Go Back   AzBilliards.com > Main Category > Main Forum
Reload this Page Stalking The Elusive Zone
Reply
Page 2 of 2 12
 
Share Thread Tools Rate Thread
Old
  (#16)
Imac007
AzB Silver Member
Imac007 has a reputation beyond reputeImac007 has a reputation beyond reputeImac007 has a reputation beyond reputeImac007 has a reputation beyond reputeImac007 has a reputation beyond reputeImac007 has a reputation beyond reputeImac007 has a reputation beyond reputeImac007 has a reputation beyond reputeImac007 has a reputation beyond reputeImac007 has a reputation beyond reputeImac007 has a reputation beyond repute
 
Status: Offline
Posts: 286
vCash: 500
iTrader: 0 / 0%
Blog Entries: 1
Join Date: Dec 2017
   
07-24-2019, 01:37 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by ShootingArts View Post
The no headphones thing is fairly common. It might be better to have an action as the trigger. Walking up to the table, holding the cue in a certain way. Since we want to find the zone before aiming we don't want to already be down on the shot to enter the zone. If a person wears a cap or glasses perhaps resetting one or the other as they go towards the table could be the trigger. With a pistol I always felt like it was reaching for it or contact with the butt since the draw was part of the competitions I was in.

Might sing a few lines or whistle a few notes as you approach the table. Trigger yourself into the zone and probably annoy your opponent as you did it over and over!

I was shooting pool one night when somebody fell in love with the song about another bowl of them good ol' butter beans. It isn't a bad song but fifteen or twenty times an hour for hours, it begin to grate on my nerves. Soon I was singing along, loudly! Very out of character for me and a friend was trying to get me to sing it again the next night. I had a hard time making him understand that was just my way of venting knowing I can't carry a tune in a bucket with a lid on it!

Anyway, I think an action trigger would be best in a pool environment or something you could go through mentally.

Hu
I agree. Sometimes we work too hard at it. When the idea of "quiet eye" was discovered as a behavior of better players, it was because getting focused on an exact target takes time. The player needs to get still, mentally and physically. The behavior was the natural result of the body’s inner knowing of what it needed. Getting a cue ball into position usually requires precise pocketing especially on closer shots. We all understand cheating the pocket to get an angle. A ball hit too fat and going to a rail will often have the wrong pace and angle compared to an imagined center pocket shot. Or a slight overcut can create more outside running english, less momentum loss and a huge pace overrun.

Maybe the thing that good players do, finding that target quietly (gazing), then finding the precision that goes with it are both a trigger and natural outcome, a slightly longer gaze, found in better players.

Simply put, find the target, then find the shot.

Letting the target be the trigger might be the best solution if it is used "to find the shot".

Last edited by Imac007; 07-24-2019 at 01:43 PM.
  
Reply With Quote

Old
  (#17)
logical
sarcasm while you wait
logical has a reputation beyond reputelogical has a reputation beyond reputelogical has a reputation beyond reputelogical has a reputation beyond reputelogical has a reputation beyond reputelogical has a reputation beyond reputelogical has a reputation beyond reputelogical has a reputation beyond reputelogical has a reputation beyond reputelogical has a reputation beyond reputelogical has a reputation beyond repute
 
logical's Avatar
 
Status: Offline
Posts: 1,832
vCash: 1700
iTrader: 2 / 100%
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Northern fringe of the Motor City suburbs
   
07-24-2019, 03:06 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Imac007 View Post
Michael Murphy is author to both "Golf in the Kingdom" and The Psychic Side of Sports.
I probably should have realized that or more likely I knew that at one time and forgot. I quit telling people that Golf in the Kingdom made me a better player because people would go read it and come back telling me I was a nutcase...but its true.

Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk

Last edited by logical; 07-24-2019 at 03:10 PM.
  
Reply With Quote
shooting from within
Old
  (#18)
ShootingArts
Smorg is giving the 7!
ShootingArts has a reputation beyond reputeShootingArts has a reputation beyond reputeShootingArts has a reputation beyond reputeShootingArts has a reputation beyond reputeShootingArts has a reputation beyond reputeShootingArts has a reputation beyond reputeShootingArts has a reputation beyond reputeShootingArts has a reputation beyond reputeShootingArts has a reputation beyond reputeShootingArts has a reputation beyond reputeShootingArts has a reputation beyond repute
 
ShootingArts's Avatar
 
Status: Online
Posts: 12,780
vCash: 2900
iTrader: 1 / 100%
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: South of the Border
   
shooting from within - 07-24-2019, 03:44 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by logical View Post
I probably should have realized that or more likely I knew that at one time and forgot. I quit telling people that Golf in the Kingdom made me a better player because people would go read it and come back telling me I was a nutcase...but its true.

Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk


I haven't found a book to match J Michael Plaxco's Shooting from Within. Of course since that book introduced so much to me for another book to impress me it either has to add a lot I didn't read there or move to a separate area of the mental game. I originally paid fifteen dollars for it. I see people asking as much as three hundred for it now. I shoulda stocked up. I did buy a handful of copies to send to friends that were pool or poker players but if they gained from it they never got back to me and said so.

People talk well of The Pleasure of Small Motions. I got the second edition and wasn't impressed. They put out the small original book and realized they had something that would sell. I believe it seemed little more than a booklet so they tried to flesh it out with a second part. That second part in particular was a disappointment. I think most of the people that speak highly of it must have purchased the first edition. The second part talks a lot about how to not lose but doesn't seem to say anything about winning. Not beating yourself is great but then you have to move on from there and beat the other player.

Hu
  
Reply With Quote
Old
  (#19)
Imac007
AzB Silver Member
Imac007 has a reputation beyond reputeImac007 has a reputation beyond reputeImac007 has a reputation beyond reputeImac007 has a reputation beyond reputeImac007 has a reputation beyond reputeImac007 has a reputation beyond reputeImac007 has a reputation beyond reputeImac007 has a reputation beyond reputeImac007 has a reputation beyond reputeImac007 has a reputation beyond reputeImac007 has a reputation beyond repute
 
Status: Offline
Posts: 286
vCash: 500
iTrader: 0 / 0%
Blog Entries: 1
Join Date: Dec 2017
   
07-24-2019, 04:18 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by logical View Post
I probably should have realized that or more likely I knew that at one time and forgot. I quit telling people that Golf in the Kingdom made me a better player because people would go read it and come back telling me I was a nutcase...but its true.

Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk
I also have "In The Zone" by Murphy and it turns out it is just a re-release of The Psychic Side of Sports". Itís available as an ebook. I have both releases.
  
Reply With Quote
Old
  (#20)
Imac007
AzB Silver Member
Imac007 has a reputation beyond reputeImac007 has a reputation beyond reputeImac007 has a reputation beyond reputeImac007 has a reputation beyond reputeImac007 has a reputation beyond reputeImac007 has a reputation beyond reputeImac007 has a reputation beyond reputeImac007 has a reputation beyond reputeImac007 has a reputation beyond reputeImac007 has a reputation beyond reputeImac007 has a reputation beyond repute
 
Status: Offline
Posts: 286
vCash: 500
iTrader: 0 / 0%
Blog Entries: 1
Join Date: Dec 2017
   
07-25-2019, 09:37 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by RailBanger View Post
. People have used rhythm for thousands of years to put themselves into a trance.
Your mention of rhythm sent me to my library. In 1988 I picked up a book by Dr. Richard Lonetto, The Rhythm, Being Your Best In Sport and Business. His strategy was about finding your own inner tempo. Itís about surfing personal rhythm. Mastery is bringing preparation, decision making and action into sync. It needs to be a practiced skill, not something you wait to magically appear.

This author spent a dozen years working with elite athletes before inheriting the family business. The world of sports performance lost a chance to delve into a great mind when he did.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ShootingArts View Post
I haven't found a book to match J Michael Plaxco's Shooting from Within.
Hu
I would love to get my hands on a copy but canít justify another $100 or more at this time, when I have $Kís tied up in performance topics already. One review said his principles and presentation were not just shooting related but had general motor skills application. Any thing you can share like TOC for starters would be appreciated. What specific perspectives, rules of thumb, hierarchy of importance did he present that resonated with you? Describe the thinking he reveals? How does he describe his process?

I really dig into descriptions now that I know cognition is embodied. Languageís function is description. Itís basically a encoded message the body is revealing, an interpretation, once it is in the form of words. When your follow the path the words take you into your own bodily sense of the message would you now use the same words he used to describe what you sense there? Reviews say he is no nonsense - direct, in his message.
  
