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iusedtoberich
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05-26-2019, 06:19 AM

This is the space I wanted to use for the shop. The boss turned it into a conference room instead though. I ended up with less about half the space.

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05-26-2019, 06:29 AM

Here are some layouts I was experimenting with in the smaller space the boss allocated me. I stripped the tools list to the bare minimum to actually make anything. I had 6' and 8' long benches to choose from at Home Depot. The third version down is what I ended up going with. The room is 11' square.


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Bandsaw is in front of door so any long pieces can go outside of door. Bandsaw is higher than table behind it, so table doubles as outfeed table. Chop saw table needs its own length on both sides, so I can cut 8' long aluminum extrusion to most lengths. I got lucky, and in the physical design, I made the benches high enough, that the cart and a tool chest fit under the benches.

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05-26-2019, 06:49 AM

I forgot, before I brought the Taig to the office, I played with it for a couple of weeks at my apartment to make sure it still worked, and so I somewhat looked like I knew what I was doing before I brought it into the office. This thing has lived in two states, 1 house, and 2 apartments, before I finally did anything with it! ha ha.

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The only thing that was broken in 15 years was the computer. The CMOS battery died. I replaced it, and all was good again. I remember I bought the computer brand new from MicroCenter for I think 50 or 75. It had no OS on it, and I installed Linux to run with EMC (now renamed to Linux CNC). I couldn't figure it out back then, and decided to put windows XP on it and Mach 2. That worked for me. Those were I think the only options back then. Now there seem to be 10 options at least on software and OS.


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Figuring out MasterCam version X4.


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This was actually my first part I forgot about it, when the mill was still at my apartment a week before taking it into the office. From pretty bad, to half decent
  
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05-27-2019, 04:07 PM

Yesterday I made my first part using high speed machining. (even though my mill only goes 18 IPM, ha ha).


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My instruction sheet.


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Facing the top. Yes, I have a toolmaker's vise and 3" long parallels on order

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First high speed roughing path. It cuts the full depth shown to use more flute length, but the stepover is very small, I think I had it about 10 thou. My machine is so slow (18 IPM), that I think this took longer than a traditional tool path would have. But, I wanted to try it out, and I have motivation to get my machine working faster now.

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Second depth at the same roughing Toolpath.

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Then I went back with the same tool, and programed a second roughing Toolpath, to smooth it out more.
  
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05-27-2019, 04:11 PM

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This is what the 3d surface looked like at the end of the roughing passes with a 1/8" flat end mill.

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Contour the sides.


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Switch tools to 1/8" ball end mill.


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End of ball end mill finishing pass.

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Flip part over, and machine the back out, and break the bit because I made a mistake somewhere in the CAM on how much stock was left after flipping it over
  
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05-27-2019, 04:24 PM

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Switched to a larger 1/4" end mill and faced the back to the finished part bottom with simple jogs instead of going back to Mastercam


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The finished part.


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The surface finish leaves much to be desired, but it will get better. I definitely need to improve my workholding, stepper speed, and CAM toolpaths. I'll work on each problem as time arises.
  
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05-27-2019, 04:29 PM

That's really good to post what you have. I have not seriously looked at a Taig mini mill for cnc before. With the block out like you have done(adaptive machining), it is typical to be using upto 10% of the cutter as an axial cut depth, at the max depth of the cutting flute or for 3d of the cutter deep. The only reason for not going 4d at a time is the push off of the cutter and the resulting fatigue and cutter failure. With low hp head the cutter loading will need to be quite low, so the slower feedrate is a blessing. Won't be long and you'll be wanting a full blown cnc with 1000 inch cutting rates and 4g accelerations. That will make the lights in your building dim, lol. All good stuff that you have posted. A great thread to watch for sure. Adding vacuum stuff to pull away the swarf/chips is always a good thing when you can, and a small air blow to reduce the chips from recutting themselves increases tool life like you won't credit it.
There are a lot of cutting tools made to cut dry, and they do work really well. Just use air and vacuum to clear stuff. Those little splinters are a real pain too.
Neil


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05-27-2019, 05:01 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by conetip View Post
That's really good to post what you have. I have not seriously looked at a Taig mini mill for cnc before. With the block out like you have done(adaptive machining), it is typical to be using upto 10% of the cutter as an axial cut depth, at the max depth of the cutting flute or for 3d of the cutter deep. The only reason for not going 4d at a time is the push off of the cutter and the resulting fatigue and cutter failure. With low hp head the cutter loading will need to be quite low, so the slower feedrate is a blessing. Won't be long and you'll be wanting a full blown cnc with 1000 inch cutting rates and 4g accelerations. That will make the lights in your building dim, lol. All good stuff that you have posted. A great thread to watch for sure. Adding vacuum stuff to pull away the swarf/chips is always a good thing when you can, and a small air blow to reduce the chips from recutting themselves increases tool life like you won't credit it.
There are a lot of cutting tools made to cut dry, and they do work really well. Just use air and vacuum to clear stuff. Those little splinters are a real pain too.
Neil
Ha ha, thanks. I'm already hooked, I've been watching youtube until 3AM every night to figure out how to increase my speeds, get better at CAM, what electronics are available now, etc etc.

Question: is a roughing end mill (with the serrated edges) appropriate for a job like this? When I worked for a couple years in a toolroom years back, the real machinists there showed me to use them on the manual Bridgeport for the first passes. They cut like butter, and made turning the hand wheels cake. With CNC, are they ever used? Does high speed machining negate their use, and real shops just use solid carbide for everything? I was thinking to try a roughing end mill on this little Taig.
  
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05-27-2019, 05:36 PM

Oh, they offer the Taig CNC now with ballscrews, and closed loop stepper motors. It goes 200 IPM for I believe $3500.

I think the problem with mine is resonance in the screws. If I go much over 20 IPM, it goes nuts and stalls out. I saw some old post from the 2000's where a few people had the same Xylotex controller (that was very popular then), and fixed the problem making these rattling harmonic dampers. Then, the Gecko 540 came out, and solved the problem electronically. At least that is what I'm reading. So I think if I make the rattlers, I can get to 45 IPM, and if I get the Gecko 540, maybe 75 IPM (rapids of course ). I kind of want to make the rattlers for fun and to see if they really work. But I also think the more modern driver is the smarter choice.

Here is the rattler:
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And here is the link showing its effects and how the guy made it:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pv9tcg5_33s

I think this problem went away completely with the Gecko 540s...
  
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05-27-2019, 06:03 PM

Yeah they still use them. The difference being, that the newer versions of those cutters, now have the cerations separated. So the wall finish is somewhat quite smooth without the corrugated pattern of the older style cutters. There is also variable helix cutters that are quieter and ones with uneven spaced flutes as well. These all work remarkably well. On small mills, like my wood router, we tend to use 3 flute cutters, and have kept to 4mm now. Have found that a 4mm cutter has a higher rpm, as the spindle goes to 20k but I use it at 15k normally on Ali, and feed rate is small as well, 400mm / min so 15.75 inches per min feedrate. Plunge rate I use slow, 2 inches per min (50mm) and ramping is the same as regular feed, so 400mm. Max ramp depth per length of the cutter is shallow, 4 thou(0.1mm) but it will ramp to the normal full with depth of cut that I use which is only 1mm. The advantage of conservative speeds and feeds is that the cutter is unlikely to break, or clog, and will last for the run of 10 parts or how ever many you want to make. While it just does it's thing unattended, you can be working on the next thing. I don't use master cam, I use fusion 360 with HSMworks. The router has mach3 and it all goes real well. They have mastercam at work. Does great things and is a quite powerful software once you get the idea of how it works.


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