Break Stats -- 2021 U.S. Open Pool Championship (9-Ball), September 2021

AtLarge

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
Here are some aggregate break statistics from the last two days of the 2021 US Open Pool Championship played September 13-18, 2021 at Harrah's Resort Atlantic City, in New Jersey, with pay-per-view streaming in the USA on DAZN. This was a 243-player 9-Ball event produced by Matchroom Sport. Carlo Biado won the tournament, defeating Aloysius Yapp in the final match.

First-round matchups included the seeding of 92 players based on their world ranking and performance in prior major events. The event was double elimination down to the final 16 players (8 on the winners' side and 8 on the one-loss side). It was then single-elimination play from that point to the conclusion. Races were to 9 during the first two days of play and then 11 for the last 4 days except for the Finals (race to 13). The main commentators in these streamed matches were Phil Yates, Jeremy Jones, Nick Schulman, and Karl Boyes. The referees were John Leyman, Marcel Eckardt, and Brendan Moore. The MC/announcer/interviewer was Michael Bridge.

Conditions -- The conditions for the streamed matches I tracked included:
• A Diamond 9-foot table with 4 1/4" corner pockets;​
• Blue Simonis cloth;​
• Aramith Tournament Black balls with a black-measles cue ball;​
• triangle rack (templates were used earlier in the event);​
• referee racks with the 1-ball on the foot spot (2-ball not necessarily in back location);​
• winner breaks from anywhere behind the head string;​
• no 3-point (illegal-break) rule, but a "forceful" break is required;​
• 30-second shot clock (60 sec. after the break), with one 30-sec. extension per player per rack;​
• foul on all balls;​
• 3-foul rule in effect (did not occur);​
• jump cues allowed;​
• all slop counts; and​
• lag for the break in each match.​

These stats are for all 7 matches (132 games) streamed on the final two days on the feature table (Table 1) in the main arena. These matches constituted just 1.5% of the total of 482 matches played in the tournament (21 scheduled matches did not occur because of withdrawals and forfeits), but 47% of the matches in the single-elimination portion of the event (final 16 players). These 7 matches are listed here in the order in which they were played.

Fri. Sept. 17
1. Aloysius Yapp defeated Shane Van Boening 11-5 (Last 16)​
2. Carlo Biado d. David Alcaide 11-10 (Last 16)​
3. Yapp d. Rodrigo Geronimo 11-6 (Quarterfinal)​
4. Naoyuki Oi d. Fedor Gorst 11-9 (Quarterfinal)​

Sat. Sept. 18
5. Yapp d. Dennis Orcollo 11-6 (Semifinal)​
6. Biado d. Oi 11-9 (Semifinal)​
7. Biado d. Yapp 13-8 (Finals)​

Overall results

Successful breaks (made at least one ball and did not foul):

Match winners -- 87% (68 of 78)​
Match losers -- 87% (47 of 54)​
Total -- 87% (115 of 132)​

Breaker won the game:
Match winners -- 69% (54 of 78)​
Match losers -- 54% (29 of 54)​
Total -- 63% (83 of 132)​

Break-and-run games on all breaks:
Match winners -- 37% (29 of 78)​
Match losers -- 41% (22 of 54)​
Total -- 39% (51 of 132)​

Break-and-run games on successful breaks (made at least one ball and did not foul):
Match winners -- 43% (29 of 68)​
Match losers -- 47% (22 of 47)​
Total -- 44% (51 of 115)​

Here's a breakdown of the 132 games (for match winners and losers combined).

Breaker made at least one ball and did not foul:
Breaker won the game: 77 (58% of the 132 games)​
Breaker lost the game: 38 (29%)​

Breaker fouled on the break:
Breaker won the game: 0 (0%)​
Breaker lost the game: 4 (3%)​

Breaker broke dry (without fouling):
Breaker won the game: 6 (5%)​
Breaker lost the game: 7 (5%)​

Therefore, whereas the breaker won 63% (83 of 132) of all games,
He/she won 67% (77 of 115) of the games in which the break was successful (made at least one ball and did not foul).​
He/she won 35% (6 of 17) of the games in which the break was unsuccessful (fouled or dry).​

Break-and-run games -- The 51 break-and-run games represented 39% of all 132 games, 61% of the 83 games won by the breaker, and 44% of the 115 games in which the break was successful (made a ball and didn't foul).

The 51 break-and-run games consisted of 1 five-pack (by Yapp), 5 three-packs (2 by Oi, 2 by Yapp, and 1 by Biado), 9 two-packs, and 13 singles.

9-Balls on the break -- The only 9-ball made on the break was on a fouled break, so it was spotted.
 
Last edited:

AtLarge

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
Miscellany from the data for the 2021 US Open Pool (9-Ball) Championship:
[This relates only to the 7 matches streamed on the feature table on the final two days, not to all matches in the event.]

