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Scott Lee
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12-04-2019, 01:21 PM

Some of those instructors know exactly what they're talking about...and some other don't. There are many factors that can and do influence the accuracy and performance of your stroke process. The best instructors (certified or not) know how to communicate effectively with their students, and use video analysis to help the student "see" their issues. In your lingo, 'cosmetic' issues can have serious detriments to repeatability as well.

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Originally Posted by BC21 View Post

Some instructors will want you to conform to whatever they've been certified to teach, or whatever they prefer or favor. But I think the better ones have enough good judgment not to mess with things that really have very little impact on performance. As long as the stroke is on and the cue contacts the cb accurately, it's not problematic, it's cosmetic. Unless, of course, during the forward stroke (before the tip strikes the cb) you feel the cue slipping, then it's problematic and needs corrected.


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Patrick Johnson
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12-04-2019, 03:45 PM

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Originally Posted by MagicMcNamara View Post
I will say that is the most comfortable way for me. Now that i've been trying to tighten the grip up it really feels like I am death gripping the cue. It's going off line, i'm getting no action on the cueball, my accuracy is terrible and I feel like im punching the cueball. Can't be right. There has to be some in between here that i'm not able to understand how to apply to my grip.
I wrap all my fingers loosely around the cue, but my thumb and forefinger are the only ones gripping it. The other fingers open and close slightly with the back and forth strokes (as the cue pivots up and down in my thumb/forefinger grip) and are just there to keep my hand in that relaxed "parallel" position which allows the most naturally straight stroke at all speeds (for me).

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BC21
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12-04-2019, 06:33 PM

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Originally Posted by MagicMcNamara View Post
....... It's the most confusing fundamental for me, it's very difficult to change right now without physical assistance
When a musician is working on a certain technique, or when a golfer is working on a backswing, they do it with very slow, deliberate conscious control. They have to learn it this way whether they are worldclass performers or beginners. Learning or developing something new, or correcting/changing something you've already developed, takes deliberate thought and deliberate muscle control at first, over and over and over until the movements no longer feel awkward and you're no longer thinking about it because you're just doing it. And you're exactly right -- it's very difficult to do!

But if you have no resources, like a local Scott Lee or other good instructor, then you are limited on options. You either have to keep working on it with very deliberate/conscious efforts until you start feeling more comfortable with a slightly firmer grip, or you have to accept that you're likely going to keep doing what you're doing.


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FranCrimi
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12-07-2019, 02:23 PM

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Originally Posted by MagicMcNamara View Post
Here is the video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qYlcTS-6l2k&t=182s

The play isn't stellar but you can definitely see what i'm doing with my grip. The first rack you can see how my pinky has tension in it and also that I let my cue slide through my hand on every shot.
You're opening your fingers on the way back and then grabbing the cue on the way forward. It's okay to feel your hand as your arm swings but you're prioritizing your hand instead of your arm which is really what swings the cue. Focus more on your arm movement and just let your hand go along for the ride.
  
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12-08-2019, 02:04 PM

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Originally Posted by FranCrimi View Post
You're opening your fingers on the way back and then grabbing the cue on the way forward. It's okay to feel your hand as your arm swings but you're prioritizing your hand instead of your arm which is really what swings the cue. Focus more on your arm movement and just let your hand go along for the ride.
This is great advice thx
  
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12-08-2019, 08:03 PM

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Originally Posted by FranCrimi View Post
You're opening your fingers on the way back and then grabbing the cue on the way forward. It's okay to feel your hand as your arm swings but you're prioritizing your hand instead of your arm which is really what swings the cue. Focus more on your arm movement and just let your hand go along for the ride.
"Prioritizing your hand instead of your arm" is an excellent way to put it.

I think this may be the single most underrated aspect of the stroke. Everybody simply says something like "cradle the cue and keep the wrist relaxed" or something like that, but it deserves a lot more attention. When I'm not shooting the way I should be this is usually the culprit.


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One Pocket John
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12-09-2019, 04:19 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by FranCrimi View Post
You're opening your fingers on the way back and then grabbing the cue on the way forward. It's okay to feel your hand as your arm swings but you're prioritizing your hand instead of your arm which is really what swings the cue. Focus more on your arm movement and just let your hand go along for the ride.
Going on 10 years of reading your posts. This is great advise.

Thanks and Happy Holidays Fran.

John


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