Accurate cue placement-Is it technique or is it talent

FranCrimi

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
What are “twisting fingers”?

I grip with the index & middle fingers + thumb to avoid things like twisting.

pj
chgo
LOL. That's a term I made up. Based on my experience in teaching players, when a player develops a habit of twisting the cue, the culprit is usually the thumb and index fingers. Ultimately, the entire hand turns under, but those two fingers seem to trigger the process. When I have the player experiment by shooting and taking those two fingers completely off the cue, they stop twisting. It's not a permanent fix, just a means to have them feel what it's like to shoot without a twist. The fix involves having them change the pressure points of their grip fingers.
 

DTL

SP 219
Silver Member
LOL. That's a term I made up. Based on my experience in teaching players, when a player develops a habit of twisting the cue, the culprit is usually the thumb and index fingers. Ultimately, the entire hand turns under, but those two fingers seem to trigger the process. When I have the player experiment by shooting and taking those two fingers completely off the cue, they stop twisting. It's not a permanent fix, just a means to have them feel what it's like to shoot without a twist. The fix involves having them change the pressure points of their grip fingers.
I don't think so. I believe twisting is a subconscious way to keep to stick going in a straight line......and works very well for many players, including top tier pros (Earl and Johnny).

Here are some videos that describe some of what I've been talking about.
 

Patrick Johnson

Fish of the Day
Silver Member
This is pretty much my grip - thumb & first two fingers with all around relaxed contact - rear fingers just along for the ride.

grip1.JPG


But I don't finish like he does with a clench - I keep the rear fingers relaxed throughout, even (especially) on harder shots.

grip2.JPG


pj
chgo
 

FranCrimi

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I don't think so. I believe twisting is a subconscious way to keep to stick going in a straight line......and works very well for many players, including top tier pros (Earl and Johnny).

Here are some videos that describe some of what I've been talking about.
Well sure. You gave one of the psychological reasons for twisting --- it's called steering. It's a habit, not a benefit. I explained what happens physically. Take the thumb and index finger off the cue and try to twist it. It's really really really hard to twist it.
 

DTL

SP 219
Silver Member
Well sure. You gave one of the psychological reasons for twisting --- it's called steering. It's a habit, not a benefit. I explained what happens physically. Take the thumb and index finger off the cue and try to twist it. It's really really really hard to twist it.
For players with certain grips, the twisting is essential for straight cueing. It is normal or natural for their stroke......not steering. Next time you can watch certain pro players (Earl) in person, watch the points (inlays) on their stick rotate one way on the backswing and then reverse on the forward stroke.

Nearly all the best cueist in the world (snooker players) are doing something very similar to the grip videos posted above. Fundamentally it is the standard, and should be taught to all beginning players.....best chance for success.

Here's another good vid.
 
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Scott Lee

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
For players with certain grips, the twisting is essential for straight cueing. It is normal or natural for their stroke......not steering. Next time you can watch certain pro players (Earl) in person, watch the points (inlays) on their stick rotate one way on the backswing and then reverse on the forward stroke.

Nearly all the best cueist in the world (snooker players) are doing something very similar to the grip videos posted above. Fundamentally it is the standard, and should be taught to all beginning players.....best chance for success.
DTL...I have to completely disagree with your philosophy. Twisting the cue purposefully is a very poor technique, and should never be taught to anyone...especially beginners. Earl holds his cue with his thumb pointed at his body, so he starts out with the cue twisted, and keeps it twisted all the way through his delivery. Definitely nothing to try emulate. The wrist needs to hang straight down, not cocked, have a very loose grip, and swing through the delivery to the CB.

Scott Lee
2019 PBIA Instructor of the Year
Director, SPF National Pool School Tour
 

DTL

SP 219
Silver Member
Scott

You need to go back and read all the previous posts. If you did you'd see that I advise players to use a grip more in line with what is taught by snooker instructors.....especially if new to the game. The twisting of the cue came up when discussing various grip types......tighter grips and ones that keep the back fingers on the cue throughout the whole stroke (esp the backswing). Read the whole thread. Thanks.

DTL
 
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FranCrimi

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Scott

You need to go back and read all the previous posts. If you did you'd see that I advise players to use a grip more in line with what is taught by snooker instructors.....especially if new to the game. The twisting of the cue came up when discussing various grip types......tighter grips and ones that keep the back fingers on the cue throughout the whole stroke (esp the backswing). Read the whole thread. Thanks.

DTL
Jumping in here about your comment about 'tighter' grips ---- Just because the pinkie is on the cue, doesn't automatically make it a tighter grip. In fact, if you loosen the thumb and index finger and keep the pinkie on the cue, you have a fairly loose grip. I think you should experiment more on your own. Studying other players is fine, but you also need more direct experience. Practice with different pressure points on different fingers. You'll see what I mean.
 

straightline

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
DTL...I have to completely disagree with your philosophy. Twisting the cue purposefully is a very poor technique, and should never be taught to anyone...especially beginners. Earl holds his cue with his thumb pointed at his body, so he starts out with the cue twisted, and keeps it twisted all the way through his delivery. Definitely nothing to try emulate. The wrist needs to hang straight down, not cocked, have a very loose grip, and swing through the delivery to the CB.
This is a fundamental flaw in your curriculized take on education. Earl doing it "wrong" was able accomplish the primary goal of that era; kick everybody's (give or take) ass.
 

Patrick Johnson

Fish of the Day
Silver Member
This is a fundamental flaw in your curriculized take on education. Earl doing it "wrong" was able accomplish the primary goal of that era; kick everybody's (give or take) ass.
Thinking poor technique is advisable because a handicapped pro can cope with it is a fundamental flaw in your take on education.

pj
chgo
 

straightline

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Thinking poor technique is advisable because a handicapped pro can cope with it is a fundamental flaw in your take on education.

pj
chgo


There's your wishful extemporizing again. You'd make a crappy lawyer as well. Moving right along, if homemade lowlifes (not exactly appropriate but I like the rhythm of it) can dominate the field, there must be something wrong with the curriculum.
 
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