Chalk placement question

maha

from way back when
Silver Member
if it bothers you so much just get up and pick up the chalk after he walks away from it.
 

Good Sam

Registered
In APA you can use the chalk as an indicator, I do it all the time when teaching lower skilled players where to hit.

Outside of APA, I could care less if they need to use a piece of chalk. As someone mentioned earlier, if that's what they need then I'll be happy to play them.
We got into an argument one night with a "new" team. It turned out that they had played in the past when it was illegal to mark your point with a piece of chalk. After I showed them in the team manual where they changed the rule things calmed down. So the next time I used a piece of chalk to mark a spot, their player simply walked over and used that piece of chalk to chalk their cue while we were finishing our timeout. My teammate ended up making a good hit anyway. I said "karma" not quite under my breath and my team all had a good laugh.
 

maha

from way back when
Silver Member
unfortunately if it is legal to do then you are committing a foul by messing with the table while it is his shot
 

erhino41

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Who cares? Do whatever you want. If you need a piece of chalk to mark your spot then I'm confident I'm bringing much more to the table than you. I would never call it a foul, I wouldn't care in the least. The "you" in this scenario is figurative and not pointed at the op.

Sent from my LG-H918 using Tapatalk
 

NathanDetroit

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
The question about placing chalk on a diamond meant for sighting is that coaching a newer player it keeps the shooter from shooting at the rail in front of the diamond.
 

Bob Jewett

AZB Osmium Member
Staff member
Gold Member
Silver Member
I think it should be a foul if you leave the chalk upside down on the table. Hate that! :cautious:
Which would reduce Efren to a C player. I wonder if he has a reason for putting the chalk on the rail face-down. I suppose it is more efficient because you don't have to rotate it to your tip. Or maybe it's to let the loose chalk come out and keep the cube itself cleaner.
 

L.S. Dennis

Active member
Well we still don’t know if it is technically illegal to leave a piece of chalk on a diamond before shooting. At this point I’m inclined to think it isn’t. I looked through the BCA rule book and couldn’t find anything that says it’s illegal.

Ethically is a different story however,,,
 

gregcantrall

Center Ball
Silver Member
Playing scotch doubles as a B player with an A player partner, he would not coach but just go stand where he wanted to shoot from. After finding that very helpful, I developed the habit of just leaving my chalk on the rail where my next shot would be from. Well on the line of the shot. Gave me a good perspective for what side of the shot line I wanted to be on. I was never called on it until I beat the 730 FargoRate player too many times in the $5 tournaments. He walked to the table picking up the chalk and handed it to me. I have not done it since.
 

straightline

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
Well we still don’t know if it is technically illegal to leave a piece of chalk on a diamond before shooting. At this point I’m inclined to think it isn’t. I looked through the BCA rule book and couldn’t find anything that says it’s illegal.

Ethically is a different story however,,,
Marksmanship is unethical? :p
 

gregcantrall

Center Ball
Silver Member
Well we still don’t know if it is technically illegal to leave a piece of chalk on a diamond before shooting. At this point I’m inclined to think it isn’t. I looked through the BCA rule book and couldn’t find anything that says it’s illegal.

Ethically is a different story however,,,
From the BCAPL/CSI rules:
It is a foul if you intentionally mark the table in any way to assist you in executing any shot or future shot. Marking includes the deliberate placement of chalk or any other object at a specific point on a rail or cushion to aid the alignment of a shot, or placing any mark on any part of the table. The foul occurs at the moment you mark the table, regardless of whether you remove the mark or whether a shot is taken.
 

L.S. Dennis

Active member
This is the most specific answer to the original question, thank you for that. Logic would indicate what you refer to is correct. I’ll recheck my BCA rule book I must have missed it somehow.
 

gregcantrall

Center Ball
Silver Member
This is the most specific answer to the original question, thank you for that. Logic would indicate what you refer to is correct. I’ll recheck my BCA rule book I must have missed it somehow.
It is 1-39. Comes right after all the equipment stuff.
 

straightline

AzB Silver Member
Silver Member
From the BCAPL/CSI rules:
It is a foul if you intentionally mark the table in any way to assist you in executing any shot or future shot. Marking includes the deliberate placement of chalk or any other object at a specific point on a rail or cushion to aid the alignment of a shot, or placing any mark on any part of the table. The foul occurs at the moment you mark the table, regardless of whether you remove the mark or whether a shot is taken.
I'd rather see a player use the chalk as reference than do the "I shoot by magic." schtick and miss everything.
 

gregcantrall

Center Ball
Silver Member
I was creating a landmark which helped expedite the process. Eliminate the ability to place the landmark and it just takes a little longer to find an existing reference.(diamonds, balls on the table and even existing marks on the cloth) Back in the day of baby powder, it didn’t take long for white landmarks to appear all over the table.
 

Bob Jewett

AZB Osmium Member
Staff member
Gold Member
Silver Member
From the BCAPL/CSI rules:
It is a foul if you intentionally mark the table in any way to assist you in executing any shot or future shot. Marking includes the deliberate placement of chalk or any other object at a specific point on a rail or cushion to aid the alignment of a shot, or placing any mark on any part of the table. The foul occurs at the moment you mark the table, regardless of whether you remove the mark or whether a shot is taken.
Maybe there is more to the rule, but that says that if you place your finger along the line of a bank shot and you touch the cushion, you have fouled.
 

Pool Hand Luke

Active member
I set the chalk down face up a little to the right or left of where I stand for the shot line. When my turn is over I take it with me back to my seat. I buy my own chalk which means I never have to go searching for a decent piece that hasn't been drilled to the bottom. BTW I used to put the chalk face down for decades. The only reason I can think of is to keep from getting chalk all over my shirt if I leaned over a shot and didn't notice the chalk underneath me.

On some self help videos the presenter suggests putting the chalk on the rail to use as a target when shooting for position on your next ball. I don't remember how many different people suggest this on their videos, but I do remember at least one that mentioned it is illegal to mark aiming points with the chalk, so that's how I learned about it.
 

gregcantrall

Center Ball
Silver Member
Maybe there is more to the rule, but that says that if you place your finger along the line of a bank shot and you touch the cushion, you have fouled.
That is 1-39 in it’s entirety. By the rules defining the placed chalk as a mark rather than marker, you are right.
I chuckled thinking of wetting the finger first. The most common marking in my experience is when they aim the cue to the rail and allow the tip to touch the underside of the cushion. Leaving a very slight mark of chalk.
 

gregcantrall

Center Ball
Silver Member
I just read a little further in the rules published by csi.
Upon noticing that the scotch doubles says no conversation during a teams innings, I checked for the date. I know they modified that and allowed conversation the last time my wife and I played scotch in Vegas. The rules are dated 2014.
 
Top