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Maybe stupid question about cue weight.
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smoochie
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Maybe stupid question about cue weight. - 07-28-2020, 05:35 PM

I've been playing with a cue for a very long time, a good player who I know personally wanted to try it, he's a very good player and a friend of mine, then he said to me, wow that is a light cue.

He asked me what the weight of that cue, and I told him that I don't know, I really didn't.

He brought a scale and it measured 17.1 oz, then he told me "Oh you're doing it wrong" now I didn't know why he told me this, he said that I will play much better with 19oz, or at least the minimum 18oz if I desire, but never below 18oz.

Why did he tell me this? What do you guys think, do you agree with him? I rate him as an A player so that's why his words may be right.
  
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07-28-2020, 05:46 PM

It's all personal preference. Table time makes way more difference than the weight of your cue. Really you can get pretty good with what you're used to.


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07-28-2020, 05:49 PM

Just because someone is a good player does not mean they know what is good for you. It is my opinion that weight means nothing without context. Balance is more important. I’ve played with 21 oz cues which felt like 18oz when they were parallel to the table and 18 oz cues they were too butt heavy. My cues range from 17 to 21. Play with a cue that allows you to play your best.


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07-28-2020, 06:03 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by smoochie View Post
I've been playing with a cue for a very long time, a good player who I know personally wanted to try it, he's a very good player and a friend of mine, then he said to me, wow that is a light cue.

He asked me what the weight of that cue, and I told him that I don't know, I really didn't.

He brought a scale and it measured 17.1 oz, then he told me "Oh you're doing it wrong" now I didn't know why he told me this, he said that I will play much better with 19oz, or at least the minimum 18oz if I desire, but never below 18oz.

Why did he tell me this? What do you guys think, do you agree with him? I rate him as an A player so that's why his words may be right.
Cue is right 4 you, do not sweat that someone else think it not perfect. If the Cue work for you GREAT.

IMHO there are no magic Cues, player skill is the magic.


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07-28-2020, 06:07 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by CocoboloCowboy View Post
Cue is right 4 you, do not sweat that someone else think it not perfect. If the Cue work for you GREAT.

IMHO there are no magic Cues, player skill is the magic.
It is great for me as I feel that it is.

He is the pro of the house, so I have no clue why he told me this then, he said I'm doing it wrong.
  
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07-28-2020, 06:36 PM

What's best for you is what works best for you, and familiarity is probably the most important factor in that. But there are objective differences in how different weight cues might perform for you.

Have you tried anything else?

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07-28-2020, 06:38 PM

Some may disagree, but, in pool as in so many other things, confidence is a critical component. You need to feel good about your cue -- whether its perfectly balanced and a perfect fit or its just plain "lucky". Your buddy may have meant well, but imho . . . Did you like it before? Feel it was good? If so, pay him no mind. If you were/are uncomfortable, consult a tech and seek a remedy. Also, try out other folks's cues and see if anything feels better. If your cue gets in your head, it can ruin you. My best evaluation of a cue is that it feels "right" or natural -- I don't ordinarily "notice" it, except occasionally, appreciation filters in. As far as an ounce or two, 97.5% of my game is stance, stroke, and attitude, the other 2.5% is not going to matter unless it affects one of the first three. Your mind and body unconsciously compensate for most anomalies.

My first cue was a real POS, but it had a joint (aluminum), a wrap, and a case, plus it went home with me. At 15, I thought I could beat the world with it and sometimes shot way over my head.


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07-28-2020, 06:39 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Patrick Johnson View Post
What's best for you is what works best for you, and familiarity is probably the most important factor in that. But there are objective differences in how different weight cues might perform for you.

Have you tried anything else?

pj
chgo
I had another cue back in the day, it felt heavier but I'm not sure, never paid attention to weight that much, it was ok cue, but I don't know its weight.
  
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07-28-2020, 07:50 PM

Before I got my first cue, I played "off the wall". I hid "good" house cues (straight ones whose shafts and tips I had worked) to use again later, but most times I had to roll a few cues and inspect tips before I found something I could work on. Of course, the house cues were all different. I did not know what a good tip was until I owned my own cue, but I could sure recognize bad ones. (In the old days, however, there were some good house cues. Today, I don't think there are any.) This is where the consistency of owning one's own cue kicks in. Good, bad, or indifferent, my cue was the same every day, and I could actually select the brand and type of tip I played with and shape it like I wanted. And, when I played, I did not have to hunt and pray and, usually, substitute.

Here's a good question: which advantage of owning your cue do you feel is more important: a) weight/balance, b) tip selection and maintenance, c) consistent equipment, or d) other? I tend to think b or c, but what do I know.


