Go Back   AzBilliards.com > Main Category > Main Forum
Reload this Page Questions about instructors
Reply
Page 1 of 11 1 23 Last »
 
Share Thread Tools Rate Thread
Questions about instructors
Old
  (#1)
7forlife
AzB Silver Member
7forlife has a reputation beyond repute7forlife has a reputation beyond repute7forlife has a reputation beyond repute7forlife has a reputation beyond repute7forlife has a reputation beyond repute7forlife has a reputation beyond repute7forlife has a reputation beyond repute7forlife has a reputation beyond repute7forlife has a reputation beyond repute7forlife has a reputation beyond repute7forlife has a reputation beyond repute
 
Status: Offline
Posts: 1,490
vCash: 500
iTrader: 0 / 0%
Join Date: May 2010
   
Questions about instructors - 06-21-2013, 09:14 PM

Now there is good reasons to lead to a possible cause for my lack of knowledge but i'lll skip that and get right to the point.

Why is that if instructors are soooo good at what they do and have all these qualities that so many people value i.e. fundaments and all that, then why is it that you "well I" don't see then in tourneys bringing the pain and being a better ad for themselves? or even why haven't I heard of them a few years back (in case anyone wants to say that they don't play anymore) doing the same.

There is always new of a player gone coach or announcer in other sports but I have no knowledge of this in pool, of course with the very very few exceptions. Car companies started off racing to better show what there production cars can do in order to boost sales.

can someone shed some light on this matter for me please, and for the love of _____ forum police and critics please stay of this one with your negative comments and what about C.J or T. Robles or any other known person. I feel that I am asking a good question and would rather read sensible replies and not have to filter through yours.


Why did you spend the money on a Predator shaft, your problem is aiming not deflection

The less you BET, the more you lose when you WIN

I'm sorry to tell you but your problem was not bad rolls, it was bad decisions
  
Reply With Quote

Old
  (#2)
JesseBfan
Motivation, where are u?
JesseBfan has a reputation beyond reputeJesseBfan has a reputation beyond reputeJesseBfan has a reputation beyond reputeJesseBfan has a reputation beyond reputeJesseBfan has a reputation beyond reputeJesseBfan has a reputation beyond reputeJesseBfan has a reputation beyond reputeJesseBfan has a reputation beyond reputeJesseBfan has a reputation beyond reputeJesseBfan has a reputation beyond reputeJesseBfan has a reputation beyond repute
 
JesseBfan's Avatar
 
Status: Offline
Posts: 668
vCash: 1690
iTrader: 6 / 100%
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Irmo SC
   
06-21-2013, 09:30 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by 7forlife View Post
Now there is good reasons to lead to a possible cause for my lack of knowledge but i'lll skip that and get right to the point.

Why is that if instructors are soooo good at what they do and have all these qualities that so many people value i.e. fundaments and all that, then why is it that you "well I" don't see then in tourneys bringing the pain and being a better ad for themselves? or even why haven't I heard of them a few years back (in case anyone wants to say that they don't play anymore) doing the same.

There is always new of a player gone coach or announcer in other sports but I have no knowledge of this in pool, of course with the very very few exceptions. Car companies started off racing to better show what there production cars can do in order to boost sales.

can someone shed some light on this matter for me please, and for the love of _____ forum police and critics please stay of this one with your negative comments and what about C.J or T. Robles or any other known person. I feel that I am asking a good question and would rather read sensible replies and not have to filter through yours.
One theory I have on this is that most of the guys who are knee deep in action have their minds wrapped around just that ACTION! They need to keep that mindset and therefore to take time to teach would not be beneficial in their eyes(most prob see it this way not all). I do however think that for the student to respect the teacher enough to actually hear what he/she is saying and do what they say to do it helps to k ow that person can in fact do what they ask of you. And or have some accomplishments of their own. One of the best teachers of the game that I know isn't a world champion but you better believe you have to be world class to beat him when he's playing.


why stop at half-full?
  
