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Forkbit tool for antique Brunswick rails.
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Pooldoctor
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Forkbit tool for antique Brunswick rails. - 05-30-2012, 08:24 AM

When using a forkbit tool to tighten railbolts what's the best tool to use to turn the bit . Crescent wrench, vise-grip pliers, or other options. Thanks for any advice.
  
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05-30-2012, 08:39 AM

I stuck mine in a deep well socket and then melted some wax into it to give it a tighter hold and fill in the voids. Then I just attach it to my ratchet like any other socket and it works great!
  
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05-30-2012, 09:00 AM

If I remember correctly (had an old Brunswick 30 some years ago) I used my auger hand drill. I believe they were made to fit those.
  
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05-30-2012, 10:18 AM

The bit is called a "spanner wrench" bit and if yours is like mine it is designed to fit in a hand crank drill called a "brace".
http://www.traditionalwoodworker.com...s.asp?dept=451


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05-30-2012, 11:34 AM

I have been using one like this for a year or so, I like it much better than the older style. I bought 2, still using the first one.

http://www.harborfreight.com/hand-to...nch-36554.html
  
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05-30-2012, 12:13 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by tsp&b View Post
The bit is called a "spanner wrench" bit and if yours is like mine it is designed to fit in a hand crank drill called a "brace".
http://www.traditionalwoodworker.com...s.asp?dept=451
You're right. It was called a "brace" not an "auger". I still have mine and it's at least 50 years old. Haven't used it in 20 years.
  
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05-30-2012, 03:44 PM

Never had a problem snugging t-bolts by hand.
I use a ratcheting combo wrench to tighten..
An open end or adjustable crescent works fine too.

  
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05-30-2012, 06:39 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by ArizonaPete View Post
You're right. It was called a "brace" not an "auger". I still have mine and it's at least 50 years old. Haven't used it in 20 years.
I used mine about a week ago.


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05-31-2012, 02:59 PM

try out a simple long nose plier .no adjustments, goes deeper in the fork holes ,lot more torque,always have one around...
  
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05-31-2012, 07:05 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by kid View Post
try out a simple long nose plier .no adjustments, goes deeper in the fork holes ,lot more torque,always have one around...
If youwant to use needlenose pliers it's best to have a spare for when you break off a point.
Been there done that.
  
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05-31-2012, 08:57 PM

For what it's worth, if you guys use a 1/4" drill bit to clean up the bit holes on the bolts, it'll do wonders for your bit to take hold in the holes so bit won't keep slipping off when you're trying to tighten or loosen the bolts.

Glen
  
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05-31-2012, 10:14 PM

Say a guy was going to use a torque wrench on these old bolts, what would a good number be to shoot for?


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06-01-2012, 04:18 AM

I'm interested in the answer to this being a torque nerd. Maybe we can get an answer
with or without washers. Are washers recommended? Drilling the holes is a great technique.
  
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06-01-2012, 06:21 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by 3kushn View Post
... Are washers recommended? ...
A flat and a star/lock washer for each bolt.
  
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06-01-2012, 06:31 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by 3kushn View Post
I'm interested in the answer to this being a torque nerd. Maybe we can get an answer
with or without washers. Are washers recommended? Drilling the holes is a great technique.
15ft lbs would be enough, more than that and you're going to keep compressing the wood sub-rail, less an they'll be loose.
  
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