Reply With Quote
Old
  (#21)
bstroud
Deceased
bstroud has a reputation beyond reputebstroud has a reputation beyond reputebstroud has a reputation beyond reputebstroud has a reputation beyond reputebstroud has a reputation beyond reputebstroud has a reputation beyond reputebstroud has a reputation beyond reputebstroud has a reputation beyond reputebstroud has a reputation beyond reputebstroud has a reputation beyond reputebstroud has a reputation beyond repute
 
Status: Offline
Posts: 855
vCash: 500
iTrader: 5 / 100%
Join Date: Dec 2004
   
07-25-2019, 10:18 AM

I don't think the Zone in Pool is a place you can get to by reading and pondering.

In my case it developed naturally based on countless hours of Practice and an relentless commitment to and focus on winning.

I had no money when I started playing Pool at 14 and I knew I Had to win just to get by. That kind of situation forces you to Focus on Winning and that Focus makes it possible to force yourself to do what others cannot.

I now remember many situations playing where I did the impossible to win that I did not remember at the time because I was in the Zone.

If anyone is interested I can cite a few examples.

Bill Stroud
  
Reply With Quote
Old
  (#22)
Black-Balled
He Rides the Skies
Black-Balled has a reputation beyond reputeBlack-Balled has a reputation beyond reputeBlack-Balled has a reputation beyond reputeBlack-Balled has a reputation beyond reputeBlack-Balled has a reputation beyond reputeBlack-Balled has a reputation beyond reputeBlack-Balled has a reputation beyond reputeBlack-Balled has a reputation beyond reputeBlack-Balled has a reputation beyond reputeBlack-Balled has a reputation beyond reputeBlack-Balled has a reputation beyond repute
 
Black-Balled's Avatar
 
Status: Offline
Posts: 42,655
vCash: 1200
iTrader: 14 / 100%
Blog Entries: 1
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: This Toilet Earth
  Send a message via AIM to Black-Balled  
07-25-2019, 10:34 AM

Its just a trip away.
Attached Images
 
  
Reply With Quote
The Zone Is Not A Singularity
Old
  (#23)
Imac007
AzB Silver Member
Imac007 has a reputation beyond reputeImac007 has a reputation beyond reputeImac007 has a reputation beyond reputeImac007 has a reputation beyond reputeImac007 has a reputation beyond reputeImac007 has a reputation beyond reputeImac007 has a reputation beyond reputeImac007 has a reputation beyond reputeImac007 has a reputation beyond reputeImac007 has a reputation beyond reputeImac007 has a reputation beyond repute
 
Status: Offline
Posts: 286
vCash: 500
iTrader: 0 / 0%
Blog Entries: 1
Join Date: Dec 2017
   
The Zone Is Not A Singularity - 07-25-2019, 12:35 PM

Part of the problem when we talk about "the zone" is that we nominalize it. The words present it as a noun. We speak about it like itís a place or space. "Experiencing" is a verb, an action description. Observing is a type of action that has a passivity to it. Words ending in ing, become static when we drop that activity appendage, we often view them as nouns.

My experience of zoning is that none of the experiencing was the same. There was a commonality that makes me lump them together. The flowing, the timing of observing and interacting with the balls are unifying, causing another nominalization, oneness. The transitioning trancing behaviors morph us through stages, each comprised of embracing, then letting go. The letting go is necessary or you get stuck in a flow breaking "off ramp". The "free" "way" of performance is full of off ramps just waiting to relegate you to the sidelines.

Denise McCluggage, a race car driver, expert skier and exceptional athlete is attributed with saying

"Change is the only constant"
For years I only heard that quote, then I became aware of the rest of what she told us
"Holding on is the only sin."

Combined they tell us so much about performing and living. Wisdom that needs to live on. We need to let go of each shot in turn, so we can write the rest of the story of ongoing performance. Learn to let go of the great shots, itís hard to shoot when you have one hand patting yourself on the back.
  
