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09-23-2019, 12:51 PM

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Originally Posted by markjames View Post
I never thought about it before, but the article said he likes to play in the evenings. I wonder how hard that is without modern lighting?


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09-23-2019, 02:07 PM

Hah!....you think we got some high-rollers today?...relatively pikers in history...

1859...Michael Phelan beat John Seereiter at 4-ball for what was considered the first
American championship.
250.000$ changed hands on that match, including side bets.

At that time you could have a full meal for less than one dollar...
That quarter million today would be worth 7,737,650.60 dollars.


Lionize your game.
http://www.alexpagulayan.com/

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Scott Lee
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09-23-2019, 03:54 PM

That would be the good work of our own JMDinVa...commonly known as Mr. Mayor! ...also a tournament director (VA State Championships), a PBIA certified instructor, a father and husband. You DO get around Josh!

Scott Lee
Director, SPF National Pool School Tour

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Jewett View Post
Anyone who is interested in the history of billiard games needs to get William Hendricks' booklet. The following is from page 14 of Hendricks' "History" in the section titled "The Eighteenth Century: Billiards for Everyman."
[billiards still expensive ...] Even when the affluent did not wish
to mingle, the less-wealthy colonists could be obstreperously
democratic when it came to billiards. A horrified British officer
describes a 1780 dispute at colonial billiards between a gentleman
and "a low fellow" at a public table.

I shall relate the way the accident happened, to shew the
ferociousness of the lower class in this country; this gentleman
was at play in the billiard-room, where there were a number of
gentlemen and several of our officers: a low fellow, who
pretends to gentility came in, and in the course of play, some
words arose, in which he first wantonly abused [the gentleman]
and afterward ... flew at him, and in an instant turned his eye
out of the socket, and while it hung upon his cheek, the fellow
was barbarous enough to endeavor to pluck it entirely out, but
was prevented.(*)


(*) From Jane Carson's "Colonial Virginians at Play," University
Press of Virginia, 1964, p. 85.

I have heard that billiards in Virginia is more civilized now.


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09-23-2019, 04:21 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by ShootingArts View Post
Billiard parlors were popular in the old west....The Earps really did enjoy the game.....
Don’t know the genealogy/relation, but the old poolhall where I grew up in Wyatt’s hometown (also Ralph G. birthplace) was once owned by the Earp family. 50’s population was 10,000 and had then at least 4 poolhalls (not counting numerous taverns with bar boxes, which were just starting to appear).
P.S. As far as I know, women were typically never admitted in small town poolrooms (the ‘good old days’). It wasn’t until Brunswick came up with the wholesome ‘Family Recreation’ concept in the mid-50s (?) and started installing pool tables in their bowling alleys to attract more women & children (and boost failing revenue) that the ‘general’ public really had free access.
  
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09-23-2019, 06:12 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Jewett View Post
Anyone who is interested in the history of billiard games needs to get William Hendricks' booklet. The following is from page 14 of Hendricks' "History" in the section titled "The Eighteenth Century: Billiards for Everyman."
[billiards still expensive ...] Even when the affluent did not wish
to mingle, the less-wealthy colonists could be obstreperously
democratic when it came to billiards. A horrified British officer
describes a 1780 dispute at colonial billiards between a gentleman
and "a low fellow" at a public table.

I shall relate the way the accident happened, to shew the
ferociousness of the lower class in this country; this gentleman
was at play in the billiard-room, where there were a number of
gentlemen and several of our officers: a low fellow, who
pretends to gentility came in, and in the course of play, some
words arose, in which he first wantonly abused [the gentleman]
and afterward ... flew at him, and in an instant turned his eye
out of the socket, and while it hung upon his cheek, the fellow
was barbarous enough to endeavor to pluck it entirely out, but
was prevented.(*)


(*) From Jane Carson's "Colonial Virginians at Play," University
Press of Virginia, 1964, p. 85.

I have heard that billiards in Virginia is more civilized now.
Trivia note , Jim Bowie was an eye plucker, of some renown.
Before he invented the Bowie Knife , weapons were illegal in Louisiana, so the men would harden their fingernails in a fire, for eye gouging.
  
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good information and good point!
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good information and good point! - 09-23-2019, 11:21 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by DynoDan View Post
Don’t know the genealogy/relation, but the old poolhall where I grew up in Wyatt’s hometown (also Ralph G. birthplace) was once owned by the Earp family. 50’s population was 10,000 and had then at least 4 poolhalls (not counting numerous taverns with bar boxes, which were just starting to appear).
P.S. As far as I know, women were typically never admitted in small town poolrooms (the ‘good old days’). It wasn’t until Brunswick came up with the wholesome ‘Family Recreation’ concept in the mid-50s (?) and started installing pool tables in their bowling alleys to attract more women & children (and boost failing revenue) that the ‘general’ public really had free access.


Thanks for the information about the Earp family and pool halls. The comments about women and children were a good reminder too. When I was thinking of available to all, I meant all social classes, men only. Of course ladies and children didn't belong in a billiard parlor.

I played in a few old pool halls. High ceilings, one or two rows of tables, a bit dark except where the lights were on over a table people were playing on. No women, children, dogs, or juke box, if anyone got a bit loud they might be warned once but if they persisted in rambunctious behavior they were politely but firmly escorted to the door! A slightly raised voice calling for a rack boy was as noisy as things got. Rackers were forever "boys" no matter how old and dignified or decrepit they might be. Adding a nickel to the dime to rack was the gentlemanly thing to do, giving a quarter a rack was being a bit flashy.

The good ol' days when times were rotten! I miss them.

Hu
  
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Pushout
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09-24-2019, 06:00 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by lfigueroa View Post
5,200 licensed *pool halls* in one county and that shows how billiards was more popular?!

And you seemed to have missed that Danny MsGoorty was a 3C player and he was talking about his home room. Of course he'd choose a home room that catered to billiard players. But Chicago and most major cities had a ton of pool tables back in the day.

Lou Figueroa
I'm so sorry, I seem to gotten confused.


I had a stroke. I had it when I came in, I KNOW I did

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Straight Pool is not a race!

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Last edited by Pushout; 09-24-2019 at 06:19 AM.
  
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