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Top 10 Pool and Billiard Myths Busted and Debunked
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dr_dave
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Exclamation Top 10 Pool and Billiard Myths Busted and Debunked - 07-16-2019, 10:20 AM

I just posted a new YouTube video that demonstrates and debunks the following Top 10 common pool and billiard myths and misconceptions:

1 - If you elevate the cue, you get more draw.
2 - A closed bridge is better for draw shots.
3 - Sidespin affects the path the CB takes off the OB.
4 - A swooping or swiping stroke can apply more sidespin.
5 - LD shafts allow you to put more spin on the ball.
6 - Throw is not important in pool.
7 - Spin transfer is not important in pool.
8 - More spin creates more SIT.
9 - The stroke “type” changes the shot action.
10 - Finding your “dominant eye” is important.

Check it out. Here it is:

NV J.25 – Top 10 Pool and Billiard Myths Busted and Debunked

It is part of my recent Top 10 series.

Enjoy,
Dave

Last edited by dr_dave; 07-16-2019 at 11:11 AM.
  
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Texas Carom Club
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07-16-2019, 10:24 AM

spin transfer is important in carom as you can see

https://youtu.be/Dnnod4tuQP8?t=213


3 cushion has killed carom
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07-16-2019, 10:25 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by dr_dave View Post
I just posted a new YouTube video that demonstrate and debunks the following Top 10 common pool and billiard myths and misconceptions:

1 - If you elevate the cue, you get more draw.
2 - A closed bridge is better for draw shots.
3 - Sidespin affects the path the CB takes off the OB.
4 - A swooping or swiping stroke can apply more sidespin.
5 - LD shafts allow you to put more spin on the ball.
6 - Throw is not important in pool.
7 - Spin transfer is not important in pool.
8 - More spin creates more SIT.
9 - The stroke “type” changes the shot action.
10 - Finding your “dominant” is important.

Check it out. Here it is:

NV J.25 – Top 10 Pool and Billiard Myths Busted and Debunked

It is part of my recent Top 10 series.

Enjoy,
Dave
I will have to check this out as I believe there are exceptions like "nip draw"???


A bull without horns is still dangerous.

Law of logical arguement-Anything is possible when you dont know what you are talking about.

  
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07-16-2019, 10:30 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Texas Carom Club View Post
spin transfer is important in carom as you can see

https://youtu.be/Dnnod4tuQP8?t=213
That's a good example. Thank you for posting it.

FYI, I have many other spin transfer examples here:

spin transfer resource page

Regards,
Dave
  
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07-16-2019, 10:31 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by alphadog View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by dr_dave View Post
I just posted a new YouTube video that demonstrates and debunks the following Top 10 common pool and billiard myths and misconceptions:

1 - If you elevate the cue, you get more draw.
2 - A closed bridge is better for draw shots.
3 - Sidespin affects the path the CB takes off the OB.
4 - A swooping or swiping stroke can apply more sidespin.
5 - LD shafts allow you to put more spin on the ball.
6 - Throw is not important in pool.
7 - Spin transfer is not important in pool.
8 - More spin creates more SIT.
9 - The stroke “type” changes the shot action.
10 - Finding your “dominant eye” is important.

Check it out. Here it is:

NV J.25 – Top 10 Pool and Billiard Myths Busted and Debunked

It is part of my recent Top 10 series.

Enjoy,
Dave
I will have to check this out as I believe there are exceptions like "nip draw"???
Please post your questions or disagreements after you have a chance to review the video.

Catch you later,
Dave

Last edited by dr_dave; 07-16-2019 at 11:11 AM.
  
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07-16-2019, 11:36 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by dr_dave View Post
Please post your questions or disagreements after you have a chance to review the video.

Catch you later,
Dave
I agree that all of these beliefs are wrong. Still, I watched the video and love the examples used to debunk it all. Excellent, as usual.


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07-16-2019, 11:52 AM

Good stuff here, Dave, and in general, I agree.

Where I am inclined to disagree is on #2 in which you suggest a closed bridge is not better for draw.

First, it is on a firm hit of the cue ball that one is most exposed to unintended sidespin on the cue ball. The closed bridge, in my experience, makes it much easier for all but a few to avoid unintended sidespin. As unintended sidespin causes a loss of stroke accuracy and also causes misses, managing this risk is very important.

To dismiss this point with the comment that your observation doesn't apply if one has stroke flaws is to sidestep reality. In my estimation, 99% of all people who play pool once a week or more have stroke flaws and 99% of them will have them for the remainder of their pool-playing lives.

While you may be right that an open bridge can, for elite cueists, be as effective as a closed bridge for draw, I contend that a closed bridge will add much greater consistency to one's draw for most players.

