best pool role models?

evergruven

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
wondering which professional players instructors would recommend watching to see "the right way" to play? and why?
 

FranCrimi

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
First of all, if they're pros, then they're successful players, right? So you can learn something by watching any of the pros play. As far as who to emulate, why not start at the top? Pick the highest ranked players and study them. They must be doing something REALLY right, correct?

As a teacher, however, making recommendations to a client, I will take my client's style of play and preferences into consideration and recommend a pro that I think will help them grow and not cause them to try to turn into someone they're not.
 

Positively Ralf

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Someone once recommended me to watch Mike Sigel and Buddy Hall and that was because they recognize two things about these players that I have a tendency to do as a player.

1. I always go for safety play over shooting first. Mike Sigel was the player to watch for me because his defensive game was usually always on point and it was the first option for Sigel the majority of the time.

2. I play a very simple game and that's where buddy comes in. So I study his play to see how it can improve mine.

Needless to say, it has worked so far for me.
 

MamboFats

Member
I recommend watching the matches of Niels Feijen and Albin Ouschan.
Their technique, stance and follow through on the shot are exemplary. Their insight in the game is on the highest level. Their numerous victories and accomplishments speak for themselves.
 

tomatoshooter

Well-known member
Someone once recommended me to watch Mike Sigel
I like Mike Sigel's game. He seems like the most accomplished player that a regular person can really learn from. What I mean by that is guys like Earl and Efren are so gifted that I can't do what they do. Mike, while obviously gifted, has a game that doesn't seem to necessitate such superhuman ability. It seems like a mere mortal's game, just performed with incredible precision and strategy. I don't see him doing unimaginable things with a cue ball, he just does the things I do but with much more precision and reliability.
 

spktur

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I like Mike Sigel's game. He seems like the most accomplished player that a regular person can really learn from. What I mean by that is guys like Earl and Efren are so gifted that I can't do what they do. Mike, while obviously gifted, has a game that doesn't seem to necessitate such superhuman ability. It seems like a mere mortal's game, just performed with incredible precision and strategy. I don't see him doing unimaginable things with a cue ball, he just does the things I do but with much more precision and reliability.
He was a great player with a lot of accomplishments but as a role model he's an ego maniac and a constant whiner.
 

bbb

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
to me hunter lumbardo has superb fundamentals.
what do you think
 

garczar

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Most of the good Euro players have really good fundamentals. I will say that trying copy any player's actual physical moves can lead you down a deep rabbit hole. Watch their psr, their pace and their pattern play but don't try to copy a stroke. I know a few guys that tried copying that 'pump handle' Filipino stoke and they got ALL out out whack.
 

Imac007

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Most of the good Euro players have really good fundamentals. I will say that trying copy any player's actual physical moves can lead you down a deep rabbit hole. Watch their psr, their pace and their pattern play but don't try to copy a stroke. I know a few guys that tried copying that 'pump handle' Filipino stoke and they got ALL out out whack.
Adding John Morra to the list makes sense.
A legitimate top pro that makes a role model for both left and right handed players.
A simple, consistent repeatable process anyone from top player to beginner can mimic and see benefits.
 

FranCrimi

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Adding John Morra to the list makes sense.
A legitimate top pro that makes a role model for both left and right handed players.
A simple, consistent repeatable process anyone from top player to beginner can mimic and see benefits.
I hear that word a lot --- 'repeatable.' Not picking on you for it because I know lots of people use it. But what does it mean, exactly, when it comes to shooting pool? What exactly is repeated?
 

Imac007

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
I hear that word a lot --- 'repeatable.' Not picking on you for it because I know lots of people use it. But what does it mean, exactly, when it comes to shooting pool? What exactly is repeated?
Top athletes in sports, especially target sports, talk about sticking with their process, and trusting it, was the key to breakthrough seasons.
Process was discovering the key activities, they need to repeat, to replicate success.
One of those activities, in pool, is a pre-shot routine.
Process can extend beyond the arena into life routines.
Ronnie O runs, Earl S plays tennis and most athletes have exercise regimes.

In the context here is was referring more to how he approaches the shot.
How much time does he take to examine and plan the table?
Once a shot is chosen, how is it approached?
Repeatable, means those elements that appear in shot after shot, including planning and aiming, not just a PSR..
 
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FranCrimi

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Top athletes in sports, especially target sports, talk about sticking with their process, and trusting it, was the key to breakthrough seasons.
Process was discovering the key activities, they need to repeat, to replicate success.
One of those activities, in pool, is a pre-shot routine.
Process can extend beyond the arena into life routines.
Ronnie O runs, Earl S plays tennis and most athletes have exercise regimes.

In the context here is was referring more to how he approaches the shot.
How much time does he take to examine and plan the table?
Once a shot is chosen, how is it approached?
Repeatable, means those elements that appear in shot after shot, including planning and aiming, not just a PSR..
OK. I get it. I'll add to that by throwing out a few ideas on 'repeatability.' When I took that course on mental toughness all those years ago with sports psychologist Jim Loehr, one of the most important lessons I learned from it was that toughness doesn't mean rigidity. It's the opposite. It means flexibility -- having the knowledge and ability to change and adapt to changing situations and circumstances. Sort of like rolling with the punches.

Repetition is fine as long as it doesn't imprison you and prevent you from rolling with the punches.
 

Imac007

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
toughness doesn't mean rigidity. It's the opposite. It means flexibility -- having the knowledge and ability to change and adapt to changing situations and circumstances. Sort of like rolling with the punches.
When it comes to the stance i used the word morph to describe that flexibility.
I also related the stories of Greg Louganis and Tony Fernandez, in a different forum thread on developing expertise, on a like theme.
They mention getting it done with less than perfect form, about making the adjustments needed to succeed, adjusting to the situation.
Jeremy Jones calls that part, “shot keys”, seeing the differences that make a difference, away from the norm, that add resilience that your game
 

Imac007

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Not sure these examples are the true repeatability meant here though.
A straight stroke is a better example.
Finishing the stroke would be another.
Staying down on the shot, another.
Anything that is repeated consistently to arrive at the desired outcome.
As pointed out by the examples minor modifications situationally apply.
 
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