"It's all in the wrist, with a deck or a cue"
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07-28-2020, 08:38 PM

Smoochie, go back to your question about gloves and powder. Sticky fingers and sticky shafts are a real pib, but the real problem is the distraction they present. It's the same deal with a cue you can't trust: the pib relocates to your head and interferes with what your head is supposed to do when you shoot good pool. The more distractions you can eliminate, the more your game improves.

Since I've got on my philosopher's hat tonight, remember this. Playing great and winning are wonderful but not everything -- especially since most are not going to be in the 1%. The most important thing is to enjoy yourself while improving both your game and yourself. Shooting pool/hanging in the pool hall are incredible educational experiences. You will make many new acquaintances, some good, some you can't take home, and some will become lifelong friends. Never lose sight of the fact that pool is a game and, at base, is supposed to be fun, so take it easy, be careful, and have fun. And, until at least, your 90th birthday, I hope you are able to take on the world in races to seven giving two games on the wire.


"It's all in the wrist, with a deck or a cue"
Epitaph of Frankie Machine

"Yet once you've come to be part of this particular patch, you'll never love another.
Like loving a woman with a broken nose, you may well find lovelier lovelies.
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07-28-2020, 09:39 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by smoochie View Post
I've been playing with a cue for a very long time, a good player who I know personally wanted to try it, he's a very good player and a friend of mine, then he said to me, wow that is a light cue.

He asked me what the weight of that cue, and I told him that I don't know, I really didn't.

He brought a scale and it measured 17.1 oz, then he told me "Oh you're doing it wrong" now I didn't know why he told me this, he said that I will play much better with 19oz, or at least the minimum 18oz if I desire, but never below 18oz.

Why did he tell me this? What do you guys think, do you agree with him? I rate him as an A player so that's why his words may be right.
I agree with your friend...your cue is a bit lighter than my snooker cue.
18 ounce minimum I want for a pool cue.
Try a 19 ounce for at least 3 days,
If you appreciate the heavier cue, check to see if your cue has a weight bolt...it would be
easy to change.


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12 to 32 ounces
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12 to 32 ounces - 07-28-2020, 10:49 PM

I have played with cues from twelve to twenty-four or six ounces then jumped to two pounds even, deliberately experimenting with weight. For some reason about three times the weight of the cue ball is the easiest cue to play with, 18 to 19.5 ounces.

However, my cue weighs 16 to 16.5 ounces depending on shaft and I'd like to drop another two or three ounces.

I greatly respect some of the people that have already given opinions, some I don't know, so don't think I am putting down any opinions. However, here is where I part company with the crowd. The easiest stick to play with isn't necessarily the best. A very heavy stick is extremely hard to play with, like trying to gently drive tacks with a five pound hammer. The extremely light cue is just the opposite, you are trying to drive a sixteen penny nail with a tack hammer.

However, I had some people I respected who were on the twelve ounce kick. Pool wasn't the center of my life at the time and I fought that danged twelve ounce cue for about three months. I had to do all of the work! However, because I did all of the work I found a level of control that was hard to match with a heavier cue although I had better touch with all cues after mastering the twelve ounce one. With that twelve ounce one I tore up a weekly tournament until I quit because I figured I was bad for my friend's business. I could thread a needle with that stick, I could stop on a dime and give nine cents change.

Try different things and you have to try them awhile to decide if they are better or worse, at least a few weeks. You may find the lighter cue is better for you, you may want to join the crowd. One thing, cloth has gotten faster and cushions have more bounce than in the days the 19 to 19.5 ounce cues took over. I think a 17 to 18 ounce cue today would play much like the 19 to 20 ounce cues did twenty or thirty years ago.

Don't be afraid to experiment, don't be afraid to go with the crowd sometimes too. What is best for you will be what matters.

Hu
  
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07-29-2020, 12:13 AM

Let’s set things straight once and for all time.

There isn’t any ideal weight for any pool cue.

Doesn’t matter who made it or the cue’s weight.

The ideal weight is whatever the player prefers.

Simple as that....Ex: some people salt their food.
Others don’t......what one likes the other doesn’t.

Same is true of all pool cues, custom & production.

Anyone telling you different is blowing smoke up your ass.


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*Ed Prewitt Custom '05 - Level 8 - Flat Ivory Joint
*Bob Owen Custom - Level 8 (s/d 5-4-14) - Flat Ivory Joint
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07-29-2020, 12:55 AM

17.1 oz is not too light.
  
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07-29-2020, 01:35 AM

to me, the balance is more important than the weight
listen to everybody, but decide for yourself


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