Reply With Quote
Old
  (#3)
Tramp Steamer
One Pocket enthusiast.
Tramp Steamer has a reputation beyond reputeTramp Steamer has a reputation beyond reputeTramp Steamer has a reputation beyond reputeTramp Steamer has a reputation beyond reputeTramp Steamer has a reputation beyond reputeTramp Steamer has a reputation beyond reputeTramp Steamer has a reputation beyond reputeTramp Steamer has a reputation beyond reputeTramp Steamer has a reputation beyond reputeTramp Steamer has a reputation beyond reputeTramp Steamer has a reputation beyond repute
 
Tramp Steamer's Avatar
 
Status: Offline
Posts: 6,563
vCash: 500
iTrader: 3 / 100%
Join Date: Nov 2009
   
06-21-2013, 10:56 PM

For the same reason college business professors aren't millionaires.


Steamer Cue Sports Ltd. Purveyor of two fine quality cues, the Miracle, and the Wonder. Our motto says it all: "If it's a good cue, it's a Wonder." "If it's a straight cue, it's a Miracle."

I am a member in good standing in the Lock Society as: Tramp Lock.
  
Reply With Quote
HIS references are hard to top. . .
Old
  (#4)
ridinda9
AKA: Sandy Bagger
ridinda9 has a reputation beyond reputeridinda9 has a reputation beyond reputeridinda9 has a reputation beyond reputeridinda9 has a reputation beyond reputeridinda9 has a reputation beyond reputeridinda9 has a reputation beyond reputeridinda9 has a reputation beyond reputeridinda9 has a reputation beyond reputeridinda9 has a reputation beyond reputeridinda9 has a reputation beyond reputeridinda9 has a reputation beyond repute
 
Status: Offline
Posts: 2,187
vCash: 500
iTrader: 0 / 0%
Join Date: May 2010
Location: worlds fastest beach
   
HIS references are hard to top. . . - 06-21-2013, 11:26 PM

I'm not certain now that he's relocated to North Carolina, but when he lived in Florida Ray Martin was offering priivate instruction in his home for $50 per hour.
BCA hall of famer
2 time world straight pool champion
literally wrote the book(s) on aiming and strategy

A trip to North Carolina and a weekend with Ray will cost less and improve your game more than almost any of the seminars out there, just because of the 1-on-1 undivided attention you'll receive.

(I got my training from Ray the old-fashioned way ~ by losing game after game to him at Clifton billiards back in the 80s) (Ray got more of my rent money than my landlord ever did)


"the good old days weren't always good , tomorrow ain't as bad as it seems " ~ Billy Joel , 1984

"I'm an angry Gumball , as angry as can be !" ~ Wrigley's Extra , 2003

"Whether it's a foul or not depends on the rules you're playing by . If it's bar rules , bring larger friends" ~ Bob Jewett , 2011
  
Reply With Quote
Old
  (#5)
woody_968
BRING BACK 14.1
woody_968 has a reputation beyond reputewoody_968 has a reputation beyond reputewoody_968 has a reputation beyond reputewoody_968 has a reputation beyond reputewoody_968 has a reputation beyond reputewoody_968 has a reputation beyond reputewoody_968 has a reputation beyond reputewoody_968 has a reputation beyond reputewoody_968 has a reputation beyond reputewoody_968 has a reputation beyond reputewoody_968 has a reputation beyond repute
 
woody_968's Avatar
 
Status: Offline
Posts: 1,980
vCash: 950
iTrader: 39 / 100%
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Indiana
   
06-22-2013, 01:28 AM

This is a good question 7, and one that is often talked about around pool rooms. Probably the most common comments you will here is if he can't beat (insert accomplished players name here) then what can he teach me?

I think there are a few reasons some great instructors aren't at the top of the best players lists.

For one, it is a different skill set. Teaching is not an easy task. You have to not only know what to look for, but you have to be able to get the message across. This often means being able to say or demonstrate the same thing in several different ways as people learn and understand in different ways. There really are not that many great players that are also great teachers for this reason. In fact, I would say some of the best players don't understand what they are doing, they just do it. And in other cases what they think they are doing is not what they are actually doing at all. This applies to everyone and is a reason that video during a lesson is so critical. A lot of people don't believe they are doing things until you show them on tape.

