Ash grain type
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Zieglermt
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Ash grain type - 06-07-2018, 01:35 PM

Hey guys,
Iím looking to buy a new cue and Iíve been looking at Maximus cues
And I was wondering if anyone has noticed a difference
In ash chevron grain. Do you guy think if the grain is further apart
Does this mean the wood is less dense meaning the cue would be a lower
Deflecting cue? And relatively would a thicker close -together grain
Would result in a more sold hitting cue? I donít necessarily want a super solid cue
I am searching for a lower deflecting cue. So let me know what you
Guys think

Thanks,
Mark
  
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Ssonerai
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06-11-2018, 01:43 PM

Since no one else jumped in...

Never built an ash shaft, though have considered it, nor a snooker cue, so take this with a grain of salt.

I have made a few pool cues off and on starting in late 80's, and as a pro woodwhacker, have handled tens, if not hundreds of thousands of feet of lumber by now.

My take on your Q is that fast growth hardwoods that have widely spaced rings tend to have denser, ("heavier") somewhat livelier, and less stable characteristics. Often stronger, as well. Old slow growth hardwoods with lots of growth ring/inch tend to be a bit less dense (more grain/capillary lines = less lignin); maybe a bit less lively, but stable & more predictable (performance will change less over seasons or years).

Most people select OG, straight, parallel grain material for things like cue shafts largely due to stability and predictability. They "engineer" (craft?) in the desired performance profile by managing tapers, diameter & such.

I have the sense that things like ball bats go the other way - young fast growth with lots of lignin for a lively stronger sports "tool".

Maybe having registered my guess, a real English snooker cue maker will chime in to tell me how wrong this is. :

(I'm not wrong on the described attributes, but I don't know which ones a snooker cue maker prefers)

smt
  
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Zieglermt
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Today, 11:45 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ssonerai View Post
Since no one else jumped in...

My take on your Q is that fast growth hardwoods that have widely spaced rings tend to have denser, ("heavier") somewhat livelier, and less stable characteristics. Often stronger, as well. Old slow growth hardwoods with lots of growth ring/inch tend to be a bit less dense (more grain/capillary lines = less lignin); maybe a bit less lively, but stable & more predictable (performance will change less over seasons or years).

smt
So are you saying that wood with more grain is less dense and therefore perhaps more flexible? And thank you for your thoughtful reply.
  
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