond reputeBC21 has a reputation beyond reputeBC21 has a reputation beyond reputeBC21 has a reputation beyond reputeBC21 has a reputation beyond reputeBC21 has a reputation beyond reputeBC21 has a reputation beyond reputeBC21 has a reputation beyond reputeBC21 has a reputation beyond reputeBC21 has a reputation beyond reputeBC21 has a reputation beyond repute
 
BC21's Avatar
 
Status: Offline
Posts: 3,256
vCash: 500
iTrader: 2 / 100%
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: West Virginia
   
10-22-2019, 09:15 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Jewett View Post
I had one student who overall was an APA 5. He had been playing for a long time. He could make shots that stronger players would not attempt. He did not play position and was not interested in playing position. If a soft shot was guaranteed to get good position, he would hit it with medium speed and shoot the resulting 75-degree cut or a bank. I briefly got him to play a few position shots and he kind of agreed that was useful, but the next week in league he was back to the style he felt comfortable with -- shoot and then look around for another shot.

It is not common but it is quite an eye-opener when you see such a person. I think he may have originally learned snooker which might explain hit potting ability and disdain for making the next shot easier.
Actually, outside of a poolhall environment, or a big league, or an area where half the players have access to private lessons, it is very common to run across these types of players. They are not serious players, but weekend warriors that have shot thousands of balls with no regard or knowledge of playing position. And they've developed excellent shot-making skills because they had to.

Here in WV it is not uncommon to find such players. They're everywhere. And since BCA leagues started becoming more popular, these players are coming out of the woods more often


POOLOLOGY
YouTube
Brian Crist
  
Reply With Quote
Old
  (#24)
BC21
Poolology

BC21 has a reputation beyond reputeBC21 has a reputation beyond reputeBC21 has a reputation beyond reputeBC21 has a reputation beyond reputeBC21 has a reputation beyond reputeBC21 has a reputation beyond reputeBC21 has a reputation beyond reputeBC21 has a reputation beyond reputeBC21 has a reputation beyond reputeBC21 has a reputation beyond reputeBC21 has a reputation beyond repute
 
BC21's Avatar
 
Status: Offline
Posts: 3,256
vCash: 500
iTrader: 2 / 100%
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: West Virginia
   
10-23-2019, 05:31 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Patrick Johnson View Post
That would take all the fun out of the game. To me making shots is an enjoyable challenge, but mostly a prerequisite to the art and fun of controlling the cue ball.

pj
chgo
I have a good friend who for years never played ball in hand rules. I first met him in a bar room 8ball tournament. He was an incredible shot maker (still is) and only cared about getting a shot, any shot. He would play the most unbelievable upside down runouts quite often. To him, and to me before ball in hand rules became the norm, the "art and fun" of playing was directly related to how well you could pocket balls.

Anyway, he lives about 40min out of Charleston, and years later he started coming to the poolroom here. He killed in ring games, where the old-school honest effort rules apply, like old bar room 8ball rules -- no safeties, no defense, just 100% ballzout creative offense on every shot. But he struggled in tournaments where other players were playing a more strategic game, unlike old bar room 8ball tournaments.

He does much better now, having incorporated better position and safety play, but there was definitely a learning curve where he found himself missing shots that he had always made before adding more position play to his game. He still occassionally shoots a very low percentage (wild) shot instead of playing an easy lockup safety, but that's because he's got the confidence of knowing he's going to make the ball and run out.


POOLOLOGY
YouTube
Brian Crist
  
Reply With Quote
Old
  (#25)
skipbales
AzB Silver Member
skipbales has a reputation beyond reputeskipbales has a reputation beyond reputeskipbales has a reputation beyond reputeskipbales has a reputation beyond reputeskipbales has a reputation beyond reputeskipbales has a reputation beyond reputeskipbales has a reputation beyond reputeskipbales has a reputation beyond reputeskipbales has a reputation beyond reputeskipbales has a reputation beyond reputeskipbales has a reputation beyond repute
 
Status: Offline
Posts: 541
vCash: 500
iTrader: 0 / 0%
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Globe AZ
   
10-23-2019, 06:19 AM

As is common here, the subject has drifted, which is fun too but I would like to drag it back to my original question for just a bit.