In some ways you can say there are things that go into a champion that can't be taught. I am not talking about mechanics or game theory. I am talking about the ability to execute under pressure among other things.

Instructors that are busy at all do not have the time to be top of the heap players. To be a champion not only do you have to have time to play and practice. You MUST be "under the gun" so to speak a great deal of time. A player can do all the drills he wants to, and yes they will help make him a better player, but if he is never in pressure situations he will not hold up as well as someone that is.

I do agree that to be taken seriously as an instructor you should be able to play at a certain level. But I don't think you have to be a "Pro" player to be an great teacher. I have studied this game for many years, have gone through the BCA teaching program, and have spent some time teaching. I got away from it for several reasons. But I can tell you that I have helped one of my friends improve different aspects of his game even though he was already a far better player than I was.

Again, great question and I look forward to reading some of the other responses.

Woody
  
Reply With Quote
Old
  (#6)
JesseBfan
Motivation, where are u?
JesseBfan has a reputation beyond reputeJesseBfan has a reputation beyond reputeJesseBfan has a reputation beyond reputeJesseBfan has a reputation beyond reputeJesseBfan has a reputation beyond reputeJesseBfan has a reputation beyond reputeJesseBfan has a reputation beyond reputeJesseBfan has a reputation beyond reputeJesseBfan has a reputation beyond reputeJesseBfan has a reputation beyond reputeJesseBfan has a reputation beyond repute
 
JesseBfan's Avatar
 
Status: Offline
Posts: 668
vCash: 1690
iTrader: 6 / 100%
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Irmo SC
   
06-22-2013, 01:51 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by woody_968 View Post
This is a good question 7, and one that is often talked about around pool rooms. Probably the most common comments you will here is if he can't beat (insert accomplished players name here) then what can he teach me?

I think there are a few reasons some great instructors aren't at the top of the best players lists.

For one, it is a different skill set. Teaching is not an easy task. You have to not only know what to look for, but you have to be able to get the message across. This often means being able to say or demonstrate the same thing in several different ways as people learn and understand in different ways. There really are not that many great players that are also great teachers for this reason. In fact, I would say some of the best players don't understand what they are doing, they just do it. And in other cases what they think they are doing is not what they are actually doing at all. This applies to everyone and is a reason that video during a lesson is so critical. A lot of people don't believe they are doing things until you show them on tape.

In some ways you can say there are things that go into a champion that can't be taught. I am not talking about mechanics or game theory. I am talking about the ability to execute under pressure among other things.

Instructors that are busy at all do not have the time to be top of the heap players. To be a champion not only do you have to have time to play and practice. You MUST be "under the gun" so to speak a great deal of time. A player can do all the drills he wants to, and yes they will help make him a better player, but if he is never in pressure situations he will not hold up as well as someone that is.

I do agree that to be taken seriously as an instructor you should be able to play at a certain level. But I don't think you have to be a "Pro" player to be an great teacher. I have studied this game for many years, have gone through the BCA teaching program, and have spent some time teaching. I got away from it for several reasons. But I can tell you that I have helped one of my friends improve different aspects of his game even though he was already a far better player than I was.

Again, great question and I look forward to reading some of the other responses.

Woody
What he said.


why stop at half-full?
  
Reply With Quote
Old
  (#7)
Toncam
Another Bum !
Toncam has a reputation beyond reputeToncam has a reputation beyond reputeToncam has a reputation beyond reputeToncam has a reputation beyond reputeToncam has a reputation beyond reputeToncam has a reputation beyond reputeToncam has a reputation beyond reputeToncam has a reputation beyond reputeToncam has a reputation beyond reputeToncam has a reputation beyond reputeToncam has a reputation beyond repute
 
Toncam's Avatar
 
Status: Offline
Posts: 537
vCash: 500
iTrader: 2 / 100%
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Las Vegas
   
06-22-2013, 01:53 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by 7forlife View Post

Why is that if instructors are soooo good at what they do and have all these qualities that so many people value i.e. fundaments and all that, then why is it that you "well I" don't see then in tourneys bringing the pain and being a better ad for themselves? or even why haven't I heard of them a few years back (in case anyone wants to say that they don't play anymore) doing the same.