No myth here.
  
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07-16-2019, 12:01 PM

I get all of that except #2.
I assume you mean in an "all things being equal" sense, not in the instructor sense. That yes you can get the same draw with an open bridge, but its harder. Like climbing Everest with one leg, sure...you can do it...
  
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07-16-2019, 12:26 PM

Curious myself about #2 as I use an open bridge almost exclusively.
And when I need big draw, I prefer it, there's less friction.

Almost any example of power draw on youtube shows a closed bridge.

But every video of snooker shows it done with an open bridge,
and we know snooker requires lots of accuracy. So if closed bridge were necessary to prevent
accidental side and other problems, why wouldn't they do it?


On paper I see the logic of closed bridge... "oh sure, the little walls created by the
your fingers, prevent the cue from sliding sideways".

But does your cue really tend to slip sideways when you stroke?
Even an open bridge has a bit of a little "V" shape. Seems to me you'd almost have to work
to make the cue go sideways when your arm is swinging forward.
  
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07-16-2019, 12:27 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by BC21 View Post
I agree that all of these beliefs are wrong. Still, I watched the video and love the examples used to debunk it all. Excellent, as usual.
Thanks Brian. I'm glad people like this video, because it took a fair amount of work and time to produce.

Catch you later,
Dave
  
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07-16-2019, 12:32 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by sjm View Post
Good stuff here, Dave, and in general, I agree.
I'm glad to hear it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sjm View Post
Where I am inclined to disagree is on #2 in which you suggest a closed bridge is not better for draw.

First, it is on a firm hit of the cue ball that one is most exposed to unintended sidespin on the cue ball. The closed bridge, in my experience, makes it much easier for all but a few to avoid unintended sidespin. As unintended sidespin causes a loss of stroke accuracy and also causes misses, managing this risk is very important.

To dismiss this point with the comment that your observation doesn't apply if one has stroke flaws is to sidestep reality. In my estimation, 99% of all people who play pool once a week or more have stroke flaws and 99% of them will have them for the remainder of their pool-playing lives.

While you may be right that an open bridge can, for elite cueists, be as effective as a closed bridge for draw, I contend that a closed bridge will add much greater consistency to one's draw for most players.

No myth here.
Good points, but you do not need to be an "elite cueist" to use an open bridge effectively. And getting rid of some of the "stroke flaws" that might make a closed bridge more effective might also improve one's draw stroke.

For those interested in learning more, see:

draw technique advice

advantages of an open bridge

Regards,
Dave
  
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07-16-2019, 12:35 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by DecentShot View Post
I get all of that except #2.
I assume you mean in an "all things being equal" sense, not in the instructor sense. That yes you can get the same draw with an open bridge, but its harder. Like climbing Everest with one leg, sure...you can do it...
An open bridge actually has advantages. With a good stroke, there is no reason why a closed bridge would be better on a draw shot.

Regards,
Dave
  
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07-16-2019, 12:38 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by CreeDo View Post
,,, But every video of snooker shows it done with an open bridge, and we know snooker requires lots of accuracy. So if closed bridge were necessary to prevent accidental side and other problems, why wouldn't they do it? ,,,
I have just recently noticed that on power draw shots (and maybe other power shots?) some very good snooker players bend the cue down for the power stroke. Presumably they do this by torquing their grip hand to press the shaft onto the bridge. I have not seen this technique discussed in print. You need the right camera angle to see this, but sometimes they show from the back and along the line of the cue stick, more or less. Or maybe I'm seeing things.


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07-16-2019, 12:39 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by CreeDo View Post
Curious myself about #2 as I use an open bridge almost exclusively.
And when I need big draw, I prefer it, there's less friction.

Almost any example of power draw on youtube shows a closed bridge.

But every video of snooker shows it done with an open bridge,
and we know snooker requires lots of accuracy. So if closed bridge were necessary to prevent
accidental side and other problems, why wouldn't they do it?


On paper I see the logic of closed bridge... "oh sure, the little walls created by the
your fingers, prevent the cue from sliding sideways".

But does your cue really tend to slip sideways when you stroke?
Even an open bridge has a bit of a little "V" shape. Seems to me you'd almost have to work
to make the cue go sideways when your arm is swinging forward.
Excellent points. Thank you.

With a solid open bridge with a well-defined "V," I think the cue is actually more likely to stay straighter than with a closed bridge, especially with a "non-elite" player who might not have a very good closed bridge.

Regards,
Dave
  
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07-16-2019, 12:39 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by dr_dave View Post
An open bridge actually has advantages. With a good stroke, there is no reason why a closed bridge would be better on a draw shot.

Regards,
Dave
Ok Dave, Ill look into it.
  
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