Everyone agrees that making the ball is important and doing ball pocketing drills helps with that. Most also agree getting position is important so having a target for the cue ball in your ball pocketing drill is important. Most also agree that things like getting on the correct side of the ball, using rails to control speed and coming into the line of the shot are all valuable techniques to make getting position easier. These considerations are the first step in the thinking part of the game, choosing shot options to make position easier. Most also feel like at least considering what you leave your opponent if you miss is also helpful.

That brings us to my topic. To plan a full table runout, or at least 3-4 balls ahead and plan to stick to it, knowing if you get bad position your run is probably over, but attributing that to a lack of skill and so you work on your shot making and position play. vs. Understanding you are likely to make some mistakes in position and trying to plan for that by considering alternate shots if you are long or shot, hit a ball unexpectedly, and so forth.

This is where some very good instructors disagree. One is so convinced you can't attain a high level he teaches shooting every shot based on a bad leave in case you miss. I rule this one out entirely. This gets you to a low intermediate level and is no fun to even play.

But the two major ones are:
1. Practice all the above and strive to get so good you can almost always run the patterns you predict to begin with. If you can't you just need to practice more to be more consistent. You never think of an alternate pattern or shot until you fail at what you are trying to do.
2. You understand your skill level and believe full table run out perfection of a predetermined run out is not realistic for almost anyone, so you don't think that way. Instead you see that pattern and maybe other possible patterns and go for shots and position on more than one ball , or more than one pocket at a time. You pick that desired landing area and a specific spot in it but it is a landing area with a as many other possible shots as you can, not necessarily the best landing area for your predesigned pattern.

Example:
Player 1: To get shape 3 balls ahead a player goes for a shot on the 3 ball into a side pocket to get on the 7 ball, etc. But if the player rolls long it ruins the entire plan. Rolling long is bad play and is corrected by practice. Better speed control is necessary.

Player 2: looks at the same layout with different eyes. He/she says I will shoot the 3 ball in the corner and if I am short I will shoot the 4 but if long I will still have a shot at the 6. So the pattern is not so set. It is less thinking 3-4 or even 8 balls ahead and more a matter of more options on the next shot then working your way through problems based on options that present themselves based on where you skill level takes you.

I think the philosophical difference is a disagreement on the difficulty of developing a skill set that can consistently make 8 preselected shots. 1. Says it is attainable and more practice gets you there. 2. Say no one (or at least almost no one) ever gets there and it is not the goal. The goal is to develop those skills and apply them as opportunity presents itself so playing for position that creates the most possible options is a more practical approach and a faster way to improve.

I hope I was clear, I apologize I am so wordy. I was looking to see who agrees with concelpt 1 vs 2.

Last edited by skipbales; 10-23-2019 at 06:37 AM.
  
Reply With Quote
Old
  (#26)
bbb
AzB Silver Member

bbb has a reputation beyond reputebbb has a reputation beyond reputebbb has a reputation beyond reputebbb has a reputation beyond reputebbb has a reputation beyond reputebbb has a reputation beyond reputebbb has a reputation beyond reputebbb has a reputation beyond reputebbb has a reputation beyond reputebbb has a reputation beyond reputebbb has a reputation beyond repute
 
Status: Offline
Posts: 6,857
vCash: 1700
iTrader: 39 / 100%
Blog Entries: 1
Join Date: Mar 2008
   
10-23-2019, 07:17 AM

I am not an instructor but I would go with your number one
When that fails time to make a new plan
However
When assessing the layout you will know where being on the wrong side of the ball is to prevent you on getting to the next ball
So you know you donít want to go there
You see the ball has two open pockets the side and corner
You can get shape to the next ball shooting in either pocket
I still would play for a consistent shape to one or the other pocket
Because trying to play shape for both targets could put you on the 50 yard line as far is shot difficulty for both
Jmho
  