Well i have always heard that there are those who can do, but cant teach and those who can teach, but cant do.
Thats kind of over simplifying it somewhat i guess but its pretty close. There are hitting and pitching coaches in Baseball who were never stellar performers but they know how it can be done and know how to translate it to others.
Some people just have the eye to spot improvements or weaknesses, why they cant do it themselves at that high level is a very good question.
  
Reply With Quote
Old
  (#8)
backplaying
AzB Silver Member
backplaying has a reputation beyond reputebackplaying has a reputation beyond reputebackplaying has a reputation beyond reputebackplaying has a reputation beyond reputebackplaying has a reputation beyond reputebackplaying has a reputation beyond reputebackplaying has a reputation beyond reputebackplaying has a reputation beyond reputebackplaying has a reputation beyond reputebackplaying has a reputation beyond reputebackplaying has a reputation beyond repute
 
Status: Offline
Posts: 2,090
vCash: 500
iTrader: 1 / 100%
Join Date: Oct 2008
   
06-22-2013, 02:10 AM

I believe a instructor who's top speed was a high B level, can teach someone to get to a high B level, but I think they would be the wrong instructor to teach someone at a high B level, to get to a high A level or higher.. I just think it would be hard to teach a level you never played at. I know you will hear, well, so and so taught a certain golfer and he never played like that. Well, the fact is most golf instructors are or were scratch golfers or better, and they are mostly teaching the swing. Big difference. Its true, some good players can't teach, but its also a myth that most good players can't teach.
  
Reply With Quote
Old
  (#9)
DrGonzo
As your attorney...
DrGonzo has a reputation beyond reputeDrGonzo has a reputation beyond reputeDrGonzo has a reputation beyond reputeDrGonzo has a reputation beyond reputeDrGonzo has a reputation beyond reputeDrGonzo has a reputation beyond reputeDrGonzo has a reputation beyond reputeDrGonzo has a reputation beyond reputeDrGonzo has a reputation beyond reputeDrGonzo has a reputation beyond reputeDrGonzo has a reputation beyond repute
 
DrGonzo's Avatar
 
Status: Offline
Posts: 8,609
vCash: 500
iTrader: 15 / 100%
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Minneapolis, MN
   
06-22-2013, 03:12 AM

The same reason Butch Harmon, David Leadbetter, Hank Haney, Jim Flick, et al have not won countless major championship.s


Playing Cue:
Nitti - Lucky 7's

Case: Dennis Swift - Lucky 7's

Originally posted by Ron Swanson
“It is acceptable for ISIS to behead people”

Originally Posted by Ugotda7
"You (DrGonzo) are just so smart"

Originally Posted by asiasdad
"I would trust the pedophile more."

Gonzo Lock
  
Reply With Quote
Old
  (#10)
JoeW
AzB Silver Member
JoeW has a reputation beyond reputeJoeW has a reputation beyond reputeJoeW has a reputation beyond reputeJoeW has a reputation beyond reputeJoeW has a reputation beyond reputeJoeW has a reputation beyond reputeJoeW has a reputation beyond reputeJoeW has a reputation beyond reputeJoeW has a reputation beyond reputeJoeW has a reputation beyond reputeJoeW has a reputation beyond repute
 
Status: Offline
Posts: 2,885
vCash: 500
iTrader: 0 / 0%
Join Date: Nov 2006
   
06-22-2013, 04:37 AM

Maybe this article will help you understand the difference between a teacher and a player. It applies to most professions.

http://billiards.colostate.edu/PBRev..._A_Teacher.htm

Most teachers can play better than the average player because they have spent years learning their subject area. However, they are not motivated to compete. In my own area (forensic psychology) there were many who made much more money than I did in the application of clinical principles. None-the-less when they had a difficult question they would be at my university lab seeking answers from my colleagues where we lived on the cutting edge of knowledge.

