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Neil
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11-17-2014, 07:18 AM

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Originally Posted by Pidge View Post
Nobody does. Not 100% of the time anyway. Even if the tip moves back and forward just a few mm, its still warm up strokes. I can't think of benefits from not using them.
The red circle on a red circle cue ball is 3mm. You are claiming that a movement even less than that distance is a warm up stroke. I think you are being a little pedantic on what constitutes a warm up stroke. While everyone else is saying he took no warm up strokes, there you are saying "oh, he moved a mm, he takes warm up strokes".
  
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11-17-2014, 07:51 AM

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Originally Posted by nobcitypool View Post
I think pool players should learn from professional golfers. The overwhelming majority go through the exact pre shot routine regardless of the shot or circumstances. I don't think the important point is whether or not warm up strokes are used or not, rather, are they employing a consistent, repeatable pre shot routine?
Consistency should be the primary goal with your routine. I used to shoot with absolutely no practice strokes for years, but recently I have found that they can provide more rhythm to my game.
  
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11-17-2014, 08:05 AM

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Originally Posted by Neil View Post
The red circle on a red circle cue ball is 3mm. You are claiming that a movement even less than that distance is a warm up stroke. I think you are being a little pedantic on what constitutes a warm up stroke. While everyone else is saying he took no warm up strokes, there you are saying "oh, he moved a mm, he takes warm up strokes".
Perhaps I was being a little pedantic, ill admit that. But I think the term warm up stroke is the wrong phrase. Or maybe it isn't. Perhaps people refer to warm up strokes as just that, strokes to loosen the arm up. People may see practice strokes as strokes that will resemble their final stroke. People might think feathering the CB is the little 3mm or so movements in the address position. The majority of pros use a feathering technique, some a combination of some or all 3. But I took the thread title to mean zero movement.
  
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Neil
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11-17-2014, 08:12 AM

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Originally Posted by Pidge View Post
Perhaps I was being a little pedantic, ill admit that. But I think the term warm up stroke is the wrong phrase. Or maybe it isn't. Perhaps people refer to warm up strokes as just that, strokes to loosen the arm up. People may see practice strokes as strokes that will resemble their final stroke. People might think feathering the CB is the little 3mm or so movements in the address position. The majority of pros use a feathering technique, some a combination of some or all 3. But I took the thread title to mean zero movement.
I could be out in left field on this, but I think most of those feathering strokes are nothing more than the fact that some people just can't be still. They have to have something moving, even a tiny amount, or they feel like they aren't doing anything.
  
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11-17-2014, 08:39 AM

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Originally Posted by Neil View Post
I could be out in left field on this, but I think most of those feathering strokes are nothing more than the fact that some people just can't be still. They have to have something moving, even a tiny amount, or they feel like they aren't doing anything.
Perhaps. I tend to see feathering as a way to stop yourself from pausing too long. I know if I pause for too long, my backstroke is far to long and almost overcompensates for not moving. I've spoken to a few players in snooker over the years who just feathered the cue ball no matter what shot was at hand and they said the feathers were just a way to pinpoint exactly where they were to strike the cue ball.

A lot of darts pros use a feathering technique also. It allows them to make fine aiming adjustments and pinpoint the trajectory of the dart. I think its the same in pool - players do it to judge the trajectory of the cue through the CB. Its far easier to judge and feel the angle of approach and fine tune the aim when little feathers are used compared to no movement at all.
  
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11-17-2014, 08:56 AM

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Originally Posted by Pidge View Post
Perhaps. I tend to see feathering as a way to stop yourself from pausing too long. I know if I pause for too long, my backstroke is far to long and almost overcompensates for not moving. I've spoken to a few players in snooker over the years who just feathered the cue ball no matter what shot was at hand and they said the feathers were just a way to pinpoint exactly where they were to strike the cue ball.