Reply With Quote
a state of being
Old
  (#24)
ShootingArts
Smorg is giving the 7!
ShootingArts has a reputation beyond reputeShootingArts has a reputation beyond reputeShootingArts has a reputation beyond reputeShootingArts has a reputation beyond reputeShootingArts has a reputation beyond reputeShootingArts has a reputation beyond reputeShootingArts has a reputation beyond reputeShootingArts has a reputation beyond reputeShootingArts has a reputation beyond reputeShootingArts has a reputation beyond reputeShootingArts has a reputation beyond repute
 
ShootingArts's Avatar
 
Status: Online
Posts: 12,780
vCash: 2900
iTrader: 1 / 100%
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: South of the Border
   
a state of being - 07-25-2019, 02:58 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Imac007 View Post
Part of the problem when we talk about "the zone" is that we nominalize it. The words present it as a noun. We speak about it like itís a place or space. "Experiencing" is a verb, an action description. Observing is a type of action that has a passivity to it. Words ending in ing, become static when we drop that activity appendage, we often view them as nouns.

My experience of zoning is that none of the experiencing was the same. There was a commonality that makes me lump them together. The flowing, the timing of observing and interacting with the balls are unifying, causing another nominalization, oneness. The transitioning trancing behaviors morph us through stages, each comprised of embracing, then letting go. The letting go is necessary or you get stuck in a flow breaking "off ramp". The "free" "way" of performance is full of off ramps just waiting to relegate you to the sidelines.

Denise McCluggage, a race car driver, expert skier and exceptional athlete is attributed with saying

"Change is the only constant"
For years I only heard that quote, then I became aware of the rest of what she told us
"Holding on is the only sin."

Combined they tell us so much about performing and living. Wisdom that needs to live on. We need to let go of each shot in turn, so we can write the rest of the story of ongoing performance. Learn to let go of the great shots, itís hard to shoot when you have one hand patting yourself on the back.


The zone I am referring to is a state of being. When we are tired we never refer to it as being tiring. What led to it was tiring but the state we are in is tired.

J Michael Plaxco and some I have talked to experience the zone in the same way I do. As the threads on here make obvious, others don't and they still refer to their state as the zone even if their state is entirely normal. I prepared for a major match, an end of season championship. My physical skills were there, my mental condition was there, I was ready to win. Some describe this preparedness as the zone, I don't see it as anything resembling the zone. I did win that match. I don't remember being in the zone for a single stage however.

I do remember the hippie types referring to being spaced out as zoning sometimes. I can't picture anything further from the zone than zoning or being in some sort of a trance. Far from being disconnected, in the zone I am more intensely connected to my body and everything around me than any other time in my life.

Somehow I have a feeling that a quote from Jimmy Buffett is appropriate: "If you don't know where you are going you probably aren't going to get there." We are all talking about different things and all calling these things "the zone". None of us are wrong but with no consensus what the zone is any agreement on how to get there is purely a fluke.

Hu
  
Reply With Quote
Old
  (#25)
Imac007
AzB Silver Member
Imac007 has a reputation beyond reputeImac007 has a reputation beyond reputeImac007 has a reputation beyond reputeImac007 has a reputation beyond reputeImac007 has a reputation beyond reputeImac007 has a reputation beyond reputeImac007 has a reputation beyond reputeImac007 has a reputation beyond reputeImac007 has a reputation beyond reputeImac007 has a reputation beyond reputeImac007 has a reputation beyond repute
 
Status: Offline
Posts: 286
vCash: 500
iTrader: 0 / 0%
Blog Entries: 1
Join Date: Dec 2017
   
07-25-2019, 03:43 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by ShootingArts View Post
The zone I am referring to is a state of being. When we are tired we never refer to it as being tiring. What led to it was tiring but the state we are in is tired.

J Michael Plaxco and some I have talked to experience the zone in the same way I do. As the threads on here make obvious, others don't and they still refer to their state as the zone even if their state is entirely normal. I prepared for a major match, an end of season championship. My physical skills were there, my mental condition was there, I was ready to win. Some describe this preparedness as the zone, I don't see it as anything resembling the zone. I did win that match. I don't remember being in the zone for a single stage however.

I do remember the hippie types referring to being spaced out as zoning sometimes. I can't picture anything further from the zone than zoning or being in some sort of a trance. Far from being disconnected, in the zone I am more intensely connected to my body and everything around me than any other time in my life.

Somehow I have a feeling that a quote from Jimmy Buffett is appropriate: "If you don't know where you are going you probably aren't going to get there." We are all talking about different things and all calling these things "the zone". None of us are wrong but with no consensus what the zone is any agreement on how to get there is purely a fluke.