Reply With Quote
Old
  (#27)
BilliardsAbout
BondFanEvents.com
BilliardsAbout has a reputation beyond reputeBilliardsAbout has a reputation beyond reputeBilliardsAbout has a reputation beyond reputeBilliardsAbout has a reputation beyond reputeBilliardsAbout has a reputation beyond reputeBilliardsAbout has a reputation beyond reputeBilliardsAbout has a reputation beyond reputeBilliardsAbout has a reputation beyond reputeBilliardsAbout has a reputation beyond reputeBilliardsAbout has a reputation beyond reputeBilliardsAbout has a reputation beyond repute
 
BilliardsAbout's Avatar
 
Status: Offline
Posts: 1,469
vCash: 500
iTrader: 0 / 0%
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Gainesville, FL
   
10-23-2019, 07:30 AM

I tend to say, "Don't care where the object ball goes, let's talk cue ball," however, that's for better players who make slight misses, where correct cue ball speed will adjust for both o.b. throw and c.b. position.

Bangers who make a lot of shots need to understand a soft touch, but as stated above, intermediates may pick up position play fast.

The cliche is true at lower levels, though, that the position player beats the shot artist over time, since 1) the shot maker attempts fewer safeties 2) the shot maker showoff forgets to chalk or does something else dumb 3) the "but I can make any cut!" intermediate fails to understand 80% isn't 100% of cuts.


-- Matt Sherman

Guide to Pool and Billiards, About.com
Instruction Staff, InsidePool Magazine
Author, book/DVD combo, Picture Yourself Shooting Pool
  
Reply With Quote
Old
  (#28)
BC21
Poolology

BC21 has a reputation beyond reputeBC21 has a reputation beyond reputeBC21 has a reputation beyond reputeBC21 has a reputation beyond reputeBC21 has a reputation beyond reputeBC21 has a reputation beyond reputeBC21 has a reputation beyond reputeBC21 has a reputation beyond reputeBC21 has a reputation beyond reputeBC21 has a reputation beyond reputeBC21 has a reputation beyond repute
 
BC21's Avatar
 
Status: Offline
Posts: 3,256
vCash: 500
iTrader: 2 / 100%
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: West Virginia
   
10-23-2019, 08:33 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by skipbales View Post
.....

But the two major ones are:

1. Practice all the above and strive to get so good you can almost always run the patterns you predict to begin with. If you can't you just need to practice more to be more consistent. You never think of an alternate pattern or shot until you fail at what you are trying to do.

2. You understand your skill level and believe full table run out perfection of a predetermined run out is not realistic for almost anyone, so you don't think that way. Instead you see that pattern and maybe other possible patterns and go for shots and position on more than one ball , or more than one pocket at a time. You pick that desired landing area and a specific spot in it but it is a landing area with a as many other possible shots as you can, not necessarily the best landing area for your predesigned pattern.
A mixture of both.

Most runouts involve key shots and potential trouble shots that you must be able to recognize and deal with. Your plan or pattern must have plasticity, meaning you can adapt to any "what if" situations along the way.

Every now and then a rack opens up so nicely that the potential for trouble is basically nonexistent. A buddy of mine calls these "set racks" because the pattern is so obvious that you'd really have to fall apart in order not to get out -- as if someone set the rack up purposely to make it an easy out. This is of course assuming you can at least play decent position, not perfect but just decent general shape.

Most racks, however, will contain potential trouble, and we have to recognize this and plan accordingly. The plan might involve a key shot that requires precise position, or it might involve playing a case shot or playing position for multiple options that will allow the plan to unfold more smoothly. Recognizing key balls and potential pitfalls comes with experience. It's more of an acquired knowledge than a skill that needs practiced. Watching pros/great players and getting lessons from good instructors can really help with acquiring that specific knowledge. It doesn't mean you'll always be able to deal with potential trouble, but recognizing it at least gives you opportunity to adapt if you can.