Many of the scientist / teacher / practitioners that I worked with had turned down high paying jobs in the private sector to remain in the university where the motivation is to learn and teach. It an occupation unto itself.

The best way I have heard the joke told is

Those who can do.
Those who can't teach.
Those who can't teach, teach teachers (college professors).

With all that said, a retired player can often be an excellent teacher. It depends on their ego and the reasons for teaching. There are many excellent teachers who are no longer playing on the national scene.

Last edited by JoeW; 06-22-2013 at 04:51 AM.
  
Reply With Quote
Old
  (#11)
boyersj
Indiana VNEA State Champ
boyersj has a reputation beyond reputeboyersj has a reputation beyond reputeboyersj has a reputation beyond reputeboyersj has a reputation beyond reputeboyersj has a reputation beyond reputeboyersj has a reputation beyond reputeboyersj has a reputation beyond reputeboyersj has a reputation beyond reputeboyersj has a reputation beyond reputeboyersj has a reputation beyond reputeboyersj has a reputation beyond repute
 
boyersj's Avatar
 
Status: Offline
Posts: 365
vCash: 500
iTrader: 4 / 100%
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Evansville
   
06-22-2013, 05:23 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by backplaying View Post
I believe a instructor who's top speed was a high B level, can teach someone to get to a high B level, but I think they would be the wrong instructor to teach someone at a high B level, to get to a high A level or higher.. I just think it would be hard to teach a level you never played at. I know you will hear, well, so and so taught a certain golfer and he never played like that. Well, the fact is most golf instructors are or were scratch golfers or better, and they are mostly teaching the swing. Big difference. Its true, some good players can't teach, but its also a myth that most good players can't teach.
I will chime in, being a "new" instructor this year. I would have agreed with you until I got my certification in January. I had many people asking me to teach them (and their kids), so I figured hey you know what... I am going to get a formal lesson so I could make sure what I was telling them was correct - because true enough I could get them to a certain level, but was I also causing them to be limited by my own ability?

Now, I know exactly what to look for in a player. I know how to tell them to fix what they are doing to cause inconsistency. Once consistent, then competition is the method to hone the skills developed. I can't help you aim, I can't help you cope with pressure, and I can't help your hand-eye coordination.

So why a teacher instead of a super strong player? They don't know how to convey. They likely never thought of it if they are a natural. Or they have become so good at overcoming bad habits that if they taught anyone, it would be detrimental.

I can say this, anyone who has taken a lesson would not think their instructors ability level impedes their future. Take a lesson, from anyone to find out more about yourself as a player. I am so glad I did, because now I know what to work on to really improve. Before I really didn't understand why I was stuck on a plateau.


____________________
Steve Boyer
PBIA Certified Instructor
Proud member of the SPF Family
Fargorate: 622
  
Reply With Quote
Not a great player
Old
  (#12)
Donny Lutz
Ferrule Cat
Donny Lutz has a reputation beyond reputeDonny Lutz has a reputation beyond reputeDonny Lutz has a reputation beyond reputeDonny Lutz has a reputation beyond reputeDonny Lutz has a reputation beyond reputeDonny Lutz has a reputation beyond reputeDonny Lutz has a reputation beyond reputeDonny Lutz has a reputation beyond reputeDonny Lutz has a reputation beyond reputeDonny Lutz has a reputation beyond reputeDonny Lutz has a reputation beyond repute
 
Donny Lutz's Avatar
 
Status: Offline
Posts: 2,062
vCash: 500
iTrader: 5 / 100%
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Gainesville, FL
   
Smile Not a great player - 06-22-2013, 05:38 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by 7forlife View Post
Now there is good reasons to lead to a possible cause for my lack of knowledge but i'lll skip that and get right to the point.