Hu
In my original post I referenced a hypnotherapist, Stephen Wolinsky. My use of the word trance relates to his redefinition of the word based on his experience. Trances are everyday phenomena. We are in trance states most of the day. We have a waking routine (trance). We might have a commuting trance getting to work/school/??. We transition between them. We might interrupt them with breaks. Interruptions happen while we are in trance, like bathroom breaks, cell phones calls/messages. Sometimes we bookmark so we can get right back into a previous trance. Bookmarking is a good way to handle distractions. Bookmark your shot and gives the distraction its place and time. It usually gets pretty boring fast. Then "oh, where was I?" brings you back to the shot. Harder with a shot clock.

Playing good is its own trance. Giving it a mystical dimension only muddies the water. On occasion I have a session where I’m totally immersed in a run at the table, a selflessness. Other times my brain is dead quiet and I get to see my best self play, more a spectator mode. I can feel but don’t revel in the feeling, I let it go. It keeps me in the present but it seems timeless.

Your time and ongoing dialogue are appreciated. The topic has so many dimensions and perspectives that once experienced leave an imprint. It’s something we want to get back to and live rather than just visit occasionally. I see from the visits that people are checking this out. Maybe the ones that dig into the content here will mine a few nuggets and the efforts appreciated. Thanks for your part.

Last edited by Imac007; 07-25-2019 at 05:36 PM.
  
Reply With Quote
Old
  (#26)
strmanglr scott
All about Focus
strmanglr scott has a reputation beyond reputestrmanglr scott has a reputation beyond reputestrmanglr scott has a reputation beyond reputestrmanglr scott has a reputation beyond reputestrmanglr scott has a reputation beyond reputestrmanglr scott has a reputation beyond reputestrmanglr scott has a reputation beyond reputestrmanglr scott has a reputation beyond reputestrmanglr scott has a reputation beyond reputestrmanglr scott has a reputation beyond reputestrmanglr scott has a reputation beyond repute
 
strmanglr scott's Avatar
 
Status: Offline
Posts: 7,741
vCash: 500
iTrader: 0 / 0%
Join Date: Jul 2011
Location: Michigan
   
07-25-2019, 04:08 PM

Not sure I buy into the "zone" anymore.

I recently had a great night of playing pool, best night in months, if not longer. I didn't feel I was in a zone though.

I played calm, relaxed and focused. That focus is what really came through. That's what I work on the most is focus and consistency. Consciously practicing. Meaning, I practice very aware of each step I'm doing. The pre-shot routine is done with rigid steps each and every shot, very consciously aware of each step. It's difficult to play like this, but when the game is on, those steps are well ingrained and the time to think through them is over. I learned a long time ago, once I lean over on the shot, the thinking is turned off, it's time to stroke and nothing else. If I have a thought run through my head I'll get up and go through my psr again. That conscious practice through other steps of my psr helps shut the mind chatter up more when in an actual game. It's a funneling of focus, by eliminating extraneous stuff.

That focus imo leads to the quiet eye. When the eyes are busy shifting around, the mind is trying to gather information. By reducing the amount of info it needs the eye and mind calm. Much of that result comes from table time.

Anytime I am really eager to play and I have competition, my focus is at a different level. It's those times I play best. Now as far as outside things not being distracting or the night ending and not remembering much of it, it's because my focus is all on the table. Not even my opponent matters, it's just me against me. There's the shot and the next one and my route, just hit the shots now, one at a time.

You might say when I reach that level of focus I am in the zone, not sure about that myself. Because it's not something that just happens.

I did read the Inner Game of Tennis and it is good info. It takes a lot of the self talk out of the mind and you react and act more instinctually. The chatter in our heads creates tension and fear, that tightens muscles and keeps them from working smoothly.

I don't think I've ever played in the zone.


The rail is your best friend.
  
Reply With Quote
Old
  (#27)
Imac007
AzB Silver Member
Imac007 has a reputation beyond reputeImac007 has a reputation beyond reputeImac007 has a reputation beyond reputeImac007 has a reputation beyond reputeImac007 has a reputation beyond reputeImac007 has a reputation beyond reputeImac007 has a reputation beyond reputeImac007 has a reputation beyond reputeImac007 has a reputation beyond reputeImac007 has a reputation beyond reputeImac007 has a reputation beyond repute
 
Status: Offline
Posts: 286
vCash: 500
iTrader: 0 / 0%
Blog Entries: 1
Join Date: Dec 2017
   
07-25-2019, 08:48 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by strmanglr scott View Post
Not sure I buy into the "zone" anymore.