• The most balls made on a single break was 4, done once each by Oi and Orcollo (both wins by B&R).

• The average number of balls made on the break was 1.4 (this includes dry and fouled breaks). On successful breaks (made at least one ball and did not foul), the average was 1.6.

• 57% (75 of 132) of the games ended in one inning – 39% (51) won by the breaker (B&R) and 18% (24) won by the non-breaker. Eleven percent (14 of 132) of the games lasted more than 3 innings.

• 46% (61 of 132) of the games were run out by the player who was at the table following the break. These run-outs were:
- By the breaker after successful breaks (B&R games) – 44% (51 of 115)​
- By the non-breaker after fouls on the break – 100% (4 of 4)​
- By the non-breaker after dry breaks – 46 (6 of 13)​

• The player who made the first ball after the break:
- Won the game in that same inning 67% of the time (89 of 132)​
- Won the game in a later inning 12% of the time (16 of 132)​
- Lost the game 20% of the time (27 of 132)​

• The loser won an average of 7.5 games in the 6 races to 11 (excludes the final match, a race to 13). One of the 7 matches went to hill/hill. The most lopsided match was one at 11-5.

• The average elapsed time for the 6 races to 11 was 117 minutes. The average minutes per game for all 132 games (including the Finals) was 6.4. The elapsed time was measured from the lag until the winning ball was made, so it includes time for racking and commercial breaks. Commercial breaks were significant in these matches, generally occurring after every 3 games in a match, and lasting about 3 minutes each.

• The match lowest in average minutes per game, at 5.7, was Oi d. Gorst 11-9. The match highest in average minutes per game, at 6.9, was Biado d. Yapp 13-8.

• Breaking fouls averaged 1 for every 33.9 games, other fouls 1 for every 5.5 games, and missed shots about 1 for every 2.1 games.

• About 33% of the games involved one or more safeties.
 

Poolplaya9

Tellin' it like it is...
Silver Member
AtLarge, thank you for always taking the time to share the statistics you gather from various events time after time. I know that many, many members are bound to find them interesting and informative even if you don't get to hear that as often as you perhaps should. They also are and will continue to be a lasting historical archive of information about our game that would have otherwise eventually been lost to time. A truly great contribution to the game sir!
 
Last edited:

pt109

WO double hemlock
Gold Member
Silver Member
Thanx, AtLarge
Man, they were breaking great..
..the whole field
 

AtLarge

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
Here's a comparison of a few stats from the single-elimination portion of this event in 2021 and 2019. Note that the stats for 2019 are for all 15 matches in that stage versus just 7 of the 15 matches this year. Three differences to note between the two years were (1) the pocket mouths were smaller this year, with 4¼" at the corners instead of 4½", (2) the 1-ball was racked on the spot this year instead of the 9-ball, and (2) the shot clock was 30 seconds this year instead of 40 seconds. Otherwise, the equipment and rules were pretty much the same.

Successful breaks (made at least one ball and did not foul):
2021 -- 87% (115 of 132)​
2019 -- 79% (205 of 261)​

Breaker won the game:
2021 -- 63% (83 of 132)​
2019 -- 65% (169 of 261)​

Break-and-run games, on all breaks:
2021 -- 39% (51 of 132)​
2019 -- 34% (89 of 261)​

Break-and-run games, on successful breaks:
2021 -- 44% (51 of 115)​
2019 -- 43% (89 of 205)​
 

Bob Jewett

AZB Osmium Member
Staff member
Gold Member
Silver Member
... Conditions -- The conditions for the streamed matches I tracked included:
• A Diamond 9-foot table with 4 1/4" corner pockets; ...​
I don't know if you track it, but the side pockets were 4 1/2 inches. It was possible for two balls to get hung up in the side which is pretty rare.
 

AtLarge

AzB Gold Member
Gold Member
Silver Member
I don't know if you track it, but the side pockets were 4 1/2 inches. It was possible for two balls to get hung up in the side which is pretty rare.
Thanks for the info. As you know, sides are usually ½" larger than corners. But the commentators, without giving a number, mentioned several times how tight the sides were in this event, so I wondered if they were less than 4¾".
 

L.S. Dennis

Active member
Thanks for the info. As you know, sides are usually ½" larger than corners. But the commentators, without giving a number, mentioned several times how tight the sides were in this event, so I wondered if they were less than 4¾".
Good question, I too heard them commenting on how tight the side pockets were.
 

Steve748

Registered
Watching some of the matches and seeing one player dominate b&r every rack looked a bit boring after a while.
Lots of other ball games alternate serve, pitch & bowl for a good reason.
I'm sure pool has had alternate breaks in the past and the 9ball tourneys I have played in have loser breaks in a race to 2 or 3.
I just think alternative break means more interest and excitement, well it does to to me.
 
Top