Help with Very Soft tips
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Tom1234
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Help with Very Soft tips - 10-06-2018, 06:55 AM

Thanks in advance for any help on this. Attached is a photo of a (supposedly) Very Soft tip. When I started to shape the tip with a new Lenox titanium blade, it made the sound of a trowel scraping across a brick!! As you will notice, it DID NOT ribbon like other tips. In fact, I would say it powdered. I store tips in a humidor to keep them from drying out. I only use Lenox blades to cut them down and shape. Did I get a mislabeled tip? Unfortunately, I've had this happen several times with this type of tip. Thanks for any suggestions.Name:  image.jpg
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10-06-2018, 08:08 AM

If you are hoping for something soft like an Elk Master in a layered tip. The Tiger Soft is the only one I know of that comes close. The soft, very soft and super soft labels put on most layered tips are there to compare to their own medium and hard tips and not to the single layered tips we all used to use.
  
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10-06-2018, 08:16 AM

Nice work though.


  
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10-06-2018, 09:54 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by cueman View Post
If you are hoping for something soft like an Elk Master in a layered tip. The Tiger Soft is the only one I know of that comes close. The soft, very soft and super soft labels put on most layered tips are there to compare to their own medium and hard tips and not to the single layered tips we all used to use.
Thanks Chris. Your Mid Size lathe works just like new after 4 years! I learned early on a soft layered tip was soft for a week or two. Now I know that soft tips are relative. Looks like I'll just recommend Triangles for those, who like me, want a soft dull thud sound from the tip. They may not last as long as a layered tip, but I just hate the sound of a brick hitting a concrete wall (the sound a hard tip makes). Thanks again.
  
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10-20-2018, 05:20 AM

Have you tried adjust your speed (rpm) on your lathe? I use a brand new DeWalt carbide blade on soft tips and sometimes adjusting the speed makes a big difference.

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10-20-2018, 06:36 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by italbomber View Post
Have you tried adjust your speed (rpm) on your lathe? I use a brand new DeWalt carbide blade on soft tips and sometimes adjusting the speed makes a big difference.

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I only use SLOW speeds on a layered tip. Learned early on the higher speeds can melt the glue and basically make the tip worthless. The tip did not ribbon on cutting down to size of ferrule (I've learned that if the tip doesn't cut into ribbons, you most likely have a bad tip). I use Lenox titanium blades for all work on tips. When I tried to cut it off, I had to use a dead blow hammer to get through the leather. I'm 6'4" and 220; not a weakling. Using the hammer eliminates cut fingers if the blade slips on extremely hard leather.
  
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