Why is that if instructors are soooo good at what they do and have all these qualities that so many people value i.e. fundaments and all that, then why is it that you "well I" don't see then in tourneys bringing the pain and being a better ad for themselves? or even why haven't I heard of them a few years back (in case anyone wants to say that they don't play anymore) doing the same.

There is always new of a player gone coach or announcer in other sports but I have no knowledge of this in pool, of course with the very very few exceptions. Car companies started off racing to better show what there production cars can do in order to boost sales.

can someone shed some light on this matter for me please, and for the love of _____ forum police and critics please stay of this one with your negative comments and what about C.J or T. Robles or any other known person. I feel that I am asking a good question and would rather read sensible replies and not have to filter through yours.
Speaking for myself only.

I've never considered myself a great player. My father introduced me to bowling and pool in 1955. I was a bit of a natural at pool, and not so much at bowling, but I was more attracted to the latter than the former. Bowling was huge back then, and my sports idols were Don Carter, Ray Bluth, Dick Weber, Ned Day and Andy Varipapa. The league and tournament bowling results were published daily in the local newspapers, while pool was not even considered a sport. I had visions of becoming a pro bowler and had the physical skills to do so. By 1967 I held most of the scoring records in southwest Wisconsin, and I played pool more as a hobby. I became a Certified Bowling Instructor in 1958, while still in high school, and coached junior leagues on and off for a decade or so.

But my best years bowling netted me a very small amount of cash, - about $1K in my record-setting year. The following year I made over $4 K playing on a bar table with a cue off the wall, so I began putting a little more time into pool. But I didn't take pool seriously until after my retirement from bowling in '73. That retirement came from frustration at the $$ potential, a drinking problem and a serious disagreement with a league director.

I managed a pool hall briefly in 1965, and began teaching the basics there. I also organized the first pool league in west Wisconsin in 1966, which I directed for three seasons, till I took a job in another town. This freed me up to put together some monster teams in the '70s and '80s. My teams won two VNEA Minnesota State team titles, and one of those teams won the VNEA North American Title in '86, though I sat out that season because of some legal problems.

Between 1970 and 2012, I managed to win League MVP 43 times, and was City Singles champ five times. In '87, I moved to the DC area for a job, and retired for two years. Began playing again when asked to join an APA 8-ball team. Because of my previous success (rated a "master" player in the VNEA), the APA made me a 7 "for life" after playing my first match in two innings. The next year I left the APA (didn't care for the rules) and joined a BCA team that took 3rd in Vegas in '92, when I took 5th in the Singles, and became a BCA Certified Instructor. The BCA had approached me, as I had a reputation as a championship team coach.

I was house "pro" at two different places, including the beautiful new Champion Billiards in Laurel, MD, which closed not long after I left. After some of my best years, I retired again after having my cues stolen in '95, and moved to Florida.

Beginning again in 2000, I played in several local leagues, and tried several times to organize a BCA league and then an ACS league, with no success. Played APA for a few disappointing seasons and retired again in 2010.

I've never won a pro tournament. I've never beaten any pros out of more than a few bucks, although I came out money ahead every year I played from 1960 through 2009. I wrote a column briefly for Inside Pool mag, and then as a "Guest Instructor" for Pool & Billiard, who named me one of their "Top 20" instructors in '09. My "specialties" are cue ball control and strategy.

After some serious health problems beginning in 2002, my game has dropped off, though I have continued to improve my teaching skills. At this time, I'm not even one of the top players in Gainesville. I absolutely have to avoid cigarette smoke, so I barely play at all...there are very few non-smoking pool halls in Florida.
When I teach, it has to be early in the day, before the venues get smokey. This also prevents me from competing in tournaments. I can live with this because I have other interests. I garden, read voraciously, and have written eight books, three of which are currently in print.

So I'm definitely one of those instructors of whom people say, "He's not that good, why get lessons from him? I'd love to tell them about my health problems, my age (people don't believe I'm almost 71), and my rather unlucky employment experience, but I try to refrain from that. Now I play very little other than when giving lessons. And I haven't run more than three or four racks in years. But I still love to teach; I get great pleasure from helping others.