I recently had a great night of playing pool, best night in months, if not longer. I didn't feel I was in a zone though.

I played calm, relaxed and focused. That focus is what really came through. That's what I work on the most is focus and consistency. Consciously practicing. Meaning, I practice very aware of each step I'm doing. The pre-shot routine is done with rigid steps each and every shot, very consciously aware of each step. It's difficult to play like this, but when the game is on, those steps are well ingrained and the time to think through them is over. I learned a long time ago, once I lean over on the shot, the thinking is turned off, it's time to stroke and nothing else. If I have a thought run through my head I'll get up and go through my psr again. That conscious practice through other steps of my psr helps shut the mind chatter up more when in an actual game. It's a funneling of focus, by eliminating extraneous stuff.

That focus imo leads to the quiet eye. When the eyes are busy shifting around, the mind is trying to gather information. By reducing the amount of info it needs the eye and mind calm. Much of that result comes from table time.

Anytime I am really eager to play and I have competition, my focus is at a different level. It's those times I play best. Now as far as outside things not being distracting or the night ending and not remembering much of it, it's because my focus is all on the table. Not even my opponent matters, it's just me against me. There's the shot and the next one and my route, just hit the shots now, one at a time.

You might say when I reach that level of focus I am in the zone, not sure about that myself. Because it's not something that just happens.

I did read the Inner Game of Tennis and it is good info. It takes a lot of the self talk out of the mind and you react and act more instinctually. The chatter in our heads creates tension and fear, that tightens muscles and keeps them from working smoothly.

I don't think I've ever played in the zone.
Your description fits with my view of what allows your inner player to emerge. While the mind needs to do planning and decision making, it needs to listen to the body giving feedback in that process. Then the physical execution needs to follow. The stilling of the mind letís the player emerge and take center stage.

Quiet eyes is more than the gaze on target. The research was about eye movement overall. Your description of how darting eyes almost causes incoming data overload fits with the finding that better playerís eyes darted less. The scan of the line to target is more focused and linear. The eye movement stayed on the target line better and focused on the target longer prior to execution.

Thatís why I agree with you. I prefer to think about it as entering player mode. Itís like entering driver mode when taking the wheel. Of course, itís not like auto pilot, when you drive past your corner. The right mindset lets go. Holding onto any thought takes the player out of the flow of present ongoing experience. Thatís how a driver on auto pilot misses a turn, waylaid by holding onto a compelling thought.
  
Reply With Quote
Old
  (#28)
Imac007
AzB Silver Member
Imac007 has a reputation beyond reputeImac007 has a reputation beyond reputeImac007 has a reputation beyond reputeImac007 has a reputation beyond reputeImac007 has a reputation beyond reputeImac007 has a reputation beyond reputeImac007 has a reputation beyond reputeImac007 has a reputation beyond reputeImac007 has a reputation beyond reputeImac007 has a reputation beyond reputeImac007 has a reputation beyond repute
 
Status: Offline
Posts: 286
vCash: 500
iTrader: 0 / 0%
Blog Entries: 1
Join Date: Dec 2017
   
11-14-2019, 11:07 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Imac007 View Post
Your mention of rhythm sent me to my library. In 1988 I picked up a book by Dr. Richard Lonetto, The Rhythm, Being Your Best In Sport and Business. His strategy was about finding your own inner tempo. Itís about surfing personal rhythm. Mastery is bringing preparation, decision making and action into sync. It needs to be a practiced skill, not something you wait to magically appear.

This author spent a dozen years working with elite athletes before inheriting the family business. The world of sports performance lost a chance to delve into a great mind when he did.



I would love to get my hands on a copy but canít justify another $100 or more at this time, when I have $Kís tied up in performance topics already. One review said his principles and presentation were not just shooting related but had general motor skills application. Any thing you can share like TOC for starters would be appreciated. What specific perspectives, rules of thumb, hierarchy of importance did he present that resonated with you? Describe the thinking he reveals? How does he describe his process?

