Vision not eyes....
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duckie
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Vision not eyes.... - 07-19-2019, 06:02 AM

Mohrt was onto something about how CTE makes one use their vision different. I believe this.

Not a lot is discussed about the different areas of your field of vision and how to use them.

I ride and at one time raced motorcycles. It does require you to use your vision differently than driving. The peripheral vision is critical in staying alive while riding. You must train yourself to see objects in your peripheral vision.

When you are mid pac in a starting grid of 25 race motorcycles all going for the same line in the first turn at the start, you canít be looking at anything in order to see everything going on around you going into that turn. Your central vision can not be fixed on anything cause the second you do, you loose whatís going on around you in your peripheral vision, not a good thing unless you need to avoided a down rider in front of you, then it all central vision.

Also, I was taught in marital arts not to look at your opponent, but to look past them cause this way you can see any movement they make whereas looking into their eyes you canít.

When Iím playing really well, my central vision is not on anything specific, but on a area of the table the allows my peripheral vision to see the pocket, OB, and CB all at once, the whole shot picture. Kinda how you learn to see those hidden 3D imagines.

By being able to see the whole shot picture, I found that it is easier to sense when Iím in the correct shooting position. Iíll switch to using my central vision for final checks before I stroke.

Iíve wondered if the steps in CTE somehow forces a player to use their peripheral vision more and not just rely on the central vision.

The eyes are just a sensory organ that passes light. Vision is another thing.
  
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Dan White
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07-19-2019, 06:27 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by duckie View Post
Mohrt was onto something about how CTE makes one use their vision different. I believe this.

Not a lot is discussed about the different areas of your field of vision and how to use them.

I ride and at one time raced motorcycles. It does require you to use your vision differently than driving. The peripheral vision is critical in staying alive while riding. You must train yourself to see objects in your peripheral vision.

When you are mid pac in a starting grid of 25 race motorcycles all going for the same line in the first turn at the start, you canít be looking at anything in order to see everything going on around you going into that turn. Your central vision can not be fixed on anything cause the second you do, you loose whatís going on around you in your peripheral vision, not a good thing unless you need to avoided a down rider in front of you, then it all central vision.

Also, I was taught in marital arts not to look at your opponent, but to look past them cause this way you can see any movement they make whereas looking into their eyes you canít.

When Iím playing really well, my central vision is not on anything specific, but on a area of the table the allows my peripheral vision to see the pocket, OB, and CB all at once, the whole shot picture. Kinda how you learn to see those hidden 3D imagines.

By being able to see the whole shot picture, I found that it is easier to sense when Iím in the correct shooting position. Iíll switch to using my central vision for final checks before I stroke.

Iíve wondered if the steps in CTE somehow forces a player to use their peripheral vision more and not just rely on the central vision.

The eyes are just a sensory organ that passes light. Vision is another thing.
In astronomy if you want to see a very, very faint object in a telescope lens you have to do what is called "averting your gaze." Instead of looking right at the object you should look to the side of it and your retina is better able to pick up the image that way. I don't recall the reason that works, but might have something to do with the optic nerve entering the retina.

I think CTE makes you use your vision differently simply because it forces you to be in a different position while shooting vs traditional aiming. IMO this has nothing to do with the supposed effectiveness. It's just a matter of doing the same thing over and over the same way and that can help.
  
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Patrick Johnson
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07-19-2019, 08:20 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by duckie View Post
By being able to see the whole shot picture, I found that it is easier to sense when I’m in the correct shooting position.
Me too. I purposely train myself to see all the elements of alignment at once: stick (including its movement), CB, OB, pocket - which, as you say, is easier when my vision isn't focused intently on any one piece of it. I also visually focus on specific pieces (like tip/ball placement or OB contact point) during the process, but the "comprehensive alignment picture" (while taking those specifics into account) is the most important one for me.

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