A lot of darts pros use a feathering technique also. It allows them to make fine aiming adjustments and pinpoint the trajectory of the dart. I think its the same in pool - players do it to judge the trajectory of the cue through the CB. Its far easier to judge and feel the angle of approach and fine tune the aim when little feathers are used compared to no movement at all.
Feathering may be comparable to a golfers "waggle". I think the waggle may be an effort to get loose, a nervous habit or something copied from somebody else. Ray Floyd and Sergio Garcia come to mind.


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11-17-2014, 10:20 AM

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Originally Posted by nobcitypool View Post
Feathering may be comparable to a golfers "waggle". I think the waggle may be an effort to get loose, a nervous habit or something copied from somebody else. Ray Floyd and Sergio Garcia come to mind.
Batsmen in cricket and baseball have a waggle of the bat. There are too many sports that have something that relates to feathering that must be beneficial. Whether its to stop tension building up, a rhythm thing, pinpoint accuracy and so on.
  
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11-17-2014, 11:35 AM

there have been a few threads on the snooker forum on whether or not to feather. Some people (including coaches) mentioned that feathering might not work for everybody as it teaches students to stop the cue at the cue ball thus causing DECELERATION. On the contrary others say it's useful as it enables us to get the feeling what the final bakcswing is going to feel like. Just a point what I have read out. Regards.
  
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11-17-2014, 01:09 PM

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Originally Posted by pleforowicz View Post
there have been a few threads on the snooker forum on whether or not to feather. Some people (including coaches) mentioned that feathering might not work for everybody as it teaches students to stop the cue at the cue ball thus causing DECELERATION. On the contrary others say it's useful as it enables us to get the feeling what the final bakcswing is going to feel like. Just a point what I have read out. Regards.
If you have a pause at the back of your stroke its damn hard to decelerate on the front stroke. I've never heard of a snooker coach promoting not feathering. Most will say shorten the feathering strokes, but not stop them all together.
  
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11-18-2014, 02:19 AM

I always thought that it was quite easy to decelerate, as it is said to be caused by the tightening of the grip hand too early which appears to be a common problem. I am a follower of doing max 3 feathers as I think the more feathers you have the more opportunity for your body to move and more likely to make some adjustments. Peter Ebdon does handle it nicely, though. :O
  
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11-18-2014, 03:21 AM

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Originally Posted by pleforowicz View Post
I always thought that it was quite easy to decelerate, as it is said to be caused by the tightening of the grip hand too early which appears to be a common problem. I am a follower of doing max 3 feathers as I think the more feathers you have the more opportunity for your body to move and more likely to make some adjustments. Peter Ebdon does handle it nicely, though. :O
Yeah I'm a believer that there is such a thing as too much feathering. 3 is plenty, but some players like to take an age when down ala Ebdon.
  
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11-18-2014, 04:23 AM

You guys ever watch John Morra play?

Dude takes like 20 (obvious exaggeration) warm up strokes.
  
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11-18-2014, 04:55 AM

Guess I'm not getting it. I take avg. 5 practice strokes. The first 3 are not straight, 4th is pretty good, 5th is on. My back swing has nothing to do with fore swing speed. That decision was made while back. All these strokes are to get that tip where I want it. Not feeling the shot. That's already done too.

Side note:
I was once told by a National 3C Champion, if you find yourself out of stroke, try practicing without the practice strokes. I've never really given it much chance but I think he was saying, eliminate everything else including making shots, and concentrate only on this movement.
  
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11-18-2014, 05:19 AM

To me, the term no warmup stroke means no movement at all. Drop into position, set, and shoot.

The waggling and feathering you all are talking about are forms of warming up.
  
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11-18-2014, 08:42 AM

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Originally Posted by FranCrimi View Post
To me, the term no warmup stroke means no movement at all. Drop into position, set, and shoot.

The waggling and feathering you all are talking about are forms of warming up.
fran that was the intent of the thread to discuss
get down maybe adjust for aim and shoot
  
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