POOLOLOGY
YouTube
Brian Crist

Last edited by BC21; 10-23-2019 at 09:40 AM.
  
Reply With Quote
Old
  (#29)
skipbales
AzB Silver Member
skipbales has a reputation beyond reputeskipbales has a reputation beyond reputeskipbales has a reputation beyond reputeskipbales has a reputation beyond reputeskipbales has a reputation beyond reputeskipbales has a reputation beyond reputeskipbales has a reputation beyond reputeskipbales has a reputation beyond reputeskipbales has a reputation beyond reputeskipbales has a reputation beyond reputeskipbales has a reputation beyond repute
 
Status: Offline
Posts: 541
vCash: 500
iTrader: 0 / 0%
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Globe AZ
   
10-23-2019, 09:05 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by bbb View Post
I am not an instructor but I would go with your number one

Because trying to play shape for both targets could put you on the 50 yard line as far is shot difficulty for both
Jmho
Not so much going for both pockets, the concept is more:

For purposes of my planned runout I go for shape for the side pocket, knowing if I mess up there is no other possible shot for me. But the side pocket position leads me to the easiest path for my planned runout so I need to set up for the side. If I don't get good position on the side pocket it is because my skill level is too low and the fastest way to improve my overall game is to improve my skill level.

vs. If I go for position into the corner it doesn't work perfectly with my pre designed plan (or maybe don't even have a pre designed plan) and I am off, even by a lot, I will still have 3 other balls I can shoot and I am very likely to get good on at least one of them but that would mean not following the run out pattern I designed to begin with. It would mean seeing other ways to run out. This thinking is, the fastest way to improve my game is to make choices with more options, and work on seeing the options better, to work with my skill level as it is and improve my skill level slowly as I can over time.

Last edited by skipbales; 10-23-2019 at 09:08 AM.
  
Reply With Quote
Old
  (#30)
bbb
AzB Silver Member

bbb has a reputation beyond reputebbb has a reputation beyond reputebbb has a reputation beyond reputebbb has a reputation beyond reputebbb has a reputation beyond reputebbb has a reputation beyond reputebbb has a reputation beyond reputebbb has a reputation beyond reputebbb has a reputation beyond reputebbb has a reputation beyond reputebbb has a reputation beyond repute
 
Status: Offline
Posts: 6,857
vCash: 1700
iTrader: 39 / 100%
Blog Entries: 1
Join Date: Mar 2008
   
10-23-2019, 09:45 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by skipbales View Post
Not so much going for both pockets, the concept is more:

For purposes of my planned runout I go for shape for the side pocket, knowing if I mess up there is no other possible shot for me. But the side pocket position leads me to the easiest path for my planned runout so I need to set up for the side. If I don't get good position on the side pocket it is because my skill level is too low and the fastest way to improve my overall game is to improve my skill level.

vs. If I go for position into the corner it doesn't work perfectly with my pre designed plan (or maybe don't even have a pre designed plan) and I am off, even by a lot, I will still have 3 other balls I can shoot and I am very likely to get good on at least one of them but that would mean not following the run out pattern I designed to begin with. It would mean seeing other ways to run out. This thinking is, the fastest way to improve my game is to make choices with more options, and work on seeing the options better, to work with my skill level as it is and improve my skill level slowly as I can over time.
I think your second concept is geared more for street pool eight ball or one pocket
and not rotation games
Examples are an insurance ball when breaking up a cluster
And trying to stay above the balls when running balls in one pocket
I still think especially with limited time to practice working on improving your skill level
will get you farther in the long term picture
Even though you may have a few more losses along the way
Jmho
Icbw
I am not an instructor
  
Reply With Quote
Reply
Page 2 of 5 12 34 Last »

Thread Tools
Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump



Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.9
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2019 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.