I really dig into descriptions now that I know cognition is embodied. Languageís function is description. Itís basically a encoded message the body is revealing, an interpretation, once it is in the form of words. When your follow the path the words take you into your own bodily sense of the message would you now use the same words he used to have describe what you sense there? Reviews say he is no nonsense - direct, in his message.
Update
There is a reason Iíve spent thousands on performance resources, Iím a sucker for great info. Iíve ordered the Shooting from Within book after reading all the praising reviews.
  
Reply With Quote
Old
  (#29)
EddieBme
AzB Silver Member
EddieBme has a reputation beyond reputeEddieBme has a reputation beyond reputeEddieBme has a reputation beyond reputeEddieBme has a reputation beyond reputeEddieBme has a reputation beyond reputeEddieBme has a reputation beyond reputeEddieBme has a reputation beyond reputeEddieBme has a reputation beyond reputeEddieBme has a reputation beyond reputeEddieBme has a reputation beyond reputeEddieBme has a reputation beyond repute
 
Status: Offline
Posts: 462
vCash: 500
iTrader: 4 / 100%
Blog Entries: 1
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Texas
   
11-15-2019, 12:04 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by bstroud View Post
I don't think the Zone in Pool is a place you can get to by reading and pondering.

In my case it developed naturally based on countless hours of Practice and an relentless commitment to and focus on winning.

I had no money when I started playing Pool at 14 and I knew I Had to win just to get by. That kind of situation forces you to Focus on Winning and that Focus makes it possible to force yourself to do what others cannot.

I now remember many situations playing where I did the impossible to win that I did not remember at the time because I was in the Zone.

If anyone is interested I can cite a few examples.

Bill Stroud
My thoughts exactly Bill.
Sure, i'd like to hear a few.
  
Reply With Quote
you may be disappointed
Old
  (#30)
ShootingArts
Smorg is giving the 7!
ShootingArts has a reputation beyond reputeShootingArts has a reputation beyond reputeShootingArts has a reputation beyond reputeShootingArts has a reputation beyond reputeShootingArts has a reputation beyond reputeShootingArts has a reputation beyond reputeShootingArts has a reputation beyond reputeShootingArts has a reputation beyond reputeShootingArts has a reputation beyond reputeShootingArts has a reputation beyond reputeShootingArts has a reputation beyond repute
 
ShootingArts's Avatar
 
Status: Online
Posts: 12,780
vCash: 2900
iTrader: 1 / 100%
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: South of the Border
   
you may be disappointed - 11-15-2019, 12:14 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Imac007 View Post
Update
There is a reason Iíve spent thousands on performance resources, Iím a sucker for great info. Iíve ordered the Shooting from Within book after reading all the praising reviews.


Shooting from Within is a fantastic book for pistol competitors. It was my primary source to shoot the first perfect score in a fifteen year old competition. It is best for pistol shooters though and it is best to read start to finish. There is a section on the mental game but there are also comments all through the book about the mental game. The one that clicks for you might not be in the section focused on the mental side. Might be hard for someone not a pistol competitor to not start skimming and everything needs to be read in context.

A little late now but I advised a poker player not to buy the book for $150. At fifteen dollars wholesale it was a great book for a pistol competitor, a good book for anyone interested in the mental game. At ten times that, not so much.

One issue is that you already have a strong background. The first book in an area introduces a lot of new ideas or quantifies things you have never tried to. Other later books have to reach beyond that to be of much interest. One thing that probably resonated with me, seems like Plaxco and I experienced what he calls the third level zone in exactly the same way. Those dismissing it as mystical or supernatural are missing the boat I believe. Most or all of the things that we consider mystical or supernatural now will be well understood and documented by science sometime in the future.

It has been over twenty years since I have read the book and having read much on the same subject a detailed description would probably contain errors. The book came along at the right time for me, making it a great book for me. I have never read a better book on his forms of pistol competition and I was engaged in similar activity. I had recognized the value of the mental game twenty years before but this was the first book that addressed it in ways that I didn't consider at least partially BS based on my past experience and reading. I was a voracious reader as a child and had read most of my mom's psychology books before my teens.

I hope you will review the book yourself and post it in this thread or post a link. I am very interested in your opinion of it.

Hu
  
Reply With Quote
Reply
Page 2 of 2 12

Thread Tools
Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump



Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.9
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.