Donny L
PBIA/ACS Instructor
Regular Columnist for Pool & Billliard Magazine
  
Reply With Quote
Old
  (#13)
Sealegs50
AzB Silver Member
Sealegs50 has a reputation beyond reputeSealegs50 has a reputation beyond reputeSealegs50 has a reputation beyond reputeSealegs50 has a reputation beyond reputeSealegs50 has a reputation beyond reputeSealegs50 has a reputation beyond reputeSealegs50 has a reputation beyond reputeSealegs50 has a reputation beyond reputeSealegs50 has a reputation beyond reputeSealegs50 has a reputation beyond reputeSealegs50 has a reputation beyond repute
 
Sealegs50's Avatar
 
Status: Offline
Posts: 1,763
vCash: 500
iTrader: 13 / 100%
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: CT
   
06-22-2013, 05:56 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tramp Steamer View Post
For the same reason college business professors aren't millionaires.
Some of them are.
  
Reply With Quote
fantastic so far
Old
  (#14)
7forlife
AzB Silver Member
7forlife has a reputation beyond repute7forlife has a reputation beyond repute7forlife has a reputation beyond repute7forlife has a reputation beyond repute7forlife has a reputation beyond repute7forlife has a reputation beyond repute7forlife has a reputation beyond repute7forlife has a reputation beyond repute7forlife has a reputation beyond repute7forlife has a reputation beyond repute7forlife has a reputation beyond repute
 
Status: Offline
Posts: 1,490
vCash: 500
iTrader: 0 / 0%
Join Date: May 2010
   
fantastic so far - 06-22-2013, 06:00 AM

This is going just as i would of like to see it go so thanks to all who have put in there input. To touch on a few things previously mentioned how about if i throw this in the mix.

Someone mentioned (and I knew this to be so also) that it's the pressure and so forth, but how about if I made this match-up.

Take a top pro and a top instructor, lets put them in a room with a table but they never get to meet and there is no shot clock. One person shoots and walk of into a isolated section, the next player comes out and shoots what he see. Run with this scenario for a bit and tell me. If this was a giant tournament for pros vs instructors alike (and just for argument sake) we have it run 10 consecutive times, who do you think would come out on top most of the time.

And as for someone else saying that a coach can take someone to a strong B but most likely not above it is in my personal opinion that "a strong B is the ultimate goal for most and a tangible go that most should try to reach" because this is the person who can and has understand the major parts of the game such as cue ball and stroke and such, but to go above is where experience "HAS" to come in. To advance past this B one must now devote his time not just in practice but in action or competition. See the skill set above a B is where (in my mind) were an old school player/hustler/road player will now teach you the finer "said with a real smooth voice" this in pool like how to work your opponent and all that good stuff that you will either not learn on your own or will take you year of time on the road yourself.


Why did you spend the money on a Predator shaft, your problem is aiming not deflection

The less you BET, the more you lose when you WIN

I'm sorry to tell you but your problem was not bad rolls, it was bad decisions
  
Reply With Quote
Old
  (#15)
Quesports
AzB Silver Member
Quesports has a reputation beyond reputeQuesports has a reputation beyond reputeQuesports has a reputation beyond reputeQuesports has a reputation beyond reputeQuesports has a reputation beyond reputeQuesports has a reputation beyond reputeQuesports has a reputation beyond reputeQuesports has a reputation beyond reputeQuesports has a reputation beyond reputeQuesports has a reputation beyond reputeQuesports has a reputation beyond repute
 
Status: Offline
Posts: 4,356
vCash: 500
iTrader: 15 / 100%
Join Date: Feb 2004
   
06-22-2013, 06:01 AM

Joe Tucker and Mark Wilson are both instructors that can play at a pretty high level. JMO!
  
Reply With Quote
Reply
Page 1 of 11 1 23 Last »

Thread Tools
Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump



Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.9
